Page images
PDF
EPUB

God alone know to set a right Value on the Things before him, but either perverts the best Things to the worst of Abuses, or else to their meanest Ule) With new Wonder now he views beneath him NATURE's whole Wealth, expos’d in narrow Room to all the Delight of human Sense; nay it was more ; it was a Heaven on Earth; for the Garden was the happy PaRADISE of God, by him planted in the East of EDEN; Eden was stretch'd out from AURAN (b) Eastward, to the Royal Towers of great SE LEUCIA, (i) built by the Kings of Greece; or where the Sons of Eden dwelt in TELASSAR. (k) In this pleasant Soil had God ordain'd his far more pleasant Garden, and to grow out of the fertile Ground all Trees of the noblest Kind, whether for Sight, Smell, or Taste; and exactly in the Middle stood the Tree of Life highly eminent, bearing ambrosial Fruit, and

Blossoms

(6) Auran, Haran, or Char. ran; Heb. i. e. Wrath. The chief City of Mefopotamia, whi. ther Abraham fled from the Wrath of God: because of the Idolatry of the Chaldeans, and also dwelt for a Time, Gen. 11. 31. Afts 7. 4. Jacob went to it afterwards for fear of Efau's Wrath, Gen. 29. which giveth Name to a large Country upon the River Tigris. It is called also Aram and Aramia ; from Aram the Son of Sem, i. e. Mighty; and is what we call Syria. This City is 440 Miles Northward from Jerusalem; now called Ophea. It is eleven Day's Journey from Nineve; populous, and hath a good Trade.

(i) Selucia ; Lat. Gr. i. e. A Glaring Light. Another famous City of Mefopotamia, called al.

fo Calne in the Land of Shinaz, Gen. 10. 10. Cocbe, then Alexandria ; because it was rebuilt by Alexander the Great; afterwards repaired by AntiochusKing of Syria, who called it Seleucia in Memory of his Father Seleucus, Gr. i. e. Glorious. It is forty Miles from Old Babylon upon the Confluence of the Exphrates and theTygris ; the Turks possess it now, and call it Bachda or Bagdad.

(k) Telefar, and Elafar, Heb. i. e. A Fort or Rampart of the Allyrians. A Country upon the Borders of Asyria, wherein the Edenites were garrisoned to guard Babylon, from the Incroachments of the Asyrians, Isa. 37. 12. Ezek. 27. 23. Between these Places the true Eden and Paradise were situated. Vid. Huet. de Situ Paradisi.

Blossoms of vegetable Gold; and next to the Tree of Life grew qur Death, the Tree of Knowledge; the Knowledge of Good, bought too dear through the Knowledge of Ill! Through EDEN Southward there went a large River, which never chang'd its Course, but underneath the shaggy Hill being ingulph'd pass'd through; for God had thrown that Mountain as his Garden Fence, high rais'd upon the rapid Current, which through Veins of the porous Earth drawn up with a kindly Thirst, rose a fresh Fountain, and water'd the Garden with many a Stream; thence united fell down the nop'd Shade, and met the lower Flood, which now appears from his darksome Pas{age, and now being divided into four main Streams runs different Ways, wandering through many a famous Realm and Country, whereof there needs no ACcount here ; but rather to tell how (if Art could tell how from that Saphire Fountain the curled Brooks rolling over bright Pearl and Sands of Gold, ran Nectar with many a winding Course under the spreading Shades, visiting each Plant and feeding the Flowers of DARADISEAC boucaulc and we PARADISE, which bountiful Nature and not nice Art had pour'd forth profusely, in Beds and curious. Knots in Hill, Dale, and Plain, both where the Morning Sun first smote warmly the open Field, and where the unpierc'd Shade held the Bowers in pleasing Darkness, even at Noon.

Thus this place was a happy rural Seat, with Variety of Prospect and Groves, some of whose rich Trees dropp'd Balm and sweet Gums; others, whose Fruit hung delightfully, streak'd as it were with burnish'd Gold, and of delicious Taste; what was fabled of the HESPERIAN Fruit true only here: Betwixt these Groves were Lawns, or level Downs, among which were dispers’d Flacks, grazing upon the tender Grass; or Hills of Palm, or else the flowry Edge of some well-water'd Valley spread its Store; Flowers of

'L 2

every

every Hue, and Roses without Thorns. Another Side shady Grottos, and Caves of cool Recess, over which the spreading Vine laid forth her purple Grapes, and gently crept with her increasing and wanton Branches; mean while the murmuring Waters fall difperfed down the slope Hills, or else unite their Streams in a Lake, that as it were holds a Mirror to the Bank grown over with sweet Myrtle. The Birds apply their Choir with vernal Airs, which breathing the Smell of the Fields and Groves, make Musick in the trembling Leaves, while Nature, attended by the Seasons and the Hours, led on a continual Spring : Not that fair Field of ENNA, (1) where PROSER: PINE (m) gathering Flowers was ravilh'd by Pluto, which caus'd Ceres all that Pain to seek her through the World; nor that sweet Grove of Daphne, by the River ORONTES, (n) and the inspir'd Spring of CasTALIA (0) might by any Means be compar'd to this

: PARA

(l) Enna; Chal. Pheen. i. e. to fix other Months below. Of A Garden and Fountain. Enna the Rape of Proserpina, See is the same as Eden, in the Lan- Pindar. Ode I. This Fable guage of the Phænicians, which hath nothing else in it, than that they borrowed from Mofes, Gen. the Corn, Fruits, &c. lie fix 2. 8. A most pleasant field in Months in the Ground, then the Heart of Sicily, abounding creep out of it, and Aourish fix with Springs, Fruits and Flowers. Months above it; and Ceres was There was a City, a Temple of an Inventress or Improverels of Ceres, and a fine Grove: And Husbandry, &c. 'The Poets out of it Pluto stole and carried make her the Queen of Hell.' off Proferpine into Hell.

(n) Orontes ; Gr. Lat. i. e. (m) Proferpine; Lat. i. e. Rapid. The largest River in Creeping out. The Daughter of Syria, rising on M. Lebanon, Jupiter and Ceres, ravished by washing many Cities in its Pluto. Her Mother Ceres went Course ; it runs by and thro' to Hell to get her released ; but Antioch into the Mediterranean because she had tasted a Pome. Sea. granate in Pluto's Orchard, Juo (0) Caftalia ; Arab, i. e. A piter could do no more, than furling Stream. A fine Spring give her Leave to accompany at the Root of Parnasus, sacred her fix Months above ; and Pluz co the Muses: Becaulc the plea

fant

PARADISE of EDEN; nor that Inand of Nysa, () furrounded by the River TRITON, (9) where CHAM, (r) the youngest Son of Noah, (whom the Gentiles call AMMON (s) and LYBIAN Jove) hid AMALTHEA (t) and her youthful Son BACCHUS, (u) from his Step-mother RHEA ; nor could the Mountain AMARA (x) be compar'd to PARADISE, where

the

L

3

[ocr errors]

fant Sound of it gliding down (s) Ammon, or Hammon ; Heb. that Hill, elevated the Imagina- i. e. Heat. Another Name of tion. Here is another of this Cham, whom the Old Egyptian's Name by the Grove of Daphne and Grecians worshipped under at Antioch, which foretold Ha. this Denomination. His Temdrian's Advancement to the Em- ple and famous Oracle stood in pire.

Cyrene, on the West Side of ECO) Nyfa ; Heb. i. e. A Bano gypt and the Desarts of Lybia.. ner or Refuge. A City of Ara... (8) Amalthea ; Chald. i. e. A bia, within the Isle of Nysa, up- Nurse ; Gr. i. e. very rich, or on the River Triton, where Bac- multiplying : Daughter of Me'chus was nursed, as they report. liflus, King of Crete, a Mistress

This Fable took its Original from and Nurse of Jupiter, which fed
that History related in Exod. 17. him with Goat's Milk and Ho-
15. where Mofes built an Altar ney ; and Mother of Bacchus.
to Jehovah Nili, Heb. i. e. The Jupiter gave her a Horn of
Lord is my Banner, upon the Vic. Plenty, which supplied every
tory over Amalek : For Bacchus Thing..
is Mofes among the Heathens. (c) Bacchus ; Heb. Barchus,
Hence Bacchus was called also i. e. The Son of Chus. The
Dionyfus, i. e. God of Nysa, or Natural Son of Jupiter by A-
the Nyfa of Bacchus. . malthea; (others say) by Semele,
.. (9) Triton ; Arab. i. e. A which may be the same Woman,
Pafure. A River in Africa, by a different Name. He first
which issues out of the Lake Tri- planted Vines and made Wine :
ton into the Mediterranean Sea, Therefore he was esteemed the
over-against the lesser Syrtis, and God of Wine.
divides Lybia into two equal : (x ) Amara, or Amhara, Heb.
Parts. Now Rio di Caps. and Ethiopic ; for the latter has

(r) Cham, or Ham ; Heb. i. e. a near Resemblance to the forHeat or Blackness; the 3d and mer Language ; for Example, youngest Son of Noah, Gen. 9. Abinu in the Heb. is our Father ; 24. And Jupiter among the Abana in the Ethiopic is the Gentiles. In the first Division fame ; so they call their Arch; of the Earth, Syria, Arabia, bishop. Amara is a Province Egypt, and all Africa fell to his under the Equinoctial, and one Share.

of the Kingdoms of Abyfinia, . . .

or

[merged small][ocr errors]

the Kings of ABASSINIA () guard their Children, (tho’ by some fuppos’d to be the very Place) under the Equinoctial Line, and by the Head of NILE, encompass'd with shining Rocks, a whole Day's Journey high ; but in Reality far remote from this AssyRIAN Garden, where SATAN without any Pleasure beheld all Delight, all Kind of living Creatures ftrange to him, and quite new to his Sight.

Two of Shape far more noble than the rest, upright and tall, erect like Gods, cloathed with native Honour and in naked Majesty, seem'd Lords of all, and seem'd worthy to be fo; for in their divine Looks shone the Image of their glorious Maker, Truth, Wisdom, and Sanctitude, pure and severe, (fevere, but plac'd in true filial Freedom) whence comes true Authority in MEN; though they did not seem equal, as their Sex was not alike: He was form’d for Valour and Contemplation, the for Softness and sweet attracting Grace; he only for God, but she for God and him: His fair large Forehead and elevated Eye declar'd absolute Rule, and his brown Hair, round from his parted Forehead hung curling, but not beneath

. his

true filial Forces pure and Maker, 1

or Upper Ethiopia, almost in tan) who settled afterwards in the Middle of it, on the South. Ethiopia Superior ; and there e. There is a Mountain of the same rećted a valt Empire of 26 or Name, about 90 M. in Compass, 30 diftinct Kingdoms. The a Day's Journey high, and en Portuguese discovered this Emcompassed with Rocks, with on- pire to the Europeans, A. D. ly one Entrance to it. On the 1500. And the Dutch call it Top are many beautiful Palaces, the Country of Prefter Jobn, wherein the Emperor's Children from Uncban Jahannan, one of are educated, and the younger the Emperors of it, about A. Sons kept 'till they die, that D. 1200. The upper Ethiopia they may not disturb the Govern- upon the Red Sea and the Perfment.

an Ocean, on the East Side of (u) Abafinia : from Abaseni; Africa. The Inhabitants are all Arab. A scattered People ; an black, and for the moft Part intient People of Arabia, near Christians, abæa, of the Pofterity of "yok

« PreviousContinue »