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TAXES OF EACH COUNTY IN CALIFORNIA,

8TATKIIENT OF TnE AMOUNT OF TAXES CHABOEABLE TO EACH COUNTY, AND!

MADE ON THE SAME, FOB TUE YEAR 1851-62.

Names of counties.

Butte

Colusi

Contra Costa.

Calaveras

El Dorado

Los Angelos

Klamath

Marin

Mariposa

Monterey

Napa

Nevada

Placer

San Francisco .

Sacramento

San Joaquin

Santa Clara

8an Luis Obispo.. Santa Barbara....

San Diego

Solano

Sonoma

Sutter

Shasta

Tuolumne

Trinity

Santa Cruz

Yolo

Yuba

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Total 833,138 97 63,770 81 385,909 60 246,359 97 15,934 01

DEBT AND FINANCES OF ST. LOUIS.

The total debt of the city amounts to $1,636,096 10. A considerable portion of this has been incurred for river and harbor and for various city improvements, and has been judiciously expended. The above sum includes $76,000 of stock issued to the Pacific Railroad. The following is from the Controller's Report:—

THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT SHOWS THE AMOUNT OF DEBT FALLING DUE IN EACH TEAR.

In 1862 $105,000

1853. 1854. 1855. 1856. 1857. 1858. 1859. 1860. 1862. 1863. 1864.

43,600
5,000
43,000
28,700
10,000
83,000
84,000
22,000
90,000
4,000
76,0110

$96,500

70,000

60,000

100,000

200,000

867,000

23,000

70,000

26,000

60,000

51,400 at various dates from 1858 to 1861.

In 1866.
1S66.
1867.
1868.
1870.
1871.
1872.
1876.
1890.
1895.

For the payment of harbor bonds, (117,000.) and the common sewer bonds, (42,000,) with the interest on the same, there is a fund provided by special tax.

The total amount of receipts into the Treasury for the past year were $714,195 80. Of this sum, $348,275 81 were received from merchant and harbor taxes, $273,448 27 THE LIABILITY OF THK STATE, OF EVERT DESCRIPTION, ON THE 1ST OF JANUARY, 1850.

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CAPITAL AND DIVIDENDS OF BOSTON BANKS, APRIL, 1852. Hie following table shows the capital of the several banks in Boston, and the semiannual dividends declared and payable in that city on the 5th of April, 1852:—

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FINANCIAL STATISTICS OF LOUISIANA.

Louis Bourdexon, Auditor of the State of Louisiana, in compliance with a resolution of the Senate, reports the amount of liabilities of the State in each of the years 1880, 1886, 1840, 1846, and 1850—also the amount of the annual receipts and expenditures from 1830 to 1852, as follows:—

STATEMENT SHOW1NQ THE AMOUNT OF THE ANNUAL RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, FOB THH YEARS 1830 TO 1852.

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1830 J

1881

1832

1833

1834 \

1835

1836

1837

1838

1889

1840

1841

1842

1843

1844

1846

1846

1847

1848

1849

1860

1851

STATEMENT SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF THE LIABILITIES OF THE STATE, OF EYERY DESCRIPTION, AT THE SEVERAL PERIODS NAMED, SAY FROM 1880 TO 1850.

Debts proper of the State in 1880 $153,200 88

Liabilities on bonds issued, as follows:—

To Bank of Louisiana $2,400,000

To Heirs of Thomas Jefferson 10,000

Consolidated Bank 2,500,000

Debts proper of the State in 1835 583,138 99

Liabdity on Bonds as follows:—

To Charity Hospital 125,000

To Union Bank 7,000,000

To Mechanics' and Traders' Bank 150,000

$7,275,000

Debts proper of the State in 1840 1,164,886 43

Liability on bonds as follows:—

To Citizens' Bank 10,000,000

To New Orleans Draining Company 60,000

New Orleans and Nashville Railroad Company 600,000

To Charity Hospital 100,000

Clinton and Port Hudson Railroad Company. 498,000

Mexican Gulf Railroad Company 100,000

Municipality No. 2 499,680

$11,747,680

Debts proper of the State in 1845 4,663,715 06

Liability on bonds as follows:—

To Municipality No. 1 600,000

To Municipality No. 8 80,240

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Bond9 to Union Bank $2,668,000

Bonds to Couiolidated Bank 1,376,000

Bonds to Citizens' Bank 6,468.000

For interest 577,888 7,015,887

Second Municipality 399,364

Third Municipality 30,240

Total 111,519,492

UNITED STATES TREASURER'S STATEMENT, MARCH 22, 1852.

TREASURER'S STATEMENT, SHOWING THE AMOUNT AT II1S CREDIT IN THE TREASURY, WITH ASSISTANT TREASURERS AND DESIGNATED DEPOSITARIES, AND IN THE MINT AND BRANCHES, BY RETURNS RECEIVED TO MONDAY, MARCH 22, 1852, THE AMOUNT FOB WHICH DIIAKT3 HAVE BEEN ISSUED BUT WERE THEN UNPAID, AND THE AMOUNT THEN REMAINING SUBJECT TO DRAFT. SHOWING, ALSO, THE AMOUNT OF FUTURE TRANSFERS TO AND FROM DEPOSITARIES, AS ORDERED BY THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY.'

Drafts heretofore drawn but not yet paid. Amount though payable. subj. tu draft

$1,806 72 $113,121 98

Amount on

deposit.

Treasury of United States, Washington... $114,928 70

Aasiataut Treasurer, Boston. Mass 434,429 20 13,263 55 421,165 65

Assistant Treasurer, New York. N. Y 2,147,323 51 237,813 68 1,909,509 88

Assistant Treasurer, Philadelphia, Pa 958,434 81 75,866 00 882,568 81

Assistant Treasurer, Charleston, S. C 92,973 66 17,595 58 75,377 98

Assistant Treasurer, New Orleans, La. ... 680,744 68 657,887 85 122,856 73

Assistant Treasurer. St. Louis, Ma 610,704 11 107,469 40 603,234 71

Depositary at Buffalo, New York 104.074 18 7,220 85 96,853 83

Depositary at Baltimore, Maryland. 48,681 68 6,447 53 43,234 15

Depositary at Richmond, Virginia. 17,327 14 200 33 17,126 81

Depositary at Norfolk, Virginia 40,152 97 2,866 68 37,286 81

Depositary at Wilmington, North Carolina. 6,087 95 8.419 39 8,668 56

Depositary at Savannah, Georgia. 79,454 47 12,902 38 66,652 09

Depositary at Mobile, Alabama...' 43,995 99 34,693 69 8,402 30

Depositary at Nashville, Tennessee 49,776 24 44,011 58 6,764 66

Depositary at Cincinnati, Ohio 20,986 87 1,288 41 19,753 46

Depositary at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.... 476 56 476 66

Depositary at Cincinnati, (late) 3,301 37 8,301 87

Depositary at San Francisco 564,387 96 399,755 78 164,632 18

Depositary at Little Kock, Arkansas 67,384 04 35,705 30 31.678 74

Depositary at Jeffersonville, Indiana 48.168 39 10,633 17 87,630 22

Depositary at Chicago, Illinois. 83.595 45 16,885 88 66,710 12

Depositary at Detroit, Michigan 27.124 96 19,526 18 7,598 78

Depositary at Tallahassee, Florida. 15,731 76 2,542 62 13,189 24

Suspense account $2,486 66 2,486 66

Mint of the U. 8, Philadelphia, Penn

Branch Mint of U. S., Charlotte, N. C

Braurh Mint of U. S., Dahlonega, Oa.

Branch Mint of U. S., New Orleans, La

5,649,900 00
32,000 00
26,860 00
960,000 00

Total 12,928,090 96 1,710,238 04 11,220,344 67

Deduct suspense account 2,486 66

100,000 00

6,649,900 00 32,000 00 26,850 00 860,000 00

$11,217,857 91

Add difference in transfers 1,655,640 00

Net amount subject to draft $12,773,397 91

Transfers ordered to Treasury of the United States, Washington. $460,000 00 Transfers ordered to Assistant Treasurer, New Orleans, Louisiana. 975,000 00

Transfers ordered to Assistant Treasurer, St. Louis, Missouri....

Transfers ordered to Depositary at Norfolk, Virginia 120,000 00

Transfers ordered from Assistant Treasurer, Pittsburg, Pa_ 646 00

$1,655,540 00 «A NATIONAL CURRENCY:" CONFIDENCE ITS BASIS.

Fbeeman Hint, Esq., Editor of the Merchants' Magazine, etc:—

Sia :—Allow a constant reader of your valuable journal to offer some reflections upon the above subject. Though much debated, yet the many opposing theories thereon show how little it is understood. Some insist upon "a metallic basis," some upon "credit as a basis," while a late writer, N. F. C, in your journal, vigorously pushes forward his own favorite theory of " A National Currency : Real Estate its Basis." The first of these is no doubt a substantial basis, the second, with perhaps some support, is a very essential one, while the last, contradictory as it mav seem, is not a real one. The views of Dr. Hall on this subject are well worthy of tne attention of your readers, being clearly laid down, his elucidations being much to the point The theory now offered is not proposed 89 a new one, but merely as the placing of the ideas of others in a tangible form, for in it nothing absolutely new is asserted, nor will it disagree with the ideas or opinions of any. N. F. C, in his paper, first pours a broadside into the banks, (well merited,) to whose parlors he traces the late panic in the money market, which appeared without notice and without apparent cause, for the country was everywhere prosperous, and the panic chiefly confined to the city and its immediate dependencies. N. F. C. then proposes that the money-making power should be taken from the banks and put with the State, that the basis of these issues should be the real values, or real estate of the country, that the State should give the owner of productive real estate money in "State notes" equal to a certain valuation on the real estate, taking a mortgage as security, without interest—the valuation to be made by "a board of value* and the sum loaned should never exceed the policy of insurance, the amount of which policy should be the touchstone of value.

Now we have to inquire, Will these State issues have any more substantial basis, though it may be real estate, than " bank notes"—is not real estate as fluctuating as other values) Can real estate sustain a value put upon it (against reverses) by this board of value and insurance policy! or is it the indorsement of the State "bearing the proud name of Pennsylvania, New York," or Missouri, that is to sustain it against depreciation 1 (pennsylvania credit once fell to 87.) Real estate is valuable like everything else, only in proportion to the uses to which it may be applied, and like everything else depreciates in times of panic. Who is there who does not know of real estate which has depreciated 75 per cent, and of insurance policies on which, after a loss by fire, payment even of 50 percent, on a just aud bona fide valuation of damage, has been stoutly disputed, and that too by the most Klsi'ectable companies! There is a speculation in real estate as well as stocks, and a much greater uncertainty in its value. See what vast changes have taken place in value of real estate even in this city of New York in the last few years; depreciation in some situations, increase ill others. Who has forgotten the condition of real estate in 1838 and 1840! houses vacant, and stores to let. Value of real estate and business prosperity rise and fall together. If this is so, and that it is so no one can deny, upon what must these State notes depend for their value but State credit? and what is that worth in hard times i Then the notes will certainly come back for redemption. Redemption in what r real estate— or gold f Whether they are backed by real estate or not, the o»ly way to give valae to these State notes is to induce the community, and the world at large, to believe they have equal value to gold, or to beget confidence in them, for without confidence, in a commercial point of view, there is no real value in anything, except such things Mare absolutely necessary to our existence. Water and air exist everywhere, and can be got without labor, therefore they may be said to be without value. Bread to eat and clothing such as is necessary to keep us warm cannot be had without labor, therefore they are of value, they have intrinsic values Bread may increase greatly in value, but does not depreciate greatly in value.

One country being at peace while the rest of the world was at war, would of coarse alter the relative value of thiugs very much.

But in a state of general peace, if there should be once established a general confidence in the commercial circles, there wonld be a great increase of value both in commercial things and real estate; but once destroy that confidence, and real estate will fall as rapidly as other things of value, and the absolute necessaries of life would fall less than real estate. In fact, the value of real estate depends on the general prosperity of the country. :ind the foundation of This can always be traced to confidence. Upon this also depends a merchant's credit, for let his wealth be what it may, if the commercial world have no confidence in his business ability, his industry, and integrity, he can get no credit, and so with corporations and communities of ail

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