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BONDS ISSUED IN CERTAIN DISTRICTS OF PENNSYLVANIA.

In reply to a resolution adopted in Senate, some time ago, calling upon the Auditor for a statement of the bonds, scrip, and other certificates of indebtedness I by the several counties, incorporated cities, districts, and boroughs of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, that officer has communicated the following:—

STATEMENT SHOWING TUE AMOUNT OF BONDS, SCRIP, AND OTHER CERTIFICATES OF INDEBTEDNESS ISSUED BY COUNTIES, INCORPORATED CITIES, DISTRICTS, AND BOROUGHS SUBJECT TO THE STATE TAX IMPOSED BY THE 42D SECTION OF THE ACT OF 29TH OF APRIL, 1844, TOGETHER WITH THE RATE OF INTEREST ON THE SAME, AND THE TIME WHEN REIMBURSABLE.

Counties, Cities, Districts, ice.

County of Alleghany a

Chester 6

Philadelphia e

c

City of Alleghany d

Erie e

Lancaster /.

Philadelphia g

9

Pittsburgh h

District of Kensington A

Moyamensing h

Northern Liberties t..
"»..

Pennsylvania,/

Southwark /■

k

Spring Garden /

f Hturisburg I

Westchester m.

"m

"m

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Total .

295,700 00
188,000 00

868,666 '66

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DEBT OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK.

The following statement of the debt of the city of New Tork is derived from the annual message of the Mayor:—

FUNDED DEBT REDEEMABLE FROM TAXATION.
SIX PER CENT BUILDING LOAN STOCK NO. 2.

Payable February 1, 1852 $50,000

"1853 50,000

""1854 60,000

"1855 50,000

■ "1866 60,000

6 per cent Washington Square Iron Railing Stock—Payable Nov. 1, 1862 6,000

5 " ""1853 6,000

Total $260,000

a Time of redemption not stated. b Redeemable in 1853, 1858, and 1854. e Time of redemption not stated. d Redeemable In 1847 to 1875. • Redeemable In 18B1; rate of interest not suited. / Part overdue; balance redeemable at various periods up to 1866. g Redeemable from 1854 to 1888. A No report or reply to circular. , Redeemable from 1835 to 1880.

j Redeemable from 1852 to 1876. k Redeemable from 1853 to 1885. / No report or reply to circular. i» Part overdue; balance redeemable in 1856 and 1858.

In addition to the above there have been issued since August 1st, the following:—

FIVE PER CENT PUBLIC BUILDING. STOCK NO. 8.

Payable November 1, 1857 150,000

"1858 60,000

* "1869 50,000

Total $150,000

NEW YORK CITV FIVE PEtt CENT STOCKS FOB DOCKS AND SLIFS.

Payable November 1, 1867 $50,000

"1868 60,000

""1869 60,000

""1870 50,000

""1871 , 60,000

"•' 1872 50,000

Total 8300,000

PERMANENT CITV DEBT REDEEMABLE FROM THE SINKING FUND.

6 per cent Public Building Stock, redeemable 1856 $515,000

5" Building Loan Stock, No. 3, 1870 50,000

5" Fire Indemnity Stock, 1868 6,525

5" Water Loon Stock, 1858 3,000,000

5" ""1860 2,500,000

5" ""1870 S,000,000

5" Water Stock of 1849, 1875 256,600

5" Water Loan Stock, 1880 2,147,000

5 and 6 per cent Croton Water Stock, 1890 850,000

7 per cent Water Loan Stock, 1862 889,207

7" ""1857 990,488

Total $14,578,908

FINANCES OF THE CROTON AQUEDUCT. In the Merchants Magazine for December, 1851, (vol. xxv., pages 704-716,) we published a carefully prepared account of the Croton Aqueduct, embracing the general statistics of its progress down to that time. From the report of the President, we extract the subjoined statement of receipts and expenditures for 1851:—

EXPENDITURES.

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Received for water

Received for interest on unpaid rates.

Received for permission to make connections with public sewers.

Total

Total receipts, appropriations, with balances from 1860, were..

Total expenditures in 1861

Balance in City Treasury

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IMPORT AND EXPORT OF GOLD AND SILVER.

We give below a statement of the export of gold and silver to foreign countries, from the port of New York, also of the receipts of gold and bullion at New York, from California, during the year 1861:—

EXPORTS OF GOLD AND SILVER TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES, FROM THE PORT NEW YORK, FOR

THE YEAR 1851.

August $2,653,444

September 8,490,142

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aay. June. July.

VALUE OF IMPORTS INTO THE PORT J>V NEW YORK OF GOLD AND BULLION FROM CALIFORNIA, FOR THE YEAR 1851.

TotaL $43,723,209

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OF THE FREE BANKING LAW OF ILLINOIS.

The answers to the questions annexed are from the Auditor of the State of Illinois, T. H. Campbell, Esq. For a more detailed catechism of this law the reader is referred to the Merchants' Magazine for January, 1862, (vol. xxv., pages 96-99.)

Question. Will it be required that an "individual banker" have any specif ed amount of capital?

Answer. The law makes no distinction between individual bankers and associations, and no specified amount of specie capital u required. O, Will it ne required thatte be a resident of your State!

A. I do not find anything in the law requiring that bankers shall reside in the State.

O, What amount of stocks must he deposit to commence receiving circulating notes?

A. Not less that fifty thousand dollars.

Q. Will such circulating notes require the signature of both president and cashier I A. Sec. 11 requires the signature of both president and cashier. Q. How much specie does the law require to be kept by the bank on the one hundred thousand dollars of circulation t or what per centage} A. The law does not require any specified amount.

Q. If circulating notes should be protested, must the holder deposit them with the auditor before you notify the banker; and how long can the holder retain such protested notes out of the hands of the auditor, and draw twelve-and-a-half per cent interest!

A. I am of the opinion that the law does not require the notes to be deposited with the auditor, and that the holder could not claim damages after he had notice of the ability of the bank to pay.

Q. What time, after giving notice that notes are protested and lodged in your hands, would the banker be allowed to pay the same) and, if paid within the time, would he be liable to have his banking business interfered with by any legal tribunal, for the single cause of having had his notes protested I

A. Sec 26 provides that the auditor shall, immediately after the bank had been notified to pay any note that may have been protested, proceed to adopt measures to pay the liabilities of the bank, and prohibit the officers from having any power to transact business.

Q. Is it necessary for an " individual banker" to file a certificate, such as is required by Sec 7 of the Act i A. It is.

Q. How must the circulating notes of an "individual banker" readt
A. The same as those of associations.

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COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

FOREIGN AND COASTING TRADE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, From the monthly accounts relating to " Trade and Navigation," "presented to both Houses of Parliament by command of Her Majesty," regularly forwarded to the Merchant*? Magazine by the Hon. Abbott Lawrence, our Minister to England, we compile the subjoined statements of vessels employed in the Foreign and Coastwise trade of the United Kingdom :—

AX ACCOUNT OF THE NUMBER AND TONNAGE OF VESSELS, DISTINGUISHING THE COUNTRIES TO WHICH THEY BELONGED, WHICH ENTERED INWARDS AND CLEARED OUTWARDS IK THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDED 5TH JANUARY, 1862, COMPARED WITH THE ENTRIES AND CLEARANCES IN TUE CORRESPONDING PERIODS OF THE TEARS 1850 AND 1851, STATED EXCLUSIVELY OF VESSELS IN BALLAST, AND OF THOSE EMPLOYED I.N THE COASTING TRADE AND THE TRADE BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND.

m ENTERED INWARDS.

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COASTING TRADE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM.

The following table, which we compile from the same official document, exhibits the

number and tonnage of vessels which entered inwards and cleared outwards with cargoes, at the several ports of the United Kingdom in the twelve months ended January 5th, 1852, compared with the entries and clearances in the corresponding periods of the years 1850 and 1851, distinguishing the vessels employed in the intercourse between Great Britain and Ireland from other coasters.

EMPLOYED IN THE INTERCOURSE BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND.
ENTERED INWARDS.

1850. 1851. 185!.

Ships No. 8,607 8,669 9,187

Tonnage 1,478,059 1,685,057 1,679,483

OTHER COASTING VESSELS ENTERED INWARDS.

Ships No. 124,668 127,588 124,450

Tonnage 10,489,414 10,979,574 10,715,419

Total ships No. 188,275 186,167 183,687

Total tonnage 11,967,473 12,564,631 12,394,902

EMPLOYED IN THE INTERCOURSE BETWEEN GREAT BRITAIN^AND IRELAND.
CLEARED OUTWARDS.

Ships No. 18,000 18,268 19,051

Tonnage 2,169,954 2,856,160 2,378,097

OTHER COASTING VESSELS CLEARED OUTWARDS.

Ships No. 131,166 184,072 181,899

Tonnage 10,755,630 11,285,360 11,088,018

Total ships No. 149,166 152,340 160,950

Total tonnage 12,915,584 13,640,526 13,466,115

TRADE OF THE UNITED KINGDOM WITH FOREIGN COUNTRIES,

AND BRrrlSH COLONIES AND POSSESSIONS ABROAD.

We are indebted to Henry 0. Carey, Esq., the Political Economist, for the subtabular statement of the value of imports and exports, for five years—that is, from 1845 to I860:—

Real or deOfficial value Official value clared value

of exports of exports of of exports of Official value of foreign ami British produce British produce Years. of imports. colonial goods. & manufactures. &. manufactures.

1846 £85,281.958 £16,280,870 £134,599,116 £60,111,081

1846 76,958,876 16,296,162 182.288,345 57,786,876

1847 90,921,866 20,036,160 126,130,986 68,842,377

1848 93,647,184 18,868,113 182,617,681 62,849,445

1849 105,874,607 26,561,890 164,689,504 63,696,026

1850 100,460,433 21,898,167 175,416,709 71,869,184

COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION OF THE PORT OF RIO DE JANEIRO IN 1851.

The subjoined statement of the Commerce and Navigation of the port of Rio de Janeiro in 1851, was prepared expressly for the Merchants' Magazine by Luiz H. F. rfAouiAR, the Brazilian Consul-General to the United States. In the Merchants' Magazine for April, 1851, (vol. xxiv., pages 474-475,) we published a similar statement for the year 1850, together with tables of the export of hides, rice, tapioca, rum, rosewood, sugar, tobacco, coffee, Ac, for a series of years, furnished at our hand by the game authoritative source.

In consequence of the complete repression of the slave trade, a great quantity of capital previously employed in that nefarious business found its way into the

TOL. XXVI.—NO. IV. 31

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