Democracy in the United States: What it Has Done, what it is Doing, and what it Will Do

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D. Appleton, 1868 - United States - 414 pages
 

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Contents

Jeffersons First Term as President
11
Jeffersons Acquisition of Louisiana
12
13 Pirates and the Freedom of the Sea
13
New England Clergymen preaching AntiDemocratic Principles
14
Secession proposed by the AntiDemocrats of New England
15
One of Natures Noblemen
34
Proposition to impeach Mr Jefferson
36
Why the Embargo was abandoned
38
FreeTrade and Sailors Rights
41
James Madison and his Political Principles
45
The Declaration of War
47
The AntiDemocrats endeavored to prevent Loans and Enlistments
50
The Navy and Naval Heroes
51
William Bainbridge e
53
25 Charles Stewart e e e 26 Stephen Decatur e 27 Isaac Hull e e e 28 Oliver Hazard Perry e e e e 29 John Rodgers e
55
PAGE
60
Thomas MacDonough James Lawrence David Porter The Army and its Officers
63
Zebulon Montgomery Pike
64
Alexander Macomb John E Wool
65
Jacob Brown
66
Andrew Jackson
67
Eleazar W Ripley Peter B Porter
69
William J Worth The Principles and Intentions of the AntiDemocratic Party during the War of 1812
70
Tompkins
75
Burning BlueLights
79
Disunion proposed by the Federalists e
80
The Hartford Convention of 1814
85
Mr Madisons Second Term
94
The Invasion Sacking and Burning of Washington PAGE 59 60 61 63 64 65 65 66 67 69 69 70 71 75 79 80 85 92 94
95
The Battle of New Orleans
97
The Bank Bills of 1815 and 1816
100
James Monroe and his Election to the Presidency
102
The Era of Good Feeling
104
The Monroe Doctrine
107
Banks and Banking in New York
108
The Acquisition of Florida
110
Remarks on Mr Monroes Administration
111
The New York State Constitutions of 1821 and 1846
112
The New York Electoral Law of 1824
116
Administration of John Quincy Adams
118
Equality the only Honest Basis of Legislation
121
Marcy
126
Political AntiMasonry
128
Internal Improvements by the Government
132
Veto of the United States Bank
137
The Removal of the Deposits
140
Senatorial Condemnation of General Jackson Michael Hoffman
145
Removals from Office
147
Terrible Distress of the Country
149
The Revival of a Gold Currency
156
Distribution of the Public Revenue
159
The Specie Circular
163
Thomas H Benton
166
Distribution of the Public Lands and Land Sales
169
Disunion in its Early Stages
171
Washingtons Farewell Address 17 3
173
Silas Wright
176
80 Jacksons Farewell Address
183
Martin Van Buren
188
Administration of John Tyler
228
James K Polk his Election and Political Principles
231
Mr Polks Administration
233
Zachary Taylor and his Administration
235
Millard Fillmore and his Administration
237
John Brown at Harpers Ferry
240
Azariah C Flagg
242
97
246
98 James Buchanan
249
Mr Buchanans Administration
251
100
257
Abraham Lincoln
259
102
261
Mr Lincolns Inaugural Address and its Consequences
264
104
266
The Suspension of the Writ of Habeas Corpus
270
Spies and SecretService Agents
273
107
276
108
279
110
283
111
288
112
291
Congressional FishingCommittees
294
Mr Lincolns Plan of Reconstruction
297
The Injury inflicted upon the Negroes by the Republican Mode of Manumission
299
116
301
The Reorganization of Louisiana and Arkansas and what came of it
304
118
307
The Freedmens Bureau
309
Mistakes of the American Clergy
313
121
318
Later Phases of Congressional Reconstruction
320
The American Press and the Telegraph
323
The Secession States were never in Law out of the Union
327
Andrew Johnson
333
126
337
Congress and the Supreme Court
344
128
348
Exchange of Prisoners during the War
349
What our Country was is and may be
353
Dean Richmond
357
132
360
President Johnson and Edwin M Stanton e
362
Slander as Political Capital
366
What has the Country gained by Republican Rule?
369
136
372
Issues to be tried by the People
376
Expenses of the National Government
384
140
387
143
388
Our Public Debt
389
145
391
A New Department of the Government
392
The Sedition Laws of 1798 revived 894
395
Conclusion
396
Appendix Constitution of the United States
400
Appendix No 2 The Test Vote
410
149
412

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Page 407 - The Congress shall have power to dispose of and make all needful rules and regulations respecting the territory or other property belonging to the United States ; and nothing in this Constitution shall be so, construed as to prejudice any claims of the United States, or of any particular state. SECTION 4. The United States shall guarantee to every state in this Union, a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion, and on application of the legislature, or of the...
Page 174 - ... it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national Union to your collective and individual happiness...
Page 406 - Crimes shall have been committed ; but when not committed within any State, the Trial shall be at such Place or Places as the Congress may by Law have directed. SECTION 3. Treason against the United States, shall consist only in levying War against them, or in adhering to their Enemies...
Page 175 - In contemplating the causes which may disturb our Union, it occurs as a matter of serious concern, that any ground should have been furnished for characterizing parties by geographical discriminations — northern and southern — Atlantic and western ; whence designing men may endeavor to excite a belief that there is a real difference of local interests and views.
Page 21 - Still one thing more, fellow-citizens — a wise and frugal government which shall restrain men from injuring one another, which shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned.
Page 173 - The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquillity at home, your peace abroad, of your safety, of your prosperity, of that very liberty which you so highly prize.
Page 108 - It is impossible that the Allied Powers should extend their political system to any portion of either Continent without endangering our peace and happiness ; nor can anyone believe that our Southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt it of their own accord. It is equally impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition in any form with indifference.
Page 401 - The Congress shall assemble at least once in every year, and such meeting shall be on the first Monday in December, unless they shall, by law, appoint a different day.
Page 264 - Apprehension seems to exist among the people of the Southern States that by the accession of a Republican Administration their property and their peace and personal security are to be endangered. There has never been any reasonable cause for such apprehension. Indeed, the most ample evidence to the contrary has all the while existed and been open to their inspection. It is found in nearly all the public speeches of him who now addresses you.
Page 260 - That the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively...

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