The Quarterly Review, Volume 172

Front Cover
William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, Sir John Murray (IV), William Smith, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle)
John Murray, 1891 - English literature
 

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Page 381 - Act or by treaty; or when such foreign state or nation is a party to an international agreement which provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States may, at its pleasure, become a party thereto...
Page 464 - When the Priest, standing before the table, hath so ordered the bread and wine, that he may with the more readiness and decency break the bread before the people, and take the cup into his hands, he shall say the prayer of Consecration, as followeth...
Page 526 - It is agreed that the people of the United States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind on the Grand Bank and on all the other banks of Newfoundland; also in the Gulf of St.
Page 95 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 59 - in the beginnings," but "in the beginning" God created the heavens and the earth. Indeed we declare, announce, and define that it is altogether necessary to salvation for every human creature to be subject to the Roman pontiff.
Page 399 - ON THE STUDY OF LITERATURE. The Annual Address to the Students of the London Society for the Extension of University Teaching. Delivered at the Mansion House, February 26, 1887. By JOHN MORLEY.
Page 304 - Experience, already reduced to a swarm of impressions, is ringed round for each one of us by that thick wall of personality through which no real voice has ever pierced on its way to us, or from us to that which we can only conjecture to be without. Every one of those impressions is the impression of the individual in his isolation, each mind keeping as a solitary prisoner its own dream of a world.
Page 192 - Miiller maintains that the story of the siege of Troy is a development of this simple Vedic myth, and is " but a repetition of the daily siege of the East by the Solar powers that every evening are robbed of their brightest treasures in the west.
Page 381 - ... provides for reciprocity in the granting of copyright, by the terms of which agreement the United States of America may at its pleasure become a party to such...
Page 468 - And here it is to be noted, that such Ornaments of the Church, and of the Ministers thereof, at all times of their ministration, shall be retained and be in use, as were in this Church of England, by the authority of Parliament in the second year of the reign of King Edward the Sixth.

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