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FIRST MESSAGE..
To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States :

The afflicting intelligence of the death of the illustrious Lafayette has been received by me this morning.

I have issued the general order enclosed, to cause appropriate honors to be paid by the army and navy to the memory of one so highly venerated and beloved by my countrymen, and whom Providence has been pleased to remove so unexpectedly from the agitating scenes of life.

ANDREW JACKSON. WASHINGTON, 21st June, 1834.

General Order. Information having been received of the death of General Lafayette, the President considers it due to his own feelings, as well as to the character and services of that lamented man, to announce this event to the army and navy.

Lafayette was a citizen of France, but he was the distinguished friend of the United States. In early life he embarked in that contest which secured freedom and independence to our country. His services and sacrifices constitute a part of our revolutionary history, and his memory will be second only to that of Washington in the hearts of the American people. In his own country, and in ours, he has been the zealous and uniform friend and advocate of rational liberty. Consistent in his principles and conduct, he never, during a long life, committed an act which exposed him to just accusation, or which will expose his memory to reproach. Living at a period of great excitement, and of moral and political revolutions, engaged in many of the important events which fixed the attention of the world, and called to guide the destinies of France at two of the most momentous-eras of her history, his political integrity and personal disinterestedness have never been called in question. Happy in such a life, he has been happy in his death. He has been called from the theatre of action with faculties unimpaired, with a reputation unquestioned, and an object of veneration wherever civilization and the rights of man have extended; and mourning, as we may and must, his departure, let us rejoice that this associate of Washington has gone, as we humbly hope, to rejoin his illustrious commander in the fulness of days and of honor.

He came in his youth to defend our country. He came in the maturity of his age to witness her growth in all the elements of prosperity; and, while witnessing these, he received those testimonials of national gratitude, which proved how strong was his hold upon the affections of the American people.

One melancholy duty remains to be performed. The last major general of the revolutionary army has died. Himself a young and humble participator in the struggles of that period, the President feels himself called on, as well by personal as public considerations, to direct that appropriate honors be paid to the memory of this distinguished patriot and soldier. He, therefore, orders that the same honors be rendered upon this occasion at the different military and naval stations as were observed upon the decease of Washington, the father of his country, and his cotemporary in arms.

In ordering this homage to be paid to the memory of one so eminent in the field, so wise in counsel, so endeared in private life, and so well and favorably known to both hemispheres, the President feels assured that he anticipates the sentiments, not of the army and navy only, but of the whole American people.

ANDREW JACKSON.
WASHINGTON, June 21, 1834.

SECOND MESSAGE.
To the House of Representatives of the United States :

I transmit to the House of Representatives, for their consideration, a memorial from the granddaughters of the Count de Rochambeau, together with their letter to the minister of the United States in France, from whom these papers have been recently received. . Translations of these documents accompany them.

'ANDREW JACKSON. WASHINGTON, June 20, 1834.

Ordered, That the said message and accompanying documents be referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs.

And then the House adjourned until Monday, 11 o'clock in the forenoon.

MONDAY, JUNE 23, 1834. Mr. Edward Everett, from the Committee on the Library, to which had been referred the bill from the Senate (No. 52) entitled “ An act to procure a bust, in marble, of the late Chief Justice Ellsworth, reported the same without amendment.

Mr. Burges, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, to which was referred the bill from the Senate (No. 61 ) entitled " An act for the relief of Elizabeth Robinson, daughter of Lieutenant Richard Wilde, deceased,” reported the same without amendment.

Ordered, That the said bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House to-morrow.

Mr. Elisha Whittlesey, from the Committee of Claims, made unfavorable reports in the cases of Henry Stoker, Thomas Evans, Don Juan Madrazo, William H. Morris, and Henry B. Brevoort, which were severally read, and laid on the table.

On motion of Mr. Evans, Ordered, That the Committee on Invalid Pensions be discharged from the further consideration of the cases of Ebenezer Smith. Jared Shinnick, Isaac Wiles, Salathiel Harris, and Charles Yancey, and that the said cases do lie on the table.

M r. Beardsley, from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported a bill (No. 542) declaring the effect of judgments in the circuit and district courts of the United States; which bill was read the first and second time.

M r. Gamble, from the Committee on the Territories, to which the subieet had been referred, reported a bill (No. 543) to attach the territory of the United States, west of the Mississippi river and north of the State of M issouri, to the Territory of Michigan; which bill was read the first and second time, and ordered to be engrossed, and read the third time. Mr. Mitchell, of Ohio, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, made a report on the petition of Joseph Swartwood, accompanied by a bill (No. 544) for his relief; which bill was read the first and second time, and committed to a Committee of the Whole House to-morrow. •

Mr. Evans, from the Committee on Invalid Pensions, to which had been referred the bill from the Senate (No. 104) entitled “ An act for the relief of Aaron Fitzgerald,” reported the same without amendment.

Ordered, That the said bill be committed to a Committee of the Whole House to-morrow.

Ordered, That the Committee of Claims be discharged from the further consideration of the petition of Guilford Dudley, and that it be referred to the Committee on Revolutionary Claims.

Mr. Chinn, from the Committee for the District of Columbia, submitted the following resolution :

Resolved, That the bills on the Speaker's table, reported by the Com. mittee for the District of Columbia, shall be the special order of this day from and after twelve o'clock.

The question being taken to agree thereto,

It was decided in the negative, two-thirds of the members present not concurring therein.

Mr. Gilmer, from the select committee to which was referred, on the 13th of June instant, the bill from the Senate entitled “An act to settle and establish the northern boundary of the State of Ohio,” moved that the committee be discharged from the further consideration thereof, and that the said bill be postponed until the next session of Congress ; when, on motion of Mr. Leavitt, the said bill was laid on the table.

Mr. Mitchell, of Ohio, submitted the following resolution ; which was read, and laid on the table for one day, viz.

Resolved, That the Secretary of War be directed to communicate to this House the several reports of the Board of Visiters to the Military Academy for the present year.

Mr. Briggs, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported that the committee did, this day, examine enrolled bills of the following titles, viz.

S. No. 70. An act for the relief of Charles Burkham and others, employed as spies on the frontier of Arkansas in eighteen hundred and thirty; and

S. No. 79. An act for the continuation and repair of the Cumberland road; and found the same to be truly enrolled; when The Speaker signed the said bills.

On motion of Mr. Gamble, Ordered, That the Committee of the Whole House to which is committed the bill (No. 362) to provide for taking a census or enumeration of the inhabitants of the eastern division of the Territory of Michigan, and of the Territory of Arkansas, be discharged, and that said bill be committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union.

A motion was made by Mr. Polk that the rule setting apart this day for the reception and disposition of petitions and memorials, be suspended from and after two o'clock P. M., and that the House do, at that hour, proceed to the consideration of the bill (No. 443) to regulate the deposite of the money of the United States in certain local banks.

A division of the question on the motion was moved by Mr. Elisha Whittlesey.

A motion was then made by Mr. John Quincy Adams to amend the said motion by striking out two o'clock and inserting five o'clock; which motion was disagreed to by the House.

And the question was then put on the first member of the motion made by Mr. Polk, viz. “That the rule setting apart this day for the reception and disposition of petitions and memorials, be suspended from and after two o'clock P. M.

And passed in the affirmative, (two-thirds of the members present voting therefor,) Yeas, 127; Nays, 61.

The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the members present,

Those who voted in the affirmative, are, Mr. John Adams to Mr. James Graham

Mr. Samuel McDowell Moore William Allen William J. Grayson

Henry A. Muhlenberg
William Baylies
John K. Griffin

John Murphy
Samuel Beardsley
Joseph Hall

Gayton P. Osgood
Andrew Beaumont
Nicoll Halsey

Sherman Page
John Blair

Edward A. Hannegan Gorham Parks
Abraham Bockee
Joseph M. Harper

James Parker
Ratliff Boon
Samuel S. Harrison

John M. Patton
James W. Bouldin
Samuel G. Hathaway

William Patterson
John W. Brown
Micajah T. Hawkins

Dutee J. Pearce
Samuel Bunch
Albert G. Hawes

Franklin Pierce
Robert Burns
William Hiester

Job Pierson
Jesse A. Bynum
Edward Howell

Henry L. Pinckney
Harry Cage
Henry Hubbard

James K. Polk
Churchill C. Cambreleng Abel Huntington

Ferdinand S. Schenck Richard B. Carmichael Leonard Jarvis

William Schley
John Carr
Noadiah Johnson

Dudley Selden
Zadok Casey
Cave Johnson

Augustine H. Shepperd
John Chaney
Seaborn Jones

William N. Shinn
Joseph W. Chinn
Benjamin Jones

Charles Slade
Samuel Clark
Edward Kavanagh

Francis 0. J. Smith
Clement C. Clay
George L. Kinnard

Jesse Speight
William K. Clowney
Amos Lane

James Standifer
John Coffee
Gerrit Y. Lansing

John T. Stoddert
Henry W. Connor
John Laporte

Joel B. Sutherland
John Cramer
Luke Lea

William Taylor
Thomas Davenport
Thomas Lee

William P. Taylor
Rowland Day

Humphrey H. Leavitt Francis Thomas
Philemon Dickerson
Chittenden Lyon

John Thomson
David W. Dickinson
Robert T. Lytle

Joel Turrill
Joseph Duncan
Abijah Mann, jr.

Aaron Vanderpoel
William C. Dunlap
Joel K. Mann

Isaac B. Van Houten
John M. Felder
John Y. Mason

David D. Wagener
Millard Fillmore
Moses Mason, jr.

Aaron Ward
Samuel Fowler
Jonathan McCarty

Daniel Wardwell
William K. Fuller
Rufus McIntire

Taylor Webster
John II. Fulton
James J. McKay

Reuben Whallon
John Galbraith
John McKinley

Campbell P. White
Roger L. Gamble
Jeremiah McLene

Frederick Whittlesey
James H. Gholson
Charles McVean

Elisha Whittlesey
Ransom H. Gillet
Jesse Miller

Richard H. Wilde
George R. Gilmer
Robert Mitchell

Henry A. Wise
William F. Gordon

Those who voted in the negative, are,
Mr. John Quincy Adams Mr. Daniel L. Barringer Mr. Tristam Burges
Heman Allen
Martin Beaty

George Chambers
William H. Ashley
Horace Binney

Thomas Chilton
Noyes Barber
George N. Briggs

William Clark
Charles A. Barnitz
John Bull

Augustine S. Clayton

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Mr. Richard Coulter
Mr. Hiland Hall

Mr. Robert Rainsay
David Crockett
Benjamin Hardin

John Reed
Edward Darlington
James Harper

William B. Shepard
Warren R. Davis
Abner Hazeltine

Jonathan Sloane
Edmund Deberry
James P. Heath

David Spangler
Harmar Denny

Jabez W. Huntington John N. Steele
John Dickson
William Jackson

Philemon Thomas
William W. Ellsworth William Cost Johnson Christopher Tompkins
George Evans
George W. Lay

James Turner
Edward Everett
Levi Lincoln

Samuel Tweedy
Horace Everett
James Love

Joseph Vance
John Ewing
Thomas A. Marshall

Samuel F. Vinton
Philo C. Fuller
William McComas

John G. Watrough
Rice Garland
Charles F. Mercer

Lewis Williams
Benjamin Gorham
John J. Milligan

Ebenezer Young
George Grennell, jr.

And on the question that the House do agree to the second member of the said motion, viz. “And that the House do at that hour ( 2 o'clock P.M.) proceed to the consideration of the bill (No. 443) to regulate the deposite of the public money in the local banks,”

. . There appeared.) I eas,

. . . . . . . . . . 123, ? Nays, . . . . . . . . . . . 65. The yeas and nays being desired by one-fifth of the members present,

Those who voted in the affirmative, are,
Mr. John Adams

Mr. Roger L. Gamble Mr. Jeremiah McLene
John J. Allen
Rice Garland

Jesse Miller
William Allen
James H. Gholson

Robert Mitchell
William S. Archer
Ransom H. Gillet

Samuel McDowell Moore
Benning M. Bean
George R. Gilmer

Henry A. Muhlenberg
Samuel Beardsley
William F. Gordon

John Murphy
Andrew Beaumont
James Graham

Gayton P. Osgood
John Blair
William J. Grayson

Sherman Page
Chatles Bodle
John K. Griffin

Gorbam Parks
Ratliff Boon
Joseph Hall

James Parker
James W. Bouldin
Nicoll Halsey

John M. Patton
Jobn W. Brown

Edward A. Hannegan William Patterson
John Bull
Joseph M. Harper

Dutee J. Pearce
Samuel Bunch
Samuel S. Farrison

Franklin Pierce
George Burd
Samuel G. Hathaway

Job Pierson
Robert Burns
Micajah T. Hawkins

Henry L. Pinckney
Jesse A. Bynum
Albert G. Hawes

James K. Polk
Harry Cage
Edward Howell

Abraham Rencher
Churchill C. Cambreleng Henry Hubbard

Ferdinand S. Schenck
John Carr
Abel Huntington

William Schley
Zadok Casey
Noadiah Johnson

William N. Shinn .
John Chaney
Cave Johnson

Francis O. J. Smith
Joseph W. Chinn
Seaborn Jones

Jesse Speight
Clement C. Clay
Benjamin Jones

James Standifer
Augustine S. Clayton
Edward Karanagh

John T. Stoddert
William K. Clowney
George L. Kinhard

Joel B. Sutherland
John Coffee
Amos Lane

William Taylor
Henry W. Connor
Gerrit Y. Lansing

William P. Taylor
John Cramer
John Laporte

Francis Thomas
Warren R. Davis
Luke Lea

John Thomson
Thomas Davenport
Thomas Lee

Christopher Tompkins Rowland Day

Humphrey H. Leavitt Joel Turrill
Philemon Dickerson
Dixon H. Lewis

Aaron Vanderpoel
David W. Dickinson
Chittenden Lyon

Isaac B. Van Houten
Joseph Duncan
Robert T. Lytle

David D. Wagener
William C. Dunlap
Abijah Mann, jr.

Aaron Ward
John M. Felder
Joel K. Mann

Daniel Wardwell
John B. Forester
Jobn Y. Mason

James M. Wayne
Samuel Fowler
James J. McKay

Taylor Webster
William K. Fuller
Isaac McKim

Richard H. Wilde
John H. Fulton
John McKinley

Henry A. Wise

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