Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic]

of Cant Chancellor

Blood

& Normandy Spurs

with

Staff

ye with y+

Two Crooms of ý Cap of

lapt of' Capt of Ensign & Lient

Horse Yennen
Gent & Lady Bed Chamber & 208 y Pensi.

Yeomen of
the Guard

MANUAL

of the Bed Chamber

the C: Women

oner's

Gaard ofy Goard of the Yeomen

of the Guard

P, Deeves delin et scalp

OF THE

PROCESSIONS AND CEREMONIES

OBSERVED IN THE

CORONATION

OF THE

KINGS AND QUEENS OF ENGLAND:

EXEMPLIFIED IN THAT OF

THEIR LATE

MOST SACRED MAJESTIES

KING GEORGE THE THIRD,

AND

QUEEN CHARLOTTE:

WITH ALL THE OTHER

INTERESTING PROCEEDINGS

CONNECTED WITH

THAT MAGNIFICENT FESTIVAL.

Embellished with Elegant Engravings.

EDITED BY RICHARD THOMSON.

First Gent. God save you, Sir! where have you been broiling?
Third Gent. Among the crowd i'the Abbey; where a finger

Could not be wedg'd in more.
Second Gent.

You saw
The ceremony

?
Third Gent.

That I did.
First Gent.

How was it?
Third Gent. Well worth the seeiug.
Second Gent.

Good Sir, speak it to us.
Third Gent. As well as I am able.

Shakspeare's Henry VIII, Act iv. Sc. 1.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR JOHN MAJOR,
18, SKINNER STREET.

1820.

TAT

J. Johnson, Printer, Brook Street,

Holborn.

Exchange
Lc Kaquista

PREFACE.

Events which are rare in their occurrence, impressive in themselves, and magnificent in their auxiliaries, will always excite a great degree of interest, of expectation, and even of anxiety, to witness them. Such were the Jubilees of the ancient Hebrews, the Festivals of the Sun in Peru, the grand Druidical Assemblies of the early Britons, the Inauguration of a Cardinal to the Pontificate; and to bring the resemblance home to our own knowledge, such is the splendid Ceremonial of a Royal Coronation. Then the mind turns as it were dissatisfied with the every-day actions of life, to the records of former proceedings, or to anticipations of the future; while the eye is no longer delighted with its common objects of interest, but would gladly exchange them for

the heraldic magnificence and pageantry of a Regal Court. It is, therefore, with a view to gratify this natural desire, that the following account of the last Coronation, in 1761, has been compiled from the best authorities of the time, in order that correct ideas may

be formed of the nature of such a national Ceremony: and this will serve a double purpose, namely, to describe and explain the scene to those who may have an opportunity of viewing it, and to convey a tolerable conception of it to those who will not.

It should be observed, that Coronation Ceremonials have differed but little for several Centuries; for, with the exception of some parts having become obsolete, and others being changed to agree with the present reformed Church Service, they remain nearly the same as they were when heraldic splendours were first introduced into England. But the Coronation Ritual which is now most commonly followed, is that which was observed at the Crowning of King James the Second and

« PreviousContinue »