Page images
PDF
EPUB

Queen Mary; which was performed on so extensive a plan, that, says a writer upon this subject in the year 1761, "it was, questionless, designed for the model of all future Coronations, and accordingly, by the King's express command, was recorded in the most pompous manner, which has been followed, with little variation, in the several Coronations since.” It is therefore evident, that originality cannot be pretended to in a work of this nature, but correctness is indispensable, and the Editor's researches to this end have been somewhat laborious. This, he hopes, will appear from the list of authorities, which is honestly placed at the end, in order to display at one view the various sources from whence his materials have been drawn: at the same time, the care which has been taken to explain the technical terms which frequently and unavoidably occur, he believes, may be claimed as a merit almost exclusively his own.

The principal aim of this publication having been detailed above: it is hoped that the succeeding pages will confirm what has been there declared for its object, and that it will be thought worthy of preservation for future reference, not only as a work of curiosity, but also as an ample assistant to the Ceremony of a modern Coronation.

DIRECTIONS FOR PLACING THE ENGRAVINGS.

Form of Procession, to face the Title
Ground-plan of Westminster
The Champion performing the Challenge.
Ancient Coronation-Chair and Regalia ......

. to face Page 26

65

82

ERRATUM.

Page 59, line 5, for Frederick Duke of York and Albany, read Edward.

Augustus Duke of York and Albany.

AN ACCOUNT

OF

THE CEREMONIAL

OF THEIR

LATE MAJESTIES CORONATION,

AND THE OTHER

HERALDIC PROCEEDINGS

CONNECTED THEREWITH.

KIN

ING GEORGE THE SECOND OF ENGLAND, died on Saturday, the 25th of October, in the year 1760, and was succeeded by his grandson, the late venerable and lamented George the Third. The Gazette, which bore the date of the subsequent day, announced this national event to the public in the following terms:

Whitehall, Oct. 26, 1760. YESTERDAY in the morning, between the hours of seven and eight, Our late most gracious Sovereign, King George the Second, was suddenly seized, at his Palace at Kensington, by a violent disorder, and fell down speechless, and soon expired, notwithstanding all possible methods used for his recovery. His Majesty departed this life in the seventy-seventh year of his age, and the thirty-fourth of his reign; beloved, honoured, and regretted by his subjects for his eminent and royal virtues.

As is usual in similar instances, the Council immediately met, to deliberate upon the best measures for proclaiming the new King, and for issuing those orders which were requisite upon the occasion. The conduct of the Sovereign at this Council was such as must have endeared him to

B

« PreviousContinue »