The Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Romans and to the Thessalonians

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1995 - Religion - 433 pages

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Contents

CHAPTER FIFTEEN
303
CHAPTER SIXTEEN
320
COMMENTARY ON THE FIRST EPISTLE TO THE THESSALONIANS
329
CHAPTER ONE
333
CHAPTER TWO
341
CHAPTER THREE
352
CHAPTER FOUR
358
CHAPTER FIVE
367

CHAPTER SEVEN
137
CHAPTER EIGHT
156
CHAPTER NINE
190
CHAPTER TEN
220
CHAPTER ELEVEN
238
CHAPTER TWELVE
262
CHAPTER THIRTEEN
280
CHAPTER FOURTEEN
289
COMMENTARY ON THE SECOND EPISTLE TO THE THESSALONIANS
383
CHAPTER ONE
387
CHAPTER TWO
396
CHAPTER THREE
413
INDEX OF SCRIPTURE REFERENCES
425
INDEX OF NAMES
430
GENERAL INDEX
431
Copyright

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Page 262 - God, to present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable to God, which is your reasonable service. And be not fashioned according to this world : but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is the good and acceptable and perfect will of God.
Page 67 - Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law ; that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.
Page 74 - God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets; even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all, and upon all them that believe; for there is no difference : for all have sinned and come short of the glory of God; being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus...
Page 167 - For as many as are led by the Spirit of God, these are sons of God. For ye received not the spirit of bondage again unto fear; but ye received the spirit of adoption whereby we cry, Abba, Father.
Page 46 - For as many as have sinned without law shall also perish without law: and as many as have sinned in the law shall be judged by the law...
Page 177 - Spirit also helpeth our infirmity: for we know not how to pray as we ought ; but the Spirit himself maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered ; 27 and ' he that searcheth the hearts knoweth what is the mind of the Spirit, because he maketh intercession for the saints according to the will of God.
Page 85 - Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works, saying ; Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.
Page 402 - Remember ye not, that, when I was yet with you, I told you these things?
Page 63 - That be far from thee to do after this manner, to slay the righteous with the wicked, and that the righteous should be as the wicked, that be far from thee : Shall not the Judge of all the earth do right...

About the author (1995)

Born Jean Cauvin in Noyon, Picardy, France, John Calvin was only a boy when Martin Luther first raised his challenge concerning indulgences. Calvin was enrolled at the age of 14 at the University of Paris, where he received preliminary training in theology and became an elegant Latinist. However, following the dictates of his father, he left Paris at the age of 19 and went to study law, first at Orleans, then at Bourges, in both of which centers the ideas of Luther were already creating a stir. On his father's death, Calvin returned to Paris, began to study Greek, the language of the New Testament, and decided to devote his life to scholarship. In 1532 he published a commentary on Seneca's De Clementia, but the following year, after experiencing what was considered a sudden conversion, he was forced to flee Paris for his religious views. The next year was given to the study of Hebrew in Basel and to writing the first version of his famous Institutes of the Christian Religion, which he gave to the printer in 1535. The rest of his life-except for a forced exile of three years-he spent in Geneva, where he became chief pastor, without ever being ordained. When he died, the city was solidly on his side, having almost become what one critic called a "theocracy." By then the fourth and much-revised edition of his Institutes had been published in Latin and French, commentaries had appeared on almost the whole Bible, treatises had been written on the Lord's Supper, on the Anabaptists, and on secret Protestants under persecution in France. Thousands of refugees had come to Geneva, and the city-energized by religious fervor-had found room and work for them. Though Calvin was sometimes bitter in his denunciation of those who disagreed with him, intolerant of other points of view, and absolutely sure he was right on the matter of predestination, he was nonetheless one of the great expounders of the faith. From his work the Reformed tradition had its genesis, and from his genius continues to refresh itself.

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