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AMERICA

H E R R Eso U R CEs,
A VI E W

The AGRICULTURAL, commercial,
MANUFACTURING, FINANCIAL, PoliticAL, LITERARY,
MoRAL AND RELIGious capacity

AND CHARACTER

of THE

AMERICAN PEOPLE.

BY JOHN BRISTED,

Counsellor AT LAw,

Auta o R of THE REs ou RCRs or The Bru ITISH EMPIR los
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LONDON :
PRINTED FOR HENRY COLBURN,
rustic LIBRARY, conduit street, HANoved square.

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B. CLARKE, Printer, Well-street, London:

DEDICATION.

, TO THE
HON. JAMES KENT,

CHANCELLOR OF THE STATE OF NEW-YORK,

SIR, WILL you permit me to place under your protection the following pages, in which it is

attempted to present a brief outline of the Re

sources and Character of a Country, whose public weal you have so powerfully upheld by your judicial talents and learning; whose private interests have been promoted, and whose private relations have been uniformly gladdened, by your social and domestic virtues?

I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your much obliged -
And most obedient Servant,
JOHN BRISTED,

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ADVERTISEMENT.

TowARDs the close of theyear 1809, when the result of the battle of Wagram had convinced the American public that the continent of Europe was finally subdued, and that England alone remained “an easy prey to the all-conquering arms of the Great Napoleon, I ventured to oppose the headlong current of popular opinion; and in the “Hints on the National Bankruptcy of Britain, and on her resources to maintain the present contest with France,” (afterward republished under the title of “Resources of the British Empire,”) undertook to demonstrate that the final destruction of the overgrown power of France was to be expected; First, from the nature of the French political and military institutions; Secondly, from the resistance of the people of continental Europe; and, Thirdly, from the resources of the British Empire. *: . . . . .

This work was no sooner published than many profound politicians pronounced the author to be “a visionary fanatic, a mere closet recluse, unacquainted with men and things, deficient in judgment, and wanting common sense;” and persisted, with increased vehemence, as they inhaled fresh inspirations from the “savi spiracula Ditis,"to prophesy that France “would soon stretch her sceptre over the whole of Europe, plant her tri-coloured flag on the Tower of London,

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