Works of Washington Irving: Washington

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J. B. Lippincott & Company, 1870

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Page 317 - The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, 1 Afterwards Professor John Robinson of Edinburgh. , LANDING OF THE TROOPS. 321 Await alike the inevitable hour. The paths of glory lead but to the grave." " Now, gentlemen," said he, when he had finished, " I would rather be the author of that poem than take Quebec.
Page 223 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 481 - You may believe me, my dear Patsy, when I assure you, in the most solemn manner, that, so far from seeking this appointment, I have used every endeavor in my power to avoid it, not only from my unwillingness to part with you and the family, but from a consciousness of its being a trust too great for my capacity...
Page 362 - Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Page 481 - I shall feel no pain from the toil or the danger of the campaign ; my unhappiness will flow from the uneasiness I know you will feel from being left alone. I therefore beg, that you will summon your whole fortitude, and pass your time as agreeably as possible. Nothing will give me so much sincere satisfaction as to hear this, and to hear it from your own pen.
Page 361 - They had not only a respect, but an affection for Great Britain ; for its laws; its customs, and manners, and even a fondness for its fashions, that greatly increased the commerce.
Page 84 - G they would do it ; for that, although they were sensible the English could raise two men for their one, yet they knew their motions were too slow and dilatory to prevent any undertaking of theirs. They pretend to have an undoubted right to the river from a discovery made by one La Salle...
Page 414 - I hope, that there is public virtue enough left among us to deny ourselves everything but the bare necessaries of life to accomplish this end.
Page 356 - Britian, can well be dispensed with. This consequently, will introduce frugality, and be a necessary incitement to industry As to the stamp act, regarded in a single view, one of the first bad consequences attending it, is, that our courts of judicature must inevitably be shut up ; for it is impossible, or next to impossible, under our present circumstances, that the act of Parliament can be complied with, were we ever so willing to enforce its execution. And not to say (which alone would be sufficient)...
Page 373 - British subjects, as thereby the inestimable privilege of being tried by a jury from the vicinage, as well as the liberty of summoning and producing witnesses on such trial, will be taken away from the party accused.

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