The dispatches and letters of vice admiral ... Nelson, with notes by sir N.H. Nicolas, Volume 6

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Contents

To William Marsden Esq At Sea 26th December
299
To ViceAdmiral Sir John Orde Bart At Sea 29th December
305
To his Highness the Grand Vizir Off Toulon 2nd January
311
To his Excellency Hugh Elliot Esq Victory 13th January
317
To his Excellency Hugh Elliot Esq Victory 13th January
320
To Commissioner Otway Victory 18th January
324
To his Excellency Sir John Acton Bart Victory 25th January
330
To Samuel Briggs Esq Victory 4th February
336
To the Right Honourable Lord Viscount Melville 14th February
342
To Sir Alexander Ball Bart Victory Gulf of Palma 8th March
348
To the Right Honourable Viscount Melville At Sea 10th March
354
To William Marsden Esq At Sea 14th March
360
To Admiral Lord Radstock Victory 15th March
366
To William Marsden Esq At Sea 19th March
372
To William Marsden Esq Sardinia 27th March
378
To William Marsden Esq Victory 30th March
384
To Alexander Davison Esq Victory 30th March
390
To William Marsden Esq At Sea 5th April
396
To Alexander Davison Esq Victory 6th April
400
To his Excellency Hugh Elliot Esq Victory 18th April
407
To Admiral Lord Gardner Victory 19th April
413
To Captain Keats Victory 1st May
419
To James Cutforth Esg Gibraltar Bay 6th May
425
To William Haslewood Esq Victory 16th May
441
To William Marsden Esq Off Trinidad 8th June
448
To Sir Alexander Ball Bart About 12th June
454
To his Excellency Sir John Acton Bart Victory 18th Jone
460
Diary 21st June
464
To William Marsden Esq At Sea 10th July
470
To ViceAdmiral Collingwood Victory 20th July
477
To William Marsden Esq Gibraltar Bay 21st July
483
To William Marsden Esq Victory 26th July
499
VOL VI

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Page 202 - Venerable, off the coast of Holland, the i2th of October, by log (nth1 three PM Camperdown ESE eight mile. Wind N. by E. Sir, I have the pleasure to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that...
Page 502 - Thiers, it appeal's, has also derived much valuable information. Many interesting memoirs, diaries, and letters, all hitherto unpublished, and most of them destined for political reasons to remain so, have been placed at his disposal ; while all the leading characters of the empire...
Page 368 - I have to request you will be pleased to lay before the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty the...
Page 280 - Sir, — I have the pleasure to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that at nine o'clock this morning I got sight of the Dutch fleet.
Page xi - The business of an English Commander-in-Chief being first to bring an Enemy's Fleet to Battle, on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his Ships close on board the Enemy, as expeditiously as possible ;) and secondly, to continue them there, without separating, until the business is decided...
Page 413 - Feeling that even a doubt upon such a subject cannot be entertained consistently with my reputation as Commander in Chief, I request that you will be pleased to move the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to direct a Court Martial to be assembled as early as possible, for the purpose of enquiring into my conduct as Commander in Chief.53 With such ease was Cochrane outmanoeuvred in the quarrels of public life.
Page 453 - So far from being infallible, like the Pope, I believe my opinions to be very fallible, and therefore I may be mistaken that the enemy's fleet has gone to Europe ; but I cannot bring myself to think otherwise, notwithstanding the variety of opinions which different people of good judgment form.
Page 427 - My lot is cast, my dear Ball, and I am going to the West Indies, where, although I am late, yet chance may have given them a bad passage, and me a good one : I must hope the best.
Page 479 - Eussell to transmit to you, for the information of the 'lords commissioners of the admiralty, a copy of a letter...
Page 439 - The business of an English commander-in-chief being first to bring an enemy's fleet to battle on the Nelson's Plan of Attack. most advantageous terms to himself — I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy as expeditiously as possible — and, secondly, to continue them there without separating until the business is decided...

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