Guide Book to the Local Marine Board Examination: The Ordinary Examination

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Simpkin, Marshall, 1875 - Merchant marine - 396 pages

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Page 48 - The Logarithm of a number to a given base is the index of the power to which the base must be raised to give the number. Thus if m = a", x is called the logarithm of m to the base a.
Page 30 - PROOF. — Multiply the divisor by the quotient, and to the product add the remainder, if any.
Page 2 - Testimonials of character, and of sobriety, experience, ability, and good conduct on board ship will be required of all applicants, and without producing them no person will be examined. As such testimonials may have to be forwarded to the office of the Registrar-General of Seamen in London for verification before any certificates can be granted, it is desirable that candidates should lodge them as early as possible. The testimonials of...
Page 116 - Unlike sea water, brackish waters differ in quality, quantity, and composition not only from place to place, but also from time to time even at a given location.
Page 5 - Mates are made compulsory, the qualifications have been kept as low as possible; but it must be distinctly understood that it is the intention of the Board of Trade to raise the standard from time to time, whenever, as will no doubt be the case, the general attainments of officers in the Merchant Service shall render it possible to do so without inconvenience...
Page 3 - He will be questioned as to his knowledge of invoices, charter-party, Lloyd's agent, and as to the nature of bottomry, and. he must be acquainted with the leading lights of the channel he has been accustomed to navigate, or which he is going to use. In cases where an applicant for a certificate as master ordinary has only served in a fore and aft rigged vessel...
Page 3 - In addition to what is required by a Second Mate, he must know how to moor and unmoor, and to keep a clear anchor ; to carry out an anchor ; to stow a hold ; and to make the requisite entries in the ship's log.
Page 351 - How would you find the time of high- water at any place, the Admiralty tide tables not being at hand, nor any other special tables available '{ A.
Page 328 - With the deviation as above, give the courses you would steer by the Standard Compass to make the following courses, correct magnetic : — . . 9.
Page 106 - The variation is said to be easterly when the North end of the needle is drawn to the eastward, and westerly when drawn to the westward of the true North ; thus, when the North end of the needle points to that part of the horizon which is true NNW W., the variation is said to be 2^ points West ; but when it points to the N.

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