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THE Rofcial

Page 1 Hare Tortoise, 1757 Page 156

157

Night, an Epistle to Robert Lloyd

ib.

13 The Nightingale, Owl and Cuckow

The Prophecy of Famine

15| A Tale

158

An Epiftle to William Hogarth

20 | Shakespeare (an epifle to Garrick)

160

The Ghost (in four books) book I.

25 Epistle to Churchill

161

IT.

29 Epifle to J. B. efq. 1757

163

Ilf.

35 Another, to the same, 1757

164

IV.

44

To *** * about to publith a volutne of Mif-

The Conference

59

cellanies in 1755

165

The Author

62 To George Colman, efq.

166

The Duellift (in three books) book I. 65 Two Odes, ode I.

168

II. 67

II. to oblivion

169

III. 69 The progress of envy

170

Gotham (in three books) book I.

13 Prologue to the Jealous Wife

173

II.

77
on the King's Birth-day

ib.

III.

82

to Hecuba

174

The Candidate
87 Ode, spoken at Westminster-fchool

ib,

The Farewell

94 Tears and Triumph of Parnassus

175

The Times

98 Arcadia, a Dramatic Pastoral

177

Independence

103 Epistle to Mr. Colman, 1756

170

The Journey

108 The Puff

180

Dedication to Churchill's Sermons

109

Chit-chat

18%

Dialogues between the Author and his friend 185

FALCONER'S POEMS.

The Poet

The two Rubric posts

19Σ

The Shipwreck, Canto 1.

Song

192

II

A familiar epistle, to J. B.
II.

ih.

esq.
120

The Milkmaid

III.

195

129
Occasional Elegy

A Familiar Epistle from the Rev. Mt. Han-

137
A Poem, facred to the memory of Frederick

bury's horfe to the reverend Mr. Scot ib.

prince of Wales

ibid.

The New River-head, a Tale

197

ode on the Duke of York's departure from

A familiar letter of rhymes

199

England as rear admiral

The Cobler of Tiflington's kettet

201

The Fond Lover, a ballad

139 The Cobler of Cripplegate's Letret" 203

141

The Demagogue

On Rhyme

204

ib.

A Familiar Epistle to a Friend, who senr the

Author a hamper of wine

207

LLOYD'S POEMS.
The Candle and Snuffers, a fable

209

The Author's Apology

The Temple of Favour

ib.

147 The Spirit of Contradiction, a tale

211

The Actor
148 |A familiar Epistle to

21%

The Law Student-

151 Charity, a fragment

213

The Poetry Professors

152 The Whim

215

The Cit's Country-box; 1757

154 Ode to Genius

216

Genius, Envy and Time, a fable
155 | Prologues, 1757

207

189

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Page

Prologues, 1758

217 The Complaint; or, Night Thoughts.

Prologus in Adelphos, 1759

ib. Night 1. of Life, Death, and Immortality 291

Epilogus in Adelphos, 1759

ib.

II. On Time, Death and Friendship 295

Recte ftatuit Baxterus de Somniorum Pho-

III. Narcista

301

nomenis

218

IV. The Chriftian Triumph

306

Carmina ad Ducem de Newcastle

V. The Relapse

313

Id Cancellarium

VI. The Infidel reclaimed, Part I. 322

gy written in a country church yard, by

VII.

Mr. Gray

219

VIII, Virtue's Apology

343

Carmen elegiacum in Coemeterio rustico

- IX. and laft, The Consolation

355

compofitum

ib. Resignation. In Two Parts, Part I.

The epitaph

221

II.

383

Epitaphium

ib. On the Death of Queen Anne, and Succeflion

Song, by a perfon of quality

of Georget.

390

Carmen Elegans

ib. The Intiment

392

Part of Homer's hymn to Apollo

ib. Epistle to Lord Lansdowne

394

From Catullus

224 Two Epistles to Mr. Pope

The first book of the Henriade

ib. Mr. Doddington's Epistle to Sir R. Walpole 403

An imitation from the Spectator

2.28 The Old Man's Relapse

405,

A ballad
229 Lord Melcombe to Dr. Young

ib.

To Chloe

ib. Sea-pieces.--Dedication to M. Voltaire 406

To the moon

230

Ode I.

ib.

Song

231

II.

407

To the reverend Mr. Hanbury

ib. Imperium Pelagi; á Naval Lyric

408

Sent to a lady with a seal

ib.

A ballad

ib.

THOMSON'S POEMS.

Epistle to a friend

232

Songs in the Capricious Lovers

The Seasons.--Spring

420

Summer

439

YOUNG'S POEMS.

Autumn

445

Winter

457

Verses to the Author

236 A Hymn

467

The Last Day, book I.

237 Britannia, A Poem

469

240 Liberty. A Poem, in Five Parts.Ancient

III.

243 and Modern Italy compared. Part I. 471

The Force of Religion, 'or Vanquished Love, Greece. Part II.

474

book I.

246 Rome. Part Hi.

479

II.

249 Britain. Part IV.

484

Love of Fame, the Universal Passion, in

"The Prospect. Part V.

494

Seven Satires, Satire I.

251 The Cattle of Indolence, an Allegorical Poem,

II.

254 in Two Cantos. Canto l.

III.

257

II.

507

IV.

259 A Poem facred to the Memory of Sir Isaac

· V. On Women

261 Newton. Infcribed to the Right Hon.

VI: Oh Women 266 Sir R. Walpole

515

VII.

272 A Poem to the Memory of the Right Hon,
Ode to the King

274 the Lord Talbot, late Chancellor of Great
Ocean, an Ode

270 Britain. Addressed to his Son

Paraphrase on part of the Book of Job 280 Poeng on several Occasions.- Versus occa-

On Michael Angelo's famous Piece of the fioned by the Death of Mr. Aikman, a

Crucifixion

particular Friend of the Author's

519

To Mr. Addison on the Tragedy of Cato ib. To the Rev. Mr. Murdoch, Restor of Strad-

Epilogue to the Tragedy of the Brothers ib. đifhall in Susfolk, 1738

320

Letter to Mr. Tickell, on the Death of Epitaph on Miss Stanley

ib
Mr. Addison

285 A Paraphrafe on the latter Part of the fixth
Reflections on the Public Situation of the

Chapter of St. Matthew

ib.
Kingdom in 1745

520

On Dr. Young's Translation of part of Job 291 Songs

522

Epitaph on Lord Aubery Beauclerk ib. A Hymn 00 Solitude

523

Istaph on Dr: Young's servant

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576

284

286 Odes

ib.

Home

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THE

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The town divided, each runs sev'ral ways, Ros

As passion, humour, int'rest, party sways.
с IA D.

Things of no moment, colour of the hair,
OSCIUS deceas'd, cach high aspiring play's

Shape of a leg, complexion brown or fair,

A dress well chofen, or a patch misplac’d,
Push'd l his int'rest for the vacant chai:. Conciliate favour, or create distaste.
The buskin'd heroes of the mimic stage

From galleries loud peals of laughter roll,
No longer whine in love, and rant in rage ;

And thunder Shuter's praises--he's so droll.
The monarch quits his throne, and condescends Embox'd, the ladies must have something smart,
Humbly to coubt the favour of his friends :

Palmer! Oh! Palmer tops the janty part.
For pity's fake tells undeserv'd mishaps,

Seated in pit, the dwarf, with aching eyes,
And, their applause to gain, recounts his claps. Looks up, and vows that Barry's out of size ;
Thus the victorious chiefs of ancient Rome, Whilft to fix feet the vig'rous stripling grown,
To win the mob, a suppliant's form assume,

Declares that Garrick is another Coan.
In pompous train fight o'er th' extinguish'd war, When place of judgment is by whim supply'do
And shew where honour bled in ev'ry scar.

And our opinions have their rise in pride ;
But though bare merit might in Rome appear When, in discoursing on each mimic elf,
The strongest plea for favour 'tis not here ;

We praise and censure with an eye to self;
We form our judgment in another way ;

All must meet friends, and Ackman bids as fair
And they will best succeed, who best can pay : In such a court, as Garrick, for the chair.
'Those, who would gain the votes of British tribes, At length agreed, all squabbles to decide,
Must add to force of merit, force of bribes. By some one judge, the cause was to be try'd;
What can an actor give ? in ev'ryage

But this their

squabbles did afresh renew,
Calh hath been rudely banish'd from the stage ; Who should be judge in such a trial : Who?
Monarchs themselves, to grief of ev'ry play'r, For Johnson some, but Johnson, it was fear’d,
Appear as often as their image there :

Would be too grave ; and Sterne too gay appear’d: 'They can't, like candidate for other feat,

Others for Francklin voted ; but 'twas known,
Pour seas of wine, and mountains raise of meat. He ficken'd at all triumphs but his own :
Wine ! they could bribe you with the world as soon, For Colman many, but the peevith tongue
And of roast beef, they only know the tune : Of prudent Age found out that he was young :
But what they have they give, could Clive do more, For Murphy some pilforing wits declar'd,
Though for each million he had brought home four ? Whilft Folly clapp'd her hands, and Wisdom star’d.
Shuter keeps open house at Southwark fair,

To mischief train'd, e'en from his mother's womb
And hopes the friends of humour will be there ; Grown old in fraud, thu' yet in manhood's bloom,
In Smithfield, Yates prepares the rival treat Adopting arts, by which gay villains rise,
For those who laughter love, instead of meat; And reach the heights which honest men despise ;
Foote, at Old House, for even Foote will be, Mute at the bar, and in the fedate loud,
In felf-conceit, an actor, bribes with tea;

Dull ’mongst the dullest, proudest of the proud ;
Which Wilkinfon at second-hand receives,

A pert, prim, prater of the northern race,
And at the New, pours water on the leaves. Guilt in his heart, and famine in his face,
VOL. VIII.

B

515

16

19

20

ib.

ib.

20

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