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LONDON, SATURDAY, MARCH 19, 1904.

Wildish rejoins, "This was enough to make

any man a wit," and the elder man continues, CONTENTS.-No. 12.

Pooh! this was nothing. I was a critic NOTES :-Shadwell's Bury Fair, 221–William of Woken at Blackfriars ; but at Cambridge, none 80

Henry Cole--Nicholas Harpsfield-John Harpsfield, 224 — great as I with Jack Cleveland. But Tom
The Last of the War Bow -- Names of our English Kings Randol(ph) and I were hand and glove: Tom
J. R. Green on Freeman-"Go for "-Last Peer of France
_"Fulture"- First Steam Railway Train, 225.

was a brave fellow; the most natural poet!” QUERIES

:-Townshend Pedigrees - Luke King, Deputy John Cleveland, the Cavalier poet, had Muster Master-Mrs. Lane and Peter Pindar - Catskin Barls – Boer War of 1881 – Game of State - Powell of entered Christ's College in 1627, and was Wife-Franco-German War, 226 - Speakers of the Irish dolph, poet and dramatist, went up from Birkenhead – Northall, Shropshire --- Rodney's Second Fellow of St. John's 1634-45; Thomas RanHouse of Commons -- Leper Hymn-Writer: A fotos Westminster to Trinity 1623, and in 1632 left would a-wooing go well-Dr. Samuel Hiuds - Charles Vion Languages.classed by his contemporaries among the Pbysic Garden – Kick the bucket" - Robina Crom. Cambridge for London. Randolph, who was Year-Field-names, Brightwalton, Berks Flowers the most pregnant wits of the age," died within alphabet of angels" - Dickens Queries – Periodicals for three months of his thirtieth birthday : Women-"Mustlar": REPLIES :-Tideswell and Tideslow, 228- The Wreck of the his haire, according to Aubrey, was of a very Wager --Football on Shrove Tuesday, 230-Rue and Tuscar light flaxen, almost white. It was flaggy, as by his tollage" -"Cockshut time” _* Recommended to Mercy picture before his booke appeares. He was of a -Epitaph on Sir John Seymour-"Son confort et liesse" pale, ill complexion and pock-pitten." Egremont, 233-—Sir Christopher Parkins-Army of Llacoln with his wife, Lady Fantast, Oldwit says :

**Silly Billy": 232- Salep February 30 of Earlo Again, in Act II. scene i., in an altercation “He who knows not," &c.-Curious Christian Names, 235 -French Miniature Painter Browning's Text - "Morale" Jonson's son, and afterwards an intimate crony of

“Shall I, who was Jack Fletcher's friend, Ben <-- Aunceli," 237—Mess Dress : Sergeants' Sashes –Japa Jack Cleaveland and Tom Randolph, have kept

nese Names, 238. NOTES ON BOOKS :-Waller's Hobbes's Leviatban'- company with wits, and been accounted a wit these Great Masters '-Lucas's Works of Charles and Mary fifty years, live to be deposed by you?” Lamb'—Coleridge's · Works of Byron ’-Booksellers' Cata- And again :logues. Notices to Correspondents.

“I, that was a Judge at Blackfriars, writ before

Fletcher's Works and Cartwright's, taught even Notes.

Taylor and the best of them to speak?”

The first collected edition of Beaumont and SHADWELL'S “BURY FAIR.' In this play, produced in 1689, Act I. and poems of William Cartwright in 1651.

Fletcher's plays appeared in 1647; the plays scene i., Oldwit is made to say :

The latter died in 1643, aged thirty-two, "I myself, simple as I stand here, was a wit in student of Christ Church, where he is buried. the last age: I was created Ben Jonson's son, in the The Taylor mentioned above is, no doubt, his maid Joan. Well, I shall never forget him; I the actor Joseph Taylor, of the Globe and have supped with him at his house on the Bank- Blackfriars Theatres. He is mentioned in side: he loved a fat loin of pork of all things in the list prefixed to the First Folio Shakethe world. And Joan his maid had her beer-glass speareasone of the twenty-six principal actors, of sack; and we all kissed her, i' faith, and were

playing possibly, among other parts, Hamlet as merry as passed." As Thomas Shadwell was born about 1640 Shadwell's favourite dramatist Ben Jonson,

and lago. He acted also in the plays of he may well have heard much concerning and in those of Beaumont and Fletcher. Jonson, who died three, and John Fletcher,

Dryden, in his defence of the Epilogue to fifteen years before his birth; and in the his great ten - act play "The Conquest of above quotation we get, perhaps, the Christian Granada.' derides, in his majestic way, the name of the “wench" who, according to John Aubrey (i. 96. ed. Clark), was associated with species of would-be wits of which Oldwit is the great Twin Brethren, Beaumont and Restoration excel those of the last age;

a notable specimen. The comedies of the Fletcher, in that wonderful household on the Banke Side.” Surely the Bankside “not fellows who value themselves on their acquaintance

and this will be denied by none, but some few old far from the Play-house" was the Bohemia with the Black Friars; who, because they saw their with a sea-coast we wot of, and Father plays, would pretend 'a right to judge ours. The Thames did duty as understudy for Neptune ! memory of these grave gentlemen is their only plea Francis Beaumont is, indeed, not mentioned for being wits. They can tell a story of Ben Jonson, in the above extract, but he had died in 1616 and, perhaps, have had fancy enough to give a -the year of Shakespeare's death-where- supper in the Apollo, that they might be called his

sons; and, because they were drawn in to be laughed upon Joan may have remained with the at in those times, they think themselves now surviving partner.

sufficiently entitled to laugh at ours. Learning I

never saw in any of them; and wit no more than Henry Aas as a brother of John Longe, and they could remember. In short, they were unlucky is not certain if the name of Longe is a to have been bred in an unpolished age, and more unlucky to live to a refined one. They have lasted patronymic or only an appellation of the beyond their own, and are cast behind ours; and individual's stature, nor does he give the not contented to have known little at the age of Christian name of the man who married twenty, they boast of their ignorance at three Agnes, the supposed sister of Bishop Wykescore.

ham. Moreover, there seems to be no record It is in this essay, while condescendingly that William of Wykeham was ever known contrasting the Elizabethan drama with that by the name of William Longe. This account, of his own day, to the disadvantage of the therefore, of Bishop Wykeham's parentage former-that he says

is by no means conclusive. “Shakespeare showed the best of his skill in his It is shown in the account of Bishop WykeMercutio ; and he said himself, that he was forced ham in the ‘D.N.B.' that to kill him in the third act, to prevent being killed by him. But, for my part, I cannot find he was so

he was not the great architect he had been almost dangerous a person, I see nothing in him but what universally considered, that he made no mark as a was so exceeding harmless, that he might have statesman, and the list of his books does not point lived to the end of the play, and died in his bed, to any superfluity of learning.” without offence to any man.

Bishop Lowth states that he does not appear But elsewhere his praise of Shakespeare is to have studied at any university, and therenoble and discriminating; and the modern fore had no academical degree. reader of Dryden's heroic plays may echo What could have been the cause, then, of “without offence" the author's own lines in such a man as this (apparently the son of the Prologue to 'Aureng-Zebe,' where he says quite humble parents, and not endowed he himself “ grows weary of his long-loved by nature with extraordinary talent nor by mistress, Rhyme." Whence it appears that education with great learning) rising to so Glorious John had seen fit to revise the high a position in the State as he did, amassopinion given by Neander, his counterpart, ing sufficient wealth to build and endow the in 'An Essay of Dramatic Poesy,' that, great school at Winchester and a college at blank verse being too low for tragedy, riming Oxford during his lifetime, and to leave at couplets are the only wear suitable for heroic his death ample estate to establish the family plays. And, indeed, the blank verse of 'All who adopted the name of Wykeham in place for Love' is a great relief after the perpetual of their own? jingle of 'Aureng-Zebe' or The Conquest I venture to suggest that the true parentage of Granada,' fine though the lines generally of Bishop Wykeham has not yet been disare. The mental ear aches with the damned closed, and that John Longe and Sibilla his iteration ": the fatal facility of the poet gives wife were the foster-parents of the bishop, no rest to his readers.

and not his actual father and mother—that In the same essay he makes his Eugenius Wykeham was not his family name. (Lord Buckhurst) contrast our satirist There are several Wykehams mentioned in Cleveland” with Donne. The former gives the bishop's will, but except those who were

common thoughts in abstruse words; to born Perots and adopted the name of Wykeexpress a thing hard and unnaturally is his ham, he calls none of them cousins, as he new way of elocution.” A. R. BAYLEY. does the descendants of Henry Aas and John

and Alice Archemore, nor does he go beyond

the generic term “cousin " or " kinsman” in WILLIAM OF WYKEHAM.

speaking of any of his supposed relations. Who were the parents of William of Bishop Lowth says: Wykeham, Bishop of Winchester 1367-1404,

“We must allow Wykeham to have been what founder of Winchester College and of New the Romans call Novus homo, so with regard to his College, Oxford ? The account of the Bishop surname he might be strictly and literally the first of Winchester in the 'Dictionary of National of his fanıily.” Biography' is doubtless the latest we have of A nothus would be the first of his family, him, and there it is stated that his parents and there appear to be so many difficulties were John Longe and Sibilla Bowade his in deciding to what fainily Bishop Wykeham wife, the same as recorded by Bishops Lowth belonged, that it is doing him no injustice if and Moberly.

we suppose him to have been a nothus. No Bishop Lowth is doubtful as to the exact- fault of his if he was such. Bishop Lowth ness of the account he gives of Bishop also says :Wykeham's family, for in the chart pedigree “Conscious to himself that his claim to honour contained in his life of Wykebam he names was unexceptionable, as founded upon truth and

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