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PREFACE TO THE FIFTH EDITION.

In preparing this edition the whole subject matter has been carefully criticised and amended. The chapter on “Food,” however, has received especial attention, and a number of important changes have been made. These apply particularly to the proportions of the “milk mixtures” employed in hand-feeding, are the outcome of constantly increasing experience in this method of rearing infants, and, in the author's opinion, add materially to the usefulness of the book.

LOUIS STARR.

1818 Rittenhouse Square,

PHILADELPHIA, March, 1896.

The sheets of this, the fourth, edition of the Hygiene of the Nursery have been thoroughly revised and altered wherever necessary to keep abreast with the advances constantly being made in the methods of managing infants and children.

The author would call especial attention to a new process of preparing and preserving cow's milk, known as “ Pasteurization," which now, for the first time, finds a place in the “Hygiene.” This is a simple method of sterilization at a low temperature and without pressure that is far superior to, and more universally applicable than, the old process of “Sterilization" at a high heat under pressure, which, while a great advance at the time of its discovery and of marked value under proper conditions, has been too indiscriminately employed, either to the disappointment of the physician and parents, or to the distinct detriment of the infant's health-a most serious result.

LOUIS STARR. 1818 Rittenhouse Square,

PHILADELPHIA, December, 1893.

viii

PREFACE TO THE FIRST EDITION.

Having a firm belief in the proverb that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure,” the author has endeavored, in the succeeding pages, to point out a series of hygienic rules which, if applied to the nursling, can hardly fail to maintain good health, give vigor to the frame and so lessen susceptibility to disease.

He feels, too, that intelligent parents are ever ready to be instructed and willing to coöperate in the great work of preventing disease—the highest aim of scientific medicine.

While every woman of ordinary brain-power can do much to keep her baby well, she should recognize that years of training and experience are necessary to acquire the ability to put the full value upon symptoms, and to handle the tools of medicine. Therefore, little or no reference has been made to drugs or methods of medical treatment. The first chapter is written with the object of hinting to the mother when, by deviations from the features of health, she may expect the onset of disease and call in professional counsel. The last is offered, not as a complete guide to the practice of physic, but simply for the sake of giving information upon questions that often arise in the nursery.

The child's doctor, in our day, regulates his patient's diet, clothing, bathing and exercise, and looks into the hygiene of the nursery before he orders medicines, and if the mother has sound ideas upon these subjects she is no mean assistant.

The author's thanks are due to Dr. W. M. POWELL for efficient aid in the preparation of the manuscript and index, and to Dr. ALLEN J. SMITH for the illustrations.

LOUIS STARR.

PHILADELPHIA, September, 1888.

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