Working Free: The Origins and Impact of New Zealand's Employment Contracts Act

Front Cover
Auckland University Press, 1997 - Law - 327 pages
The Employment Contracts Act (1991), a key component of the structural reforms that have taken place in New Zealand since 1984, is discussed internationally as a model for designing new labour laws. The Act repudiated collective action and bargaining, rejecting almost a century of practice, and transformed unions and workplace relations. In this volume, an American lawyer who has spent several visits to New Zealand studying labour issues, tells how the ECA was passed, analyzes its performance as labour law, a matter of widespread disagreement, and explores its economic, social and legal impact.
 

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Contents

The Present The Future
1
How the Employment Contracts Act Came to
11
A Sketch of New Zealand Labour Law up to 1987
13
The Campaign for Freedom
26
The Campaign to Eliminate the LRA 19871990
39
The 1990 Election CampaignUnions Prepare for Change
62
Drafting and Introducing the Employment
88
In the Shadow of the ECA
115
Bargaining and Bargaining Representatives
194
Party status and Workplace Access
214
Contracting and Duress
230
Impasse and Partial Lockouts
252
Collectivity Free Choice and Schism
267
MultiEmployer Bargaining
287
Who Owns the Job? Work Unions Society Law and Justice
304
Statutory Citations
316

The General Strike That Never Was
136
The Debate in Parliament
152
Life Under the Employment Contracts Act 10 The ECA and Its Economic and Social Impacts
167
An Introduction to ECA Bargaining
186

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About the author (1997)

Ellen J. Dannin is a professor at the California Western School of Law.

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