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1863.] QUARTERLY LITERARY ADVERTISER. 37

JAMES NISBET AND GO.

Are Preparing for Publication:

i. BISHOP WILSONS JOURNAL-LETTERS; addressed to Us Family

during the First Nine Years of his Indian Episcopate. Edited by bis Son, the Rev. DANIEL WILSON, MJL, Vicar of Islington and Rural Dean. Tost Svo.

II. THE REBELLION IN AMERICA. By Baptist Wriothesley Noel,

M.A. Post 8vo.

HI.

EZEKIEL; or, the Prophet of Fire. By the Rev. J. R. Macduff, D.D., Author of 'The Faithful Promlser,' 'Morning and Night Watches,' &c. *c Post 8vo.

IV. A MEMOIR OP GENERAL STONEWALL JACKSON. Prom

Authentic Documents. By ROBERT 1.. DABNEY, D.D, Professor of Systematic Theology, Virginia. Post Svo.

EXPOSITIONS OP GREAT PICTURES. By Richard Henry Smith,

.Tun., Author of ' Expositions of the Cartoons of Raphael.' Illustrated by Photographs. Crown Svo.

VI.

CAPERNAUM, AS THE SPHERE OP CHRIST'S MIRACLES AND MINISTRY. By the Rev. A. MOODY STUART, Author of 'The Song of Songs," The Three Marys,' .vc. &c Crown 8vo.

VII.

THE POOT OP THE CROSS. By Octavius Winslow, D.D., Author of' Help Heavenward,''The Precious Things of God,' &c. k<\ lilmo.

VIII. THE CHRONICLES OP A GARDEN. By the late Miss "Wilson,

Authoress of' Little Things,' &c With Illustrations. Crown Svo.

IX.

WOMAN AND HER SAVIOUR IN PERSIA. By the Author of

'Dr. Grant and the Mountain Nestorialis.' With Illustrations. Post svo.

X.

THE OLD HELMET. By the Author of 'The Wide, Wide World,'

• The Golden Ladder,' &c. Crown svo.

XI.

THE SANDAL-WOOD TRADER. A Tale of the Pacific. By R. M. BALLANTYNE, Author of • The Young Fur Traders,' • The Wild Man of the West," &c With Coloured Illustrations. Post Svo.

XII.

FROM SCYLLA TO CHARYBDIS. By Melbourne Hollings. Post Svo.

XIII.

MABEL'S EXPERIENCE; or, Seeking and Finding. A Tale for Youth. By MARION ELIZA WEIR, Author of 'Patience to Work and Patience to Wait,'' Holidays at the Cottage.' &c 45c Crown 8vo.

XIV.

WANDERING HOMES. By the Author of 'The Physician's Daughters.' Dedicated to the Young Wives and Daughters of Officers iu the English Army. Post Svo.

XV.

ST. PAUL AS A MIRROR OF THE MANIFOLD GRACE OF

GOD. By W. F. BESSF.R, D.D. Translated by Fiikiiehic Bultmakx, Missionary of the C.M.S. With a Preface by the Rev. J. S. Howsox, D.D., Principal of the Collegiate Institution, Liverpool. I tilicatetl to the Rev. Henry Venn. Post 8vo.

XVI.

CHINESE SCENES AND PEOPLE. With Notices of Christian

Missions and Missionary Life, in a Scries of Letters from various parts of China. By JANE R. EDKINS. With n Narrative of a Visit to Nankin, by her Husband, the Kev. Joseph Edkixs, B.A, of tie London.Misslonary Society, Pckin. Crown Svo.

LONDON : JAMES NISBET & CO., 11, BERNERS STREET, W.

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'A Mine of Natural History Wealth.'—TnE Zoologist.

Thi» Day, with Map «ih1 Forty Illiutrationj. 2 Tola. IW 810. 28*.
THE

NATURALIST

OX

THE RIVER AMAZONS.

With

ADVENTURES AND STUDIES OP NATURAL HISTORY

DURING ELEVEN YEARS OF TRAVEL.

BY H. W. BATES.

* These volumes arc replete with interest and novelty from the beginning to the end. The jathless wilds of virgin forest, their exuberance of beauty and variety, their damp warm moisture, and their extraordinary wealth of insect life, are all reproduced in these pages, and make one. feel as if one had almost seen and known for himself the scenes which the author lias described. Mr. Bates has made every naturalist greatly his debtor. He obtained during his ldhg and self-denying exile specimens of nearly 15,000 species, more than bOOO of which were new to science.'—Brit. Quarterly. ''Wc can truly say that it has never "been our fortune to meet with such a mine of Natural-History wealth. A kindly spirit, an entire truthfulness, a power of exact observation, and a plain and unoniamentcd yet easy and eloquent style, are tho characteristics of every page; and we cannot resist the temptation this passing notice affords us of offering a tribute of thanks to Mr. Darwin, without whose strenuous recommendation we might possibly have lost for ever an invaluable contribution to the Natural History of the Great Father of Waters.'—Zoologist.

'A book of great value. Very fas

cinating it is, nor could we point to any page which is not full of lively interest. Mr. Dates belongs to the small class of men who deserve the earnest gratitude, not only of their own country, but of the civilized world.'—Spectator.

'Mr. Bates, whose character as an entomologist is familiar to all our readers, has here presented us with the results of eleven years' explorations in the wild and little known regions of tropical South America. The book is written in a terse and pleasing style, and is profusely illustrated. The keenness of his powers of observation appears to rival even that of the great Humboldt, for we can hardly conceive of the existence of anything in the vast Amazon region which has not in some manner been alluded to. While passing over his pages, we became almost insensible to surrounding objects, and well nigh fancied we were wandering through the mighty forests of Brazil, surrounded by the humming insects and gaudyplumagcd birds, whose natural history the author has so vividly portrayed. It has never been our lot to divide the pages of a more interesting or instructive work, and we heartily recommend it to all our readers.'—1'opular Science Sev.

JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET.

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Messrs. Walton and Mabcrly announce for Publication, on the 30fVt of November, 1863, in Demy 8ro., Part I., price 2s.f of

A HISTORY OF THE WORLD,

FROM THE EARLIEST RECORDS TO THE PRESENT TIME.

By PHILIP SMITH, B.A.,

One of the Principal Contributors to the Dictionaries of Greek and Roman Antiquities, Biography.

iui.1 Geography.

SINCE Sir Walter Raleigh solaced his imprisonment in the Tower by the composition of his 'History of the World,' the Literature of England has never achieved the work which he left unfinished. There have been 'Universal Histories,' from the bulk of an encyclopaedia to the most meagre outline, in which the annals of each nation are separately recorded; but ■without an attempt to trace the story of Divine Providence and human progress in one connected narrative. It is proposed to supply this want by a work, condensed enough to keep it within a reasonable size, hut yet so full as to be free from the dry baldness of an epitome, and aiming at an organic unity of design.

The story of our whole race, like that of each separate nation, has 'a beginning, a middle, and an end.' That story we propose to follow, from its beginning in the sacred records, and from the dawn of civilization in the East—through the successive Oriental Empires—the rise of liberty and the perfection of heathen polity, arts, and literature in Greece and Rome—the change which passed over the face of the world when the light of Christianity sprung up—the origin and first appearance of those barbarian races which overthrew both divisions of the Roman Empire—the annals of the States which rose on the Empire's ruins, including the picturesque details of mediaeval history and the steady progress of modem liberty and civilization—and the extension of these influences, by discovery, conquest, colonization, and Christian missions, to the remotest regions of the earth. In a word, as separate histories reflect the detached scenes of human action and suffering, our aim is to bring into one view the several parts which assuredly form one great whole, moving onwards, under the guidance of Divine Providence, to the unknown end ordained in the Divine purposes.

The more striking facts of history—tho rise and fall of empires—the achievements of warriors and heroes—tho struggles of peoples for their rights and freedom—the conflict between priestcraft and religious liberty—must needs stand out on the canvas of such a picture with the prominence they claim in tho world itself. But they will not divert our attention from tho more quiet and influential working of science and art, social progress, and individual thought—the living seed sown, and the fruit borne, in the field broken up by those outward changes.

While special care will bo bestowed on those periods and nations, the history of which is scarcely to be found in any works accessible to the general reader, tho more familiar parts of history will be treated in their due proportion to the whole work. It will be found, we trust, by no means the least valuable part of the scheme, that the portions of history which are generally looked at by themselves—those, for example, of Greece and Rome, and of our own country—will be regarded from a common point of view with all the rest; a view which may, in somo cases, modify the conclusions drawn by classical partiality and national pride.

The spirit of the work—at least if tho execution is true to the conception—will he equally removed from narrow partisanship and affected indifference.

No puins will be spared to make this history scliolarlike in substance and popular in style. It will be founded on the best authorities, ancient and modern. The vast progress recently made in historical and critical investigations, the results obtained from the modern science of comparative philology, and the discoveries which have laid open new sources of information concerning the East, afford snch facilities as to make tho present a fit epoch for our undertaking.

The Work will be divided into three Periods, each complete in itself, and will form Eight Volumes in Demy Octavo. 1.—Ancient History, Sacred and Secular; from the Creation to the Fatl of the Western Empire, in

A.U. 476. Two Volumes. 11.—Mkiji.t-v Al History, Civil and Ecclesiastical; from the Fall of the Western Empire to the taking of

Constantinople by the Turk*, in A.D. WA3. Two Volumes. HI.—Modern History; from the Fall of the Byzantine Empire to our own Times. Four Volumes.

It will be published in Monthly Parts, at 2s.; and Half-Yearly Volumes, at Vis. 6<f., cloth lettered.

LONDON: WALTON AND MABERLY,

UPPER GOWKR STREET, AND IVY LANE, rATEfCJOSTER ROW.

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CONTENTS OF NUMBER II.

I. PAINTING IN FRANCE; THE SAXON OP 1863. BY P. G. HAMERTON, E^'i-
II. CATALOGUE OP DRAWINGS BY N. POUSSLN IN THE EOYAL COLLECTION. BY THE
EDITOR.

III. THE RETORT OP THE COMMISSION ON" THE ROYAL ACADEMY. BY TOM TAYLOR, FSQ.

IV. HENRIETTA DROWxVs « SISTERS OF MERCY,' BY THE REV. PROFESSOR K1NGSLEY.
V. THE PRETTY AND THE BEAUTIFUL. BY F. T. PALGRAVE, ES<i.

VI. ART EXHIBITION IN LONDON. BY W. M. R08SETTI, ESQ.
VII. ARCHITECTURE AS A DECORATIVE ART. BY J. B. ATKINSON, ESQ.
VIII. WHO WAS FRANCESCO DA BOLOGNA? BY A. PANIZZI, ESQ.
IX. WILLIAM MULREADY. BY F. G. STEPHENS, ESQ.
X. ART IN AMERICA. BY J. J. JARVIS, ESQ.

XI. CATALOGUE OK THE WORKS OF C. VISbCHER (CONTINUED). BY WM. SMITH, ESQ.
XII. CORRESPONDENCE.

XIII. FINE ARTS RECORD. BY W. M. ROSSETTI, ESQ.

XIV. PUBLICATIONS RELATING TO THE FINK ARTS.

XV. RECENTLY PUBLISHED ENGRAVINGS. [October IM.

Tnrs Periodical is Intended to meet the requirement* of Ciller tors. Connoisseur*, and all who are interested iu liii- cultivation of the Kim- Arts. It will treat of Painting, Sculpture, and Engraving; of 1'holography, so far a* it is employed a* a substitute fur 1 'rawing and Engravlug; and of Ornamental acd Decorative Art.

The Illustration of the History of Art, nnd of its various Scliools, from original monuments aad records; and of the I.Ives of Artists of every country—but iiarticularly of our own—with their wort*, will be ooe conspicuous object of this lie view.

Another will l>e the historical and critical Description of Galleries, Collections, and Special Kxhibiii*>cu. of Works of Art; and of l*ictures, Sculptures, &c, deserving separate notice. inscriptive Catalogs** of the choicer portions of celebrated labile and Private Collections will also be given.

Important Works on the Fine Arts will be reviewed at length; and a complete List of all PuMtcattr** on these subjects, in every language, usually accompanied by abort accounts of their content* and \atoe. will be given in every number. .Recently published Engravings will also be periodically noticed.

1'rucitcnl improvement* in the materials and processes employed In the Klne Arts, in the method* «od appliances of Art-Instruction, and in the application of the Arts of I*esign to 1 decorative and Onuuurcul Purposes, will be fully described.

Illustrations, iu various styles of Kngraving, and in Photography, will be given whenever they are required.

Each iiuniVr will contain a Chronicle of Sales, Meetings of Fine-Art Association*, AcquisitioBs t*y l*tiblic Institutions, and uf all events interesting to levers ot the Fine Arts. And space will be s#i apart to enable Cor respondents to proteose lutiuiries lor Iniomuulon; or to place on recoid isolated or minute Facta, worthy oi being remembered.

Articles and Notices will be authenticated by the names of their Authors, or of Uie Contributors tnsk whom they are received.

Editor— D. D. WOODWARD, F.S.A.. Librarian in Ordinary to the Queen, and Keeper of Print* and Drawings, Windsor Castle.

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CHAPMAN & HALL, 103, PICCADILLY.

To whose care all Communicaiwns nnd W'url.s for Review iliouhl he addrtned.

1*6X] QUARTERLY LITERARY ADVERTISER. 41

Chapman and Hull's Announcement

OF NEW WORKS.

ANTHONY TROLLOPE'S NEW NOVEL.
In 2 vols, post 8vo.

RACHEL RAY. By Anthony Trollope. lOctoW-,- nth.

In small post 8vo.

THE POCKET-BOOK OF DATES. By W. L. R. Cates.

[/» Ociober. In 1 vol. demy 8vo.

THE LIFE OF LAURENCE STERNE. By Percy Fitz

GERALD, M.A., M.K.I.A. [In December.

In 1 vol. demy 8vo.

THE LIFE OF GENERAL WOLFE. By R. Wright.

[In December. In 1 vol. post 8vo.

CURIOSITIES OF INDO-EUROPEAN TRADITION AND

FOLK LORE. By WALTER K. KELLY. [In November.

Iu 1 vol. post 8vo., with Illustrations.

SPORT IN NORWAY AND WHERE TO FIND IT. By

M. K. BARNARD. [/» November.

Iu 1 vol., demy 8vo., with Illustrations.

THROUGH MACEDONIA TO THE ALBANIAN LAKES.

By MARY ADELAIDE WALKER. [In December.

DYCE'S SHAKESPEARE.
A new cditiou in the press, to be completed in 8 volumes, demy 8ro.

THE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE. Edited by the Rev.

ALEXANDER DYCE.

This edition is not a mere reprint of that which appeared in 1857. On the contrary, it will present a text very materially altered and amended from beginning to eud, with a large body of criticnl notes almost entirely new, and with a glossary, iu which the language of the poet, his allusions to customs, &c, will be fully explained.

To be published every alternate month. Vol. I. will be ready in November.
In 3 vols. fcap. 8vo.

ROBERT BROWNING'S POETICAL WORKS. New

Edition.
Vol. I., Is., contains LYRICS, ROMANCES, MEN AND WOMEN.
Vol. II., 8f, contains TRAGEDIES and OTHER PLAYS.

Vol. III., It. 6tt, contains SORDELLO, CHRISTMAS EVE and EASTER DAY, and PARACELSUS.

In 3 vok. fcap. 8vo.

PLAYS AND POEMS. By Henry Taylor, Author of' Philip

Van Artevelde,' 'St. Clement's Eve,' &c. [In December.

In 1 vol. post Svo.

THE ENGLISH AT HOME. By Alphonse Esquiros.

Third Series. [Now Ready.

CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY.

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