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Moore's intimacy with Washington

Irving, 170.
Moraines of glaciers, 81.
Mustard-tree of the New Testament, 70.

N.

Narcissus, Mahomed's ' food of the soul,'
237.

Nasmyth hammer, 298.

Negroes in the United States, condition
of, 146 — different condition in our
tropical dependencies, 147.

Neve' on the surface of glaciers, 92.

Niebuhr's belief in the miracles of the
New Testament, 200.'

Nile, source of the, 274—ancient expe-
ditions to discover it, 275 — Hero-
dotus's account of the river, 276—
hydrography of Ptolemy and Eratos-
thenes, 277—old maps agreeing with
modern discoveries, 278—modern ex-
plorations, ib.—beneficial effect of the
configuration of Central Africa, 280
—expansion and contraction of its
lakes, 281—description of Lake Nyan-
za, 282 — considerations respecting
mercantile enterprise, 284 — tribu-
taries, 285.

, remains found in the sediments

of the, 384.

Nyanza Victoria (Lake), position of,
279—description of it, 282.

Oak, superstitions attached to the, 223
—of Mam re, 230. (See ' Sacred trees.')

Oratorio, origin of the word, 264.

Ordination, anecdotes of examination
for, 543.

Ostrich's alleged want of m-opyii, 56.

Palestine, zoology of, 44.

Passaglia's petition to the Pope to resign
temporal power, 497. (See ' Roman
Church.')

Passion flower, the, 248.

Peat, its growth unequal, 379.

Philip II. (of Spain), his laborious life,
514—compared to a spider, ib.

Pius IX., his violent explosions of
temper, 490.

Plymouth Breakwater, 305.

Porteus (Bishop of London), princely
fortune bequeathed by, 545—built or
endowed no church in the metropolis,
ib.

Portland Breakwater, 305 — wall con-
structed in the sea, 306.

Ports, ancient Roman, 304.

'Progress,' Shakspere's use of the word
as a verb, 203.

Publishers and authors, natural historv
of, 175.

Puszta or Steppes of Hungary, descrip-
tion of, 11.

Pyramid of Cheops, its expense at a
shilling a cubic foot, 308.

Quadra (de\ the Spanish minister at
Elizabeth's court, 525. (See ' Eliza-
beth' and 'Cecil.')

Quails of the Bible, various opinions
on, 68.

R.

Railways, steep gradients of, 324—great
roofs at stations, 326.

Rappists, the, 419.

Regelation, discovery of the property
of, 89.

Reichsrath, debates in the Austrian, 40.

Rendu's (M.) priority in recognising
the 'pliability ' of glaciers, 112.

Rizzio (David), an intriguing Italian
politician, 534—intimacy with Mary,
ib.—parentage of James attributed to
him by Randolph, ib.—murdered, ib.

Roads, Roman, 312.

Robin, Breton legend respecting the,
231.

Rochdale Pioneers, 424—their determi-
nation not to take or give credit, ib.
division of profits among purchasers,
427—part of the profits devoted to
educational purposes, 430—Corn-mill
Society ,431—erection of a cotton-mill,
432—withdrawal of profits from the
workpeople, 433. (See ' Co-operative
Societies.')

Roman Church, Italian desire of change
in the, 481—Italian pamphlets on its
state, t'6.—the Passaglianists, 482—
imaginary picture of Rome after the
abolition of the temporal power, 483
—vacancy of fifty sees, 487—diffi-
culty in the appointment of bishops,
488—the Statute, the festival of Ita-
lian nationality, 489—despotic cha-
racter of the Papal system, 490—
whisper of' death to the priests,' 492
—deplorable state of the clergy in
general, ib.—almost all of the lower
classes, 493—Passaglia's proposal for
raising their character, 494—instances
of superstition, ib.—monastic orders
even lower than Becular clergy, 495
—Papal policy irreconcilably hostile

to Italian liberty and unity, 496—
petition to the Pope to resign tem-
poral power signed by 9000 priests,
497—associations of the liberal clergy,

498 — the temporal sovereignty re-
garded as the essence of the Papacy,

499 — society 'for reclaiming the
primitive Catholic rights of the Ita-
lian clergy and laity,' 500—unfitness
of the missions from the Plymouth
Brethren and the Free Kirk of Scot-
land, 51—unwise Protestant propa-
gandism, 502—unfitness of a naked
Protestantism for Italy, 503—Anglo-
Continental Society, 504—objects of
its operations in Italy, ib.—nature of
the reforms needed in the Italian
Cliurch, 507—conversion of Father
Felix, 508—two styles of controversy
with Roman Catholics, 509—reform
required in the English Church in
Italy, ib.

Home (ancient), different opinions on
the population of, 270.

, present state of, 250—innume-
rable beggars, 255—Beppo. king of
the beggars, 256—Christmas holidays
and ceremonies, 257—exhibition of
the Bambino, 258—Roman Lent, 260
—shows during the Holy Week, 262
—prescription for the hot season,
263 — theatres, 264 — ecclesiastical
dramas, ib.—epigram on the French
occupation, 267.

Romowe, the old sacred centre of the
Prussians, 226.

Rose, an ecclesiastical emblem, 238—
a mystic flower in Germany and
Scandinavia, ib.—the flower of mar-
tyrs, 239—an emblem of the Virgin,
to.

of England (white), Pliny's al-
lusion to, 238.

Ruminating power ascribed to the coney
and hare, 57.

Russell's (Scott) improved lines in ship-
building, 301.

Sacred trees and flowers, 210—the palm,
fig, and vine types of the mystical
tree of life, 213—legend respecting
the date-palm, 214—the tree of life
a date-palm on early Roman mosaics,
ib.—in old French churches, 215—
ideas represented by the pine or
cedar, 216—Aryan names for the fir
and oak, 217—oak and cedar repre-
sentatives of supernatural strength
and power, ib.—oaks of Cadzow and

Dartmoor, 218—the oak and mistle-
toe, 219—the oak dedicated especially
to Thor, 221—heathen ceremonies
under great trees, ib.—trees of saints,
222—the great Shire-oak and Crouch-
oak, ib.—King Charles's oak, 223—
Celtic reverence for the ash, 224—
the ash the sacred tree of Scandi-
navia, 225—legends on the orchis,
wood-sorrel, and white thorn, 231—
the aspeu and elder, 233—flowers de-
dicated to the Virgin, 234—the lily,
235—the rose of England, 238—the
rowan or mountain ash, 243 — the
passion flower, 248.

St. John's wort, legend respecting, 240.

St. Leonard's forest, legend of, 237.

Saussure (de) on glaciers and other
phenomena of the Alps, 85.

Savings-banks (Post-office), effects of,
429.

Scandinavian mythology, 224.

Schmerling's geological explorations,
387.

Scott's (Sir Walter) services to Wash-
ington Irving, 166—character drawn
by Irving, 167.

Shakers (the), 419.

Shamrock (the), 246.

Shark (white), able to swallow a man
whole, 53.

Ships, increase in the size of, 302—iron
masts and yards, 303—stone ships,
306.

Shire-oak (the great) shadowing three
counties, 222.

Shittim-wood, 72.

Slovacks, the industrial Scots of Hun-
gary, 34.

Smeaton's the best form of lighthouses,
310.

Smiles's 'Biographies of Engineers,'
330.

Smith (Dr. George, Bishop of Victoria),
on the State of Japan, 463, 477.

Smith's (Dr. William) 'Dictionary of
the Bible,' 43.

Smith's (Sydney) raillery of Bishop
Blomfield, 553.

Spain (court of) under Philip II. the
centre of European politics, 513,

Species, transmutation of, 412.

Spirit-rapping, inquiry into the origin
of the knocking language, 191—the
old-fashioned ghost superseded by the
Poltergeist, 193 — specimen of the
rappings of an illiterate ' spirit,' 205.

Spiritualism, modern, 179—grotesque
and ludicrous ' manifestations,' 182—
law of gravitation suspended in favour
of tables only, 184—brandy and beer

drinking spirits, 186—muscular im-
mortality of the spirits, 189—sus-
picious circumstances attending the
seances, 191—incarnation of hands
by the spirits 'out of the vital
atmospheres of those present,' 193
— American manifestations, 201 —
doggrel purporting to emanate from
the Saviour, t'6.—superior sensibility
of the Yankee nervous system, 202
■—ghosts of Bacon and 'Sweeden-
borg,' 202—writing mediums, 207.

Stanley's (Canon)' Life of Bishop Stan-
ley of Norwich,' 538 — frank and
loveahle character of Bishop Stanley,
570—his real unfitness for the epis-
copate, io.—his notion of' liberal sen-
timents' in the Church, to.— dis-
avowal of belief in the apostolic
succession, 571.

Stature, earliest European races of
small, 395.

Statuto, the festival of Italian nati-
onality, 488.

Steam-engine the greatest mechanical
triumph of man, 295.

Stone ships, 306.

Story's 'Koba di Roma,' 250—statue of
Cleopatra, ift.—blunders in language
and history, 252. (See ' Rome.')

Strikes, mistaken notions leadiug to,
423.

Stuarts, the oak the ' suiacheantas' of
the, 223.

Suez, ship canal of, 327.

Swiss lakes, ancient dwellings on piles
in, 379.

Table-turning, 1N4—Mr. Faraday's ex-
planation of, 209. (See 'Spirit-rap-
ping ' and ' Spiritualism.')

Tasca's (Count) services in the reli-
gious enlightenment of Italians, 505.

Telegraph, electric, 329.

Thomson's (Dr.) 'The Land and the
Book,' 48.

Trieste the centre of Austrian maritime
trade, 36.

Tristram's contributions to the orni-
thology of the Holy Land, 7fi.

Tunnels for English railways, 80 miles
of, 322—great tunnel under Mount
Cenis, 294.

Tyndall's (Dr.) experiments, 116—ser-
vices to glacial science, 121.

U.

Unicorn of Scripture, mistake respect-
ing, 52.

W.

White-thorn, superstition attached to
the, 232.

Whitworth's gauges and measuring
machines, 299.

Wilson's (Bishop of Calcutta) Life br
his Son-in-law, 538—his character,
545—sketch of his life, 546.

Wines, analysis of Hungarian, Si-
French wine manufactured without
the juice of the grape, ft.

Wordsworth's (Dr.) 'Tour in Italy,'
484.

Yggdrassil, the tree of the world, 224
—the sacred ash of Northern Europe,
226.

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