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ESSENTIALS OF PRACTICE OF

PHARMACY

ARRANGED IN THE FORM OF

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS.

FRZDAD ESE ECIALLY FOR

PHARMACEUTICAL STUDENTS.

(SECOND EDITION, REVISED.)

BY

LUCIUS E. SAYRE, PH. G.,

PROFESSOR OF PHARMACY AND MATERIA MEDICA, OF THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY OF

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS.

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925 WALNUT STREET.

Entered, according to Act of Congress; in the year 1890, by

W. B. SAUNDERS,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington, D. C.

COPYRIGHT, 1894, W. B. SAUNDERS.

PRESS OF
W. B. SAUNDERS,

PHILA.

198 527 1894

PREFACE TO SECOND EDITION.

(REVISED.)

The present edition contains a complete revision of the text of the former book, and this text is made to correspond with the United States Pharmacopæia of 1890. There have been also numerous additions made, notably: An Outline of Drug and Plant Analysis, Structural Formulæ of Organic Carbon Compounds used in Medicine, Pharmaceutical Testing of Inorganic Chemicals, and Problems in Allegation and Specific Gravity. For these problems and answers I am indebted to Mr. S. R. Boyce, Assistant in Pharmacy in the School of Pharmacy of the University of Kansas. His use of the book in the class-room has convinced him of the importance of this addition in meeting the practical needs of the student.

L. E. S.

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PREFACE.

This little volume has been written at the request of a few friends who claim some knowledge of my method of presenting pharmaceutical topics, in a tangible form, to the students as Quiz-master. Facing a class with a set of questions made to suit the hour, is a very different thing from writing a compend embracing a series of questions in proper sequence and logical order, such as will comprehend the subject in hand. If this little work fails to accomplish this object, the author feels inclined to say to his disappointed friends that herein lies the cause.

The motto of the student is, in these days of intense activity, get all you can in the shortest time. The author suggests here the old proverb:

Get what you can, and what you get, hold,

'Tis the stone which will turn your lead into gold.” One of the objects of this book is to assist the student in holding the instruction he receives in the study of pharmacy. On the other hand, it is to open up and map out the subject to the young student in a way that is comprehensible and easily followed. In doing this the Pharmacopæia has been strictly adhered to, and only when felt driven to do so, has the author turned aside from this standard. He believes in making the Pharmacopoeia the central figure in pharmaceutical study. If the student familiarizes himself with that book, he becomes capable of branching into directions of scientific study for which he finds ample help in text-books.

The author has followed a classification which differs in a

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