“A” History of England: From the First Invasion by the Romans, Volume 7

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A. and W. Galignani and Company, 1840 - Great Britain

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Page 223 - I, AB, do declare and believe, that it is not lawful upon any pretence whatsoever to take arms against the king, and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person or against those that are commissioned by him : So help me God.
Page 362 - I, AB, do declare, that it is not lawful, upon any pretence whatsoever, to take arms against the king : and that I do abhor that traitorous position of taking arms by his authority against his person, or against those that are commissioned by him...
Page 75 - that have forced me to do this. I have sought the Lord both day and night, that he would rather slay me, than put me on the doing of this work.
Page 283 - This pillar was set up in perpetual remembrance of the most dreadful burning of this Protestant city, begun and carried on by the treachery and malice of the Popish faction, in the beginning of September, in the year of our LORD 1666, in order to the carrying on their horrid plot for extirpating the Protestant Religion, and old English Liberty, and introducing Popery and Slavery.
Page 256 - ... enable him to exercise, with a more universal satisfaction, that power of dispensing which he conceived to be inherent in him...
Page 75 - For a few seconds, apparently in the most violent agitation, he paced forward and backward, and then, stamping on the floor, added, " You are no parliament ; I say you are no parliament ; bring them in, bring them • in," Instantly the door opened, and Colonel Worsley entered, followed by more than twenty musketeers. "This," cried Sir Henry Vane, "is not honest ; it is against morality and common honesty.
Page 75 - At first his language was decorous, and even laudatory. Gradually he became more warm and animated; at last he assumed all the vehemence of passion, and indulged in personal vituperation. He charged the members with self-seeking and profaneness; with the frequent denial of justice, and numerous acts of oppression; with idolizing the lawyers, the constant advocates of tyranny; with neglecting the men who had bled for them in the field, that they might gain the Presbyterians who had apostatized...
Page 380 - ... ordering all coffee-houses to be shut up ; " because in such houses, " and by the meeting of disaffected persons in them, " divers false, malicious, and scandalous reports were " devised and spread abroad, to the defamation of his " majesty's government, and the disturbance of the " quiet and peace of the realm.
Page v - That all writs, processes, commissions, patents, grants, and other things, which now run in the name and style of the keepers of the liberty of England by authority of Parliament...
Page 163 - Lord, though I am a miserable and wretched creature, I am in Covenant with Thee through grace. And I may, I will, come to Thee, for Thy People. Thou hast made me, though very unworthy, a mean instrument to do them some good, and Thee service; and many of them have set too high a value upon me, though others wish and would be glad of my death; Lord, however Thou...

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