The Works of Samuel Parr, ...: With Memoirs of His Life and Writings, and a Selection from His Correspondence,

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green., 1828

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Page 138 - WHAT slender Youth bedew'd with liquid odours Courts thee on Roses in some pleasant Cave, Pyrrha for whom bind'st thou In wreaths thy golden Hair, Plain in thy neatness? O how oft shall he On Faith and changed Gods complain : and Seas Rough with black winds and storms Unwonted shall admire : Who now enjoys thee credulous, all Gold, Who always vacant, always amiable Hopes thee ; of flattering gales Unmindful. Hapless they To whom thou untried seem'st fair. Me in my vow'd Picture the sacred wall declares...
Page 128 - Wherefore, if the gentleman's son be apt to learning, let him be admitted ; if not apt, let the poor man's child that is apt enter his room.
Page 313 - Tracts by Warburton and a Warburtonian, not admitted into the collections of their respective works," itself a collection which our shelves could ill spare, though maliciously republished by Dr.
Page 75 - ... and passengers by many foolish acts ; such as riding in high prelatical pomp through the streets on a black saddle, bearing in his hand a long cane or wand, such as women used to have, with an ivory head like a crosier, which was probably the reason why he liked it:" We see by this he was already thinking of the bishopric.
Page 122 - ... his resentment, be it just or unjust. But the minds of children are open to impressions of every sort; and, indeed, wonderful is the facility with which a judicious instructor may habituate them to tender emotions. I have, therefore, always considered mercy to beings of an inferior species as a virtue which children are very capable of learning, but which is most difficult to be taught if the heart has been once familiarized to spectacles of distress, and has been permitted either to behold the...
Page 410 - But the souls of the righteous are in the hand of God, and there shall no torment touch them. In the sight of the unwise they seemed to die: and their departure is taken for misery. And their going from us to be utter destruction: but they are in peace.
Page 697 - The wheels of nature are not made to roll backward ; every thing presses on towards eternity ; from the birth of time an impetuous current has set in, which bears all the sons of men towards that interminable ocean. Meanwhile heaven is attracting to itself whatever is congenial to its nature, is enriching itself by the spoils of earth, and collecting within its capacious bosom whatever is pure, permanent, and divine, leaving nothing for the last...
Page 325 - And though you must suppose that, in that stormy weather, he was more than half-boots over, he kept his seat and dismounted safely, when the ark landed on Mount Ararat. Image now to yourself this illustrious Cavalier mounted on his hackney : and see if it does not bring before you the Church, bestrid by some lumpish minister of state, who turns and winds it at his pleasure. The only difference is, that Gog believed the preacher of righteousness and religion."— pp.
Page 125 - Or plain and perfect way of teaching children to understand, write, and speak the Latin tongue ; but specially purposed for the private bringing up of youth in gentlemen and noblemen's houses ; and commodious also for all such as have forgot the Latin tongue, and would by themselves without a schoolmaster, in short time, and with small pains, recover a sufficient hability to understand, write, and speak Latin.
Page 127 - That he thought it not indifferent so to order the matter ; for,' said he, ' poor men's children are many times endued with more singular gifts of nature, which are also the gifts of (rod, as, with eloquence, memory, apt pronunciation, sobriety, and such like ; and also commonly more apt to apply their study, than is the gentleman's son, delicately educated.

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