The Revised Statutes of the United States: Relating to Commerce, Navigation and Shipping, with References to the Decisions of the Federal Courts Construing Them, Together with the Regulations Promulgated by the Secretary of the Treasury in Accordance Therewith, and a Full Collection of Forms

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S. Whitney & Company, 1880 - Commercial law - 449 pages
 

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Page 24 - Whenever, as in the case of small vessels under way during bad weather, the green and red side lights cannot be fixed, these lights shall be kept at hand, lighted and ready for use : and shall, on the approach of or to other vessels, be exhibited on their respective sides in sufficient time to prevent collision, in such manner as to make them most visible, and so that the green light shall not be seen on the port side nor the red light on the starboard side, nor, if practicable, more than two points...
Page 25 - Lights required for other Vessels ; but shall, if they do not carry such Lights, carry a Lantern having a Green Slide on the One Side, and a Red Slide on the other Side ; and on the Approach of or to other Vessels, such Lantern shall be exhibited in sufficient time to prevent Collision, so that the Green Light shall not be seen on the Port Side, nor the Red Light on the Starboard Side. Fishing Vessels and open Boats when at Anchor, or attached to their Nets and stationary, shall exhibit a bright...
Page 8 - That no bill of sale, mortgage, hypothecation, or conveyance of any vessel, or part of any vessel of the United States, shall be valid against any person other than the grantor or mortgagor, his heirs and devisees, and persons having actual notice thereof; unless such bill of sale, mortgage, hypothecation, or conveyance be recorded in the office of the Collector of the Customs where such vessel is registered or enrolled...
Page 22 - ... so constructed as to show a uniform and unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light ten points on each side of the ship, namely, from right ahead to two points abaft the beam...
Page 284 - ... contains, to the best of my knowledge and belief, a just and true account of all the goods, wares, and merchandise, including packages of every kind and nature whatsoever, which...
Page 24 - Ships, whether steamships or sailing ships, when at anchor in roadsteads or fairways, shall, between sunset and sunrise, exhibit where it can best be seen, but at a height not exceeding twenty feet above the hull, a white light in a globular lantern of eight inches in diameter, and so constructed as to show a clear uniform and unbroken light visible all around the horizon, and at a distance of at least one mile.
Page 302 - ... or other circumstances, shall render it probable that such vessel is intended to be employed by the owner or owners to cruise or commit hostilities upon the subjects, citizens, or property, of any foreign prince or State, or of any colony, district, or people, with whom the United States are at peace...
Page 23 - ... light, so constructed as to show an unbroken light over an arc of the horizon of twenty points of the compass, so fixed as to throw the light ten points on each side of the vessel, namely, from right ahead to two points abaft the beam on either side, and of such a character as to be visible at a distance of at least five miles.
Page 113 - No wages due or accruing to any seaman or apprentice shall be subject to attachment or arrestment from any court, and every payment of wages to a seaman or apprentice shall be valid in law, notwithstanding any previous sale or assignment of wages or of any attachment, encumbrance, or arrestment...
Page 107 - Mexico, or of any vessel of the burden of 75 tons or upward, bound from a port on the Atlantic to a port on the Pacific, or vice versa...

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