The Letters of Gustave Flaubert: 1830-1857

Front Cover
Harvard University Press, 1980 - Literary Criticism - 250 pages
1 Review
Flaubert wrote to his mistress, Louise Colet - 'An author in his book must be like God in the universe, present everywhere and visible nowhere'. In his books, Flaubert sought to observe that principle; but in his many impassioned letters he allowed his feelings to overflow, revealing himself in all of his human complexity. Sensuous, witty, exalted, ironic, grave, analytical, the letters illustrate the artist's life - and they trumpet his artistic opinions - in an outpouring of uninhibited eloquence. Throughout this exposition in Flaubert's own words of his views on life, literature, and the passions, readers of his novels will be powerfully reminded of the fertility of his genius, and delighted by his poetic enthusiasm. 'Let us sing to Apollo as in ancient days', he wrote to Louise Colet, and breathe deeply of the fresh cold air of Parnassus; let us strum our guitars and clash our cymbals and whirl like dervishes in the eternal hubbub of forms and ideas.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JayLivernois - LibraryThing

Reading letters of writers can often be tiring because of a lack of narrative surrounding it. However, a good editor can give a collection context and can make a book of letters interesting reading ... Read full review

Contents

THE BILLIARD TABLE THE COLLEGE
1
THE
13
BREAKDOWN TRAVEL MOURNING
21
LOUISE COLET I
43
VOYAGE EN ORIENT
99
MADAME BOVARY
141
PUBLICATION TRIAL TRIUMPH
217
Appendix I
237
Works of Related Interest
246
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information