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" There is no reason why a mind thus wandering in ecstasy should count the clock, or why an hour should not be a century in that calenture of the brain that can make the stage a field. The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses, and know,... "
Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopędia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory, and N ... - Page 3
by John Mason Good - 1819
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Miscellaneous and Fugitive Pieces, Volume 2

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1774
...Extnfy fliould count the Clock, or why an Hour fliould not be a Century in that Calenture of the Brains that can make the Stage a Field. The Truth is, that the Spectators are always in their Senfes, and know, from the firft Aft to the laft, that the Stage is...
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The Dramatick Writings of Will. Shakspere: With the Notes of All ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1788
...circumspections of terrestrial nature. There is no reason \\ hy a mind, thus wandering in ecstacy, should count count the clock ; or why an hour should not be a century in that calenture of the brains that can make the stage a field. The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses,...
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Elegant Extracts: Or, Useful and Entertaining Passages in Prose, Selected ...

Vicesimus Knox - English prose literature - 1790 - 1019 pages
...There is no reafon why a mind thus wandering in ecltacy, mould count the clock ; or why an hour ihould not be a century in that calenture of the brain that can make the ftage a field. The truth is, that the fpectators are always in their fenfes, and know, from the firft...
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The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History, Politics, and Literature for ...

History - 1793
...There is no. reafon why a mind thus wandering in ecftafy ihould count the clock, or why an hour ihould not be a century in that calenture of the brain that can make a ftage a field. The truth is, that the fpectators are always in their fenies, and know, from the frit...
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The Critical and Miscellaneous Prose Works of John Dryden ..., Volume 1, Part 2

John Dryden - 1800 - 596 pages
...may despise the circumscriptions of terrestrial nature. There is no reason why a mind thus wandering in ecstasy should count the clock, or why an hour should not be a century in that calenture of the brains that can make the stage a field. " The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses,...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson

Samuel Johnson - Biography - 1801
...There is no reafon why a mind thus wandering in ecftacy mould count the clock, or why an hour mould not be a century in that calenture of the brain that can make the ftage a field. The truth is, that the fpectators are always io their fenfes, and know, from the firft...
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Annual Register, Volume 8

History - 1802
...is no reafon why a mind, thus wantiering in tcllafy, Ihould count the clock, or why an hour ihuuld not be a century in that calenture of the brain that can make a liage a field. The truth is, that the fpeaator>” are always in their fenle*, and know, from the...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: Accurately Printed from the Text ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1803
...may despise the circumscriptions of terrestrial nature. There is no reason why a mind thus wandering in ecstasy should count the clock, or why an hour should not be a century in that calenture of the brains that can make the stage a field. The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses,...
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The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

Samuel Johnson - English literature - 1806
...II. K circumscriptions of terrestrial nature. There is no reason why a mind thus wandering in ecstacy should count the clock, or why an hour should not...can make the stage a field. The truth is, that the spectators are always in their senses, and know, from the first act to the last, that the stage is...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With Notes of Various Commentators, Volume 1

William Shakespeare - 1806
...may despise the circumscriptions of terrestrial nature. There is no reason why a mind thu» wandering in ecstasy should count the clock, or why. an hour should not be a century in that calenture of the brains that can make the stage a field. The truth is, that the spectators are always in their censes,...
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