Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1999 - Philosophy - 184 pages
An imaginative and exciting position of themes from Wittgenstein's Philosophical lnvestigations, this book helps readers find their way around the "forest of remarks" that make up this classic. Chapters on language, mind, color, number, God, value, and philosophy develop a major theme: that there are various kinds of language use -- a variety philosophy needs to look at but tends to overlook.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I already reviewed this book on Amazon. But, since it had such a profound impact on me I decided to review it here as well. The following is copied from my amazon review...
2 of 3 people found
the following review helpful:
1.0 out of 5 stars Just exactly what was the point?, May 12, 2006
By James Nassan (Berkely, CA) - See all my reviews
WPI Review
Of all the exegesis on Wittgenstein's work, this one suffers the greatest lack of clarity. Anyone who wishes to understand Wittgenstein should steer clear of Brenner's work. Speaking from an experienced vista (a student in Brenner's class) the material covered in Brenner's WPI and his course at ODU is unnecessarily difficult to understand. The combination of irrelevant commentary from other sources and awkward language makes this book one for the recycling pile. The review on the back by Cora Diamond would lead one to believe this work offers some kind of insight that cannot be obtained elsewhere. I would advise the reader to continue looking.
As other readers who left comments suggest, this book is a lackluster example of Wittgenstein. If you are interested in learning about Wittgenstein there are other sources with a mainstream analysis availble. This book tends to be vaguely written and isn't devoid of making presumptuous claims that cannot be substantiated. In other words, the work is largely composed of opinion that is not in correspondence with the major scholars of Wittgenstein.
 

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE PHILOSOPHICAL INVESTIGATION
9
Language
12
Logic and Philosophy
23
Following a Rule
32
Mind
42
Thought
53
Kinaesthesia
77
SENSATION AND THE SOUL
93
The Soulless Tribe
100
COLOR AND NUMBER
117
Arithmetic as Grammar
127
GOD
139
Religions Language and Ethics
148
CONCLUSION
157
BIBLIOGRAPHY
163

Aspect Perception
78
Concept Formation
84
The Concept of the Soul
91

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

William H. Brenner is Associate Professor of Philosophy at Old Dominion University.

Bibliographic information