Democracy's Privileged Few: Legislative Privilege and Democratic Norms in the British and American Constitutions

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Yale University Press, 2007 - Law - 307 pages
Why should a developing country surrender its power to create money by adopting an international currency as its own? This comprehensive book explores the currency problems that developing countries face and offers sound, practical advice for policymakers on how to deal with them. Manuel Hinds, who has extensive experience in real-world economic policy-making, challenges the myths that surround domestic currencies and shows the clear rationality for dollarization or the use of a standard international currency. The book opens with an entertaining story of the Devil who, through a series of common macroeconomic manoeuvres, coaches the President of a mythical country into financial ruin and purchases its entire assets for $1.50. The path this ruler took is one taken by several developing countries and has resulted in financial crises and political upheaval. Hinds goes on to introduce new ways of thinking about financial systems and monetary behavior in Third World countries. He provides an essential, incisive guide not only to making currency decisions but also to executing them successfully.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Lex Parliamenti vs Lex Terrae
27
2 Political Questions and Nonjusticiability
49
3 Free Speech in Parliament
68
4 Free Speech in Congress
87
5 Freedom from Civil Arrest and Legal Process for Members of Parliament
111
6 Freedom from Civil Arrest for Members of Congress
134
7 Disputed Parliamentary Elections
144
8 Disputed Congressional Elections
162
9 Breach of Privilege and Contempt of Parliament
193
10 Punishment by Congress
207
Conclusion
236
Notes
241
Index
295
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