Collection of English Almanacs for the Years 1702-1835

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Page 11 - Thus saith the Lord, which giveth the sun for a light by day, and the ordinances of the moon and of the stars, for a light by night, which divideth the sea when the waves thereof roar ; the Lord of Hosts is his name.
Page 17 - Henry I, Stephen, Henry II, Richard I, John, Henry III, Ed-ward I, Edward II, Edward III, Richard II, Henry IV...
Page 27 - The chase of birds and beasts, the several arts of fishing, with all the different kinds of agriculture, are necessary scenes of business, and give employment to the greatest part of mankind. If we look into the brute creation, we find all its individuals engaged in a painful and laborious way of life, to procure a necessary subsistence for themselves, or those that grow up under them.
Page 11 - The golden zones of heaven; to some she gave To weigh the moment of eternal things, Of time, and space, and fate's unbroken chain, And will's quick impulse; others by the hand She led o'er vales and mountains, to explore What healing virtue swells the tender veins Of herbs and flowers...
Page 11 - Imprints a different bias, and to each Decrees its province in the common toil. To some she taught the fabric of the sphere, The changeful moon, the circuit of the stars, The golden zones of heaven; to some she gave To weigh the...
Page 9 - He that hath a froward heart findeth no good : and he that hath a perverse tongue falleth into mischief.
Page 26 - Yes, you eat and drink, and run about upon it, that is, you enjoy it as a brute ; but to enjoy it as a rational being, is to know it, to be...
Page 6 - In short, whoever resides in the world without having any business in it, and passes away an age without ever thinking on the errand for which he was sent hither, is to me a dead man to all intents and purposes : and I desire that he may be so reputed.
Page 11 - And all the fair variety of things. . But not alike to every mortal eye Is this great fcene unveil'd. For fince the claims...
Page 15 - Midsummer Day. — The Exchequer opens eight days before any term begins, except Trinity, before which it opens but four days.

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