A Text-book of Pharmacology, Therapeutics and Materia Medica

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Lea brothers & Company, 1885 - Electronic books - 1035 pages
 

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In a nutshell, a text book published in 1885 on Pharmacology, is of little to no value to me today. I'm not sure who thought this was the best they could do for a loyal long-term Google customer. Quite simply put . . . dreadful.
With sincere regrets,
Daryl Makarenko

Contents

Oxidation of Protoplasm
77
Ferments Organic and Organized
83
Yeasts
89
Mode of Experimenting on the Action of Drugs on the Reproduction of Bacteria
97
Action of Bacteria and their Products on the Animal Body
103
CHAPTER IV
109
Action of Drugs on Annulosa
115
Contraction of Muscle
117
Tetanus
123
Connection between Chemical Constitution and Physiological Action in Muscle
130
Hypothetical Considerations regarding the Action of Drugs on Muscle
136
Irritation of Motor Nerveendings
143
Action of Drugs on Reflex Action
151
Opposite Conditions Produce Similar Effects
157
Stimulating Action of Drugs on the Reflex Powers of the Cord
163
Depressant Action of Drugs on Motor Centres in the Brain
171
Drugs which Lessen the Functional Activity of the Brain
178
Adjuncts to Anodynes
184
Mode of Administering Anĉsthetics
190
CHAPTER IX
196
Action of Drugs on the Intraocular Pressure
202
Action of Drugs on the Respiratory Centre
214
Pulmonary Sedatives
220
Action of Drugs on the Expulsive Mechanism
227
Fainting and Shock
230
Alterations in Bloodpressure
236
Investigation of the Action of Drugs on the Arterioles
243
Action of Drugs on Vasomotor and Vasodilating Nerves
248
Causes of Alteration in Bloodpressure and Pulse Rate
257
Palpitation
263
Action of Drugs on its Muscular Substance
269
Theories Regarding the Mode of Action of Drugs on the Heart
275
Drogs which Act on the Vagus Centre
279
General Considerations regarding the Heart
285
Therapeutic Uses of Drugs acting on the Circulation
291
Vascular Tonics
297
Cardiac Sedatives
299
Vesicants
305
CHAPTER XIII
310
Excretion by the Saliva
315
Action of Drugs on the Movements of the Stomach
321
Gastric Sedatives and Antiemetics
328
Constipation
335
Uses of Purgatives
343
Hepatic Stimulants
350
Hĉmatinics
357
CHAPTER XV
364
Mode of Action of Diuretics
372
Excretion by the Sweat Glands
379
Urinary Sedatives and Astringents
385
Echolics
391
Cold Pack
398
Hot Foot Bath
402
Objections to Hypodermic Injections
408
Application of Drugs to the Stomach
414

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Page 313 - ... reaches the rectum and produces purgation. 6. Purgation will not ensue if water be withheld from the diet for one or two days previous to the administration of the salt in a concentrated form. 7. The absence of purgation is not due to the want of water in the alimentary canal, but to its deficiency in the blood. 8. Under ordinary conditions, with an unrestricted supply of water, the maximal amount of fluid accumulated within the canal corresponds very nearly to the quantity of water required...
Page 190 - As nitrous oxide in its extensive operation appears capable of destroying physical pain, it may probably be used with advantage during surgical operations in which no great effusion of blood takes place.
Page 54 - The irrational practice of giving infinitesimal doses has of course nothing to do with the principle of homoeopathy — similia similibus curantur : the only requisite is that mentioned by Hippocrates, when he recommended mandrake in mania ; viz., that the dose be smaller than would be sufficient to produce in a healthy man symptoms similar to those of the disease.
Page 452 - Acid be put into a small flask with a few pieces of Granulated Zinc, and while the effervescence continues, a slip of bibulous paper wetted with Solution of Subacetate of Lead be suspended in the upper part of the flask above the liquid for about five minutes, the paper will not become discoloured...
Page 863 - Characters and Tests. — Pale grey, amorphous, without smell, but, even in the most minute quantity, powerfully irritating the nostrils ; strongly and persistently bitter, and highly acrid; insoluble in water, soluble in spirit, in ether, and in diluted acids, leaving traces of an insoluble brown resinoid matter.
Page 805 - Characterğ and Tests. — A colourless powder, soluble in water, forming a solution which is neutral to test-paper, and when applied to the eye dilates the pupil as the solution of atropia does. It leaves no ash when burned with free access of air. Intended for external application.
Page 463 - A nearly colorless, syrupy liquid, odorless, having a very acid taste and an acid reaction. Sp. gr. 1.212. It is freely miscible with water, alcohol, and ether, but nearly insoluble in chloroform. It is not vaporized by a heat below 160° C. (.320° F.; ; at higher temperatures it emits inflammable vapors, then chars, and is finally entirely volatilized, or leaves but a trace of residue. When diluted with water, Lactic Acid should afford no precipitate with testsolutions of nitrate of silver...
Page 766 - Quinoidin, — a mixture of alkaloids, mostly amorphous, obtained as a by-product in the manufacture of the crystallizable alkaloids from Cinchona.
Page 679 - Characters. — Irregular lumps, weighing from four ounces to two pounds ; enveloped in the remains of poppy leaves, and generally covered with the chaffy fruits of a species of rumex ; when fresh, plastic, tearing with an irregular slightly moist chestnut-brown surface, shining when rubbed smooth with the finger, having a peculiar odour and bitter taste.
Page 668 - ... acids, and precipitated from them by the caustic alkalies, but not by carbonate of ammonia or the bicarbonates of soda or potash. It melts with heat, and burns with a smoky flame, leaving no residue when burned with free access of air.

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