The Standard Fourth Reader: With Spelling and Defining Lessons, Exercises in Declamation, Etc. Part two

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J. Shorey, 1870 - Readers - 336 pages

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Contents

Catiline Denounced by Cicero
32
Turning Away Wrath
34
Last Days of Madame Roland
37
Caius Gracchus to the Romans
40
Remarkable Providence
43
The Teachers Vocation LORD BROUGHAM
45
The Simpleton and the Rogues
47
Reply to Lord Lyndhurst R L SHIEL i
54
Anecdotes of a Skylark
58
The Paths of Success
61
The Americans not to be Conquered JOHN WILKES 24 A Magpie at Church
70
On the Treatment of Books
72
The Good Time Coming CHARLES MACKAY
75
Speech ot biack Hawk
76
Catiline Expelled Cicero
79
The Custom of Dueling
80
The Keeping of the Bridge LORD MACAULAY
87
The Highest Cataract in the World T S KING 32 Special Exercises in Elocution Part I
91
LESSON PAGE 33 The Second War with England Brows
95
Sunrise on Mount Etna P BRYDONE
97
The Death of Marmion Sir Walter Scott
100
Where is
102
HENRY NEELE
103
Marco Bozzaris FitzGREENE HALLECK
104
On Reconciliation with America LORD CHATHAM 39 I will Try
108
The Two Homes FELICIA HEMANS
113
Warrens Address John PIERPONT
114
Arnold the Teacher
115
The Good Great Man S T COLERIDGE
118
The Immortality of the Soul MASSILLON
119
Brevities Exercises in Level Delivery
121
The Dying Trumpeter JULIUS MOSER
126
Rolla to the Peruvians R B SHERIDAN 127
127
True Glory MATTHEW GREENE
128
The Village Clergyman and Teacher OLIVER GOLDSMITH
131
Oliver Goldsmith WASHINGTON IRVING l The Summons and the Lament
134
Pibroch of Donuil Dhu Sır WALTER Scott
135
Coronach SIR WALTER SCOTT
136
The American Flag J R DRAKE
141
The Battle of Ivry LORD MACAULAY
146
Joan of Arc THOMAS DE QUINCEY 56 In Favor of American Independence SAMUEL ADAMS
148
William Tell among the Mountains J S KNOWLES
150
Birth of a Volcanic Island D C WRIGHT
153
The American Robin Miss Coopen 67 The Study of Natural History
172
Lines to Little Mary CAROLINE B SOUTHEY
177
Prayer JAMES Thomson
180
Woman in America DANIEL WEBSTER 72 Christopher Columbus WASHINGTON IRVING
182
The Story of Ginevra SAMUEL ROGERS
183
Influence of Human Example
187
Americas Obligations to England Isaac BARRE
189
Right Against Might
191
Special Exercises in Elocution Part II
195
Special Exercises from Shakspeare
198
Catiline to his Troops Rev Geo CroLY
200
Song of Hiawatha H W LONGFELLOW
201
Catos Soliloquy JOSEPH ADDISON
206
Marullus to the Mob SHAKSPEARE
207
Barbarity of War REV T CHALMERS
208
The Prussian General on the Rhine
210
Last Charge of Ney J T HEADLEY
211
Cause for Indian Resentment WM WIRT
215
The Fall of Constantinople AUBREY DE VERE
222
The Boy Crusaders
226
Allens Capture of Ticonderoga G BANCROFT
235
Mans Immortality WM PROUT
236
William the Silent J L MOTLEY
239
Going up in a Balloon CHARLES DICKENS 105 Early History of Kentucky
254
Sonnet J BLANCO WHITE
264
Brutus on the Death of Csar SAAKSPEARE
267
Marie Antoinette EDMUND BURKE
270
Dr Arnold at Rugby Thomas HUGHES
271
Hannibal to his Army Livy
274
Results of the American War C J Fox
277
Waterloo Lord BYRON
280
Love is Power ROBERT CHAMBERS
282
Be Just
289
Special Exercises in Elocution Part III
291
Columbus Discovers the New World WASHINGTON IRVING
298
How to Have what we Like HORACE SMITH 1
300
My Fathers Log Cabin DANIEL WEBSTER
302
Importance of Habit SAMUEL SMILES
303
Address to an Egyptian Mummy IIORACE SMITI
307
The Winds W C BRYANT
316
Address of Caradoc the Bard Sin E B Lytton
332
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Page 131 - The broken soldier, kindly bade to stay, Sat by his fire, and talked the night away; Wept o'er his wounds, or tales of sorrow done, Shouldered his crutch, and shewed how fields were won.
Page 267 - Romans, countrymen, and lovers, hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear. Believe me for mine honour, and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe. Censure me in your wisdom, and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Caesar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Caesar was no less than his.
Page 186 - Thy waters wasted them while they were free, And many a tyrant since ; their shores obey The stranger, slave, or savage ; their decay Has dried up realms to deserts ; — not so thou, Unchangeable save to thy wild waves' play, Time writes no wrinkle on thine azure brow, Such as creation's dawn beheld, thou rollest now.
Page 330 - This was the noblest Roman of them all: All the conspirators save only he Did that they did in envy of great Caesar; He only, in a general honest thought And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle, and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, 'This was a man!
Page 328 - Death, that hath suck'd the honey of thy breath, Hath had no power yet upon thy beauty: Thou art not conquer'd; beauty's ensign yet Is crimson in thy lips and in thy cheeks, And death's pale flag is not advanced there.
Page 281 - And there was mounting in hot haste: the steed, The mustering squadron, and the clattering car, Went pouring forward with impetuous speed, And swiftly forming in the ranks of war...
Page 333 - With a bare bodkin ? who would fardels bear, To grunt and sweat under a weary life, But that the dread of something after death, The undiscover'd country from whose bourn No traveller returns, puzzles the will, And makes us rather bear those ills we have Than fly to others that we know not of ? Thus conscience does make cowards of us all...
Page 331 - By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash By any indirection...
Page 316 - When that the poor have cried, Caesar hath wept: Ambition should be made of sterner stuff; Yet Brutus says he was ambitious; And Brutus is an honourable man. You all did see that on the Lupercal, I thrice presented him a kingly crown, which he did thrice refuse: was this ambition?
Page 186 - And I have loved thee, Ocean ! and my joy Of youthful sports was on thy breast to be Borne, like thy bubbles, onward : from a boy I wantoned with thy breakers — they to me Were a delight : and if the freshening sea Made them a terror — 'twas a pleasing fear, For I was as it were a child of thee, And trusted to thy billows far and near, And laid my hand upon thy mane — as I do here.

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