Hints on Agricultural Subjects: And on the Best Means of Improving the Condition of the Labouring Classes

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J. Johnson and B. Crosby and Company, 1809 - Agriculture - 387 pages

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Page 329 - Man, like the gen'rous vine, supported lives; The strength he gains is from th' embrace he gives. On their own axis as the planets run, Yet make at once their circle round the sun; So two consistent motions act the soul; And one regards itself, and one the whole. Thus God and nature link'd the gen'ral frame, And bade self-love and social be the same.
Page 343 - CD, and their fellows, justices of our said lord the King, assigned to keep the peace of our said lord the King...
Page 175 - The profits and advantages of carrots are in my opinion greater than any other crop. This admirable root has, upon repeated and very extensive trials for the last three years, been found to answer most perfectly as a part substitute for oats. Where ten pounds of oats are given per day, four pounds may be taken away; and their place supplied by five pounds of carrots.
Page 343 - HB esquires, and others their associates, justices of our said Lord the King, assigned to keep the peace in the said county, and also to hear and determine divers felonies, trespasses, and other misdemeanors in the said county committed, by the oath of...
Page 311 - Meeting, or otherwise, to dissolve or determine such Society, so long as the Intents or Purposes declared by such Society, or any of them, remain to be carried into Effect, without obtaining the...
Page 273 - ... not the least cloud upon it which proved that no moisture then arose from the earth. The evaporation from the ploughed land was found to decrease rapidly after the first and second day, and ceased after five or six days, depending on the wind and sun. These experiments were carried on for many months. After July the evaporation decreased, which proves that though the heat of the atmosphere be equal, the air is not so dense. The evaporation, after the most abundant rains, was not advanced beyond...
Page 60 - stating the great profit of carrots. I have found by the experience of the last two years, that where eight pounds of oat-feeding was allowed to draft horses, four pounds might be taken away and supplied by an equal weight of carrots ; and the health, spirit, and ability of the horses to do their work be perfectly as good as with the whole quantity of oats. With the drill husbandry and proper attention, very good crops of carrots may be obtained upon soils, not generally supposed suitable to their...
Page 263 - The expense attending this is considerable, but the value of the rrop amply compensates it. In 1804 I had an acre and a rood, which had been previously occupied by cabbages, and afterwards by tares. The soil was very heavy and strong. The tops of this crop were so abundant, that they would have fed twenty head, of cattle for a m-onth. I began cutting them too late, by which means I lost a great part. It is essentially necessary to get the carrots dry, to enable them to keep. I endeavour, if the weather...
Page 8 - ... sufficient to establish these facts, I should instance, that it requires from five to six hours for a horse to masticate a stone of hay, whilst he will eat a stone of potatoes in twenty minutes, or less. The saving of four hours for rest is alone sufficient to produce the most essential difference in the health and condition of the animal : after great fatigue also, a horse would be tempted to take warm food, when he would not eat hay. As a proof of the excellence of this .food, I have at this...
Page 263 - The seed, ten days or a fortnight before it is used, is mixed with wet sand, and placed in some warm situation, so as to be in a full state of vegetation before it is sown. A fortnight is gained 'by this method, and the carrots are less liable to be injured by the weeds. The plough and harrow are kept at work during the whole summer. The plants are twice hand-weeded, and afterwards thinned. The expense attending this is considerable, but the value of the crop amply compensates it. In 1804 I had an...

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