A Treatise on therapeutics

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J. B. Lippincott & Company, 1887 - 779 pages
 

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Page 505 - The senna leaves vary from three-fourths of an inch to an inch and a half in length, and are to be distinguished by the inequality of their bases, the two sides of the lamina or leaf-blade joining the midrib at unequal heights and angles.
Page i - A Treatise on Therapeutics. Comprising Materia Medica and Toxicology, with Especial Reference to the Application of the Physiological Action of Drugs to Clinical Medicine.
Page vi - Experience is said to be the mother of wisdom. Verily she has been in medicine rather a blind leader of the blind; and the history of medical progress is a history of men groping in the darkness, finding seeming gems of truth one after another, only in a few minutes to cast each back to the vast heap of forgotten baubles that in their day had also been mistaken for verities. In the past, there is scarcely a conceivable absurdity that men have not tested by experience and for a time found to be the...
Page 743 - The application of this principle requires caution, or the practitioner will be led into that chief abomination — polypharmacy. It is worse than futile to attempt to prescribe for every symptom. It is the underlying cause of the disorder or the under-stratum of bodily condition which must be sought out and prescribed for simply. Third. To obtain a special combination, which is really a new remedy, or which experience has shown acts almost as a new remedy. Thus, when to Iodide...
Page 474 - In full doses sanguinaria acts upon man as a harsh emetic, and in overdoses, according to Dr. Tully, it produces, with the vomiting, burning at the stomach, faintness, vertigo, diminished vision, general insensibility, coldness, extreme reduction of the force and frequency of the pulse, together with great irregularity of action and often palpitation of the heart, great prostration of muscular strength, and sometimes a convulsive rigidity of the limbs. Fatal poisoning of several persons occurred...
Page vi - Narrowing our gaze to the regular profession and to a few decades, what do we see ? Experience teaching that not to bleed a man suffering from pneumonia is to consign him to an unopened grave, and experience teaching that to bleed a man suffering from pneumonia is to consign him to a grave never opened by nature. Looking at the revolutions and contradictions of the past, — listening to the therapeutic Babel of the present, — is it a wonder that men should take refuge in nihilism, and, like the...
Page 54 - ... has been well applied. If any inflamed part be unaffected, the solution must be immediately reapplied. Sometimes, even after the most decided application of the nitrate of silver, the inflammation may spread; but is then generally much less severe, and is eventually checked by repeated application. It is desirable to visit the patient every twelve hours, until the inflammation is subdued.
Page 637 - By long standing it deposits a layer of fibrous matter, and becomes more transparent ; this layer should be reincorporated by agitation before the collodion is used. When applied to the skin the solvent evaporates, and it forms a colourless, transparent, flexible and strongly contractile film.
Page 264 - ... expanding, dilating, dissolving into the wide confines of space, overwhelmed by a horrible, rending, unutterable despair. Then, with tremendous effort, I seemed to shake this off, and to start up with the shuddering thought, Next time you will not be able to throw this off, and what then ? Under the influence of an emetic I vomited freely, without nausea, and without much relief. About midnight, at the suggestion of the doctors, I went up-stairs to bed. My legs and feet seemed so heavy I could...
Page 54 - The affected part should be well washed with soap and water, then with water alone, to remove every particle of soap, as the soap would decompose the nitrate of silver; then to be wiped dry with a soft towel. The concentrated solution of four scruples of the nitrate of silver to four drachms of distilled water is then to be applied two or three times on the inflamed surface and beyond it, on the healthy skin, to...

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