The Glory of the Age: An Essay on the Spirit of Missions, Being the Substance of a Discourse Delivered Before the Baptist Missionary Society, Bristol, England

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Loring, 1833 - Missionaries - 191 pages
 

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Page 183 - In thoughts from the visions of the night, When deep sleep falleth on men, Fear came upon me, and trembling, Which made all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face; The hair of my flesh stood up...
Page 40 - ... takes hold also, as with more numerous hands than those given to some of the deities, of all the corrupt principles of the heart. What an awful consideration, that among a race of rational creatures, a religion should be mighty almost to omnipotence by means, in a great measure, of its favourableness to evil ! What a melancholy display of man, that the two contrasted visitants to the world, the one from heaven, the other deserving by its qualities to have its origin referred to hell, — th.at...
Page 156 - Redeemer, was that he should see the travail of his soul ; that he should have the heathen for his inheritance, and the uttermost parts of the earth for his possession...
Page 138 - ... been seen of the heirs of misers. But let us suppose that it will, and suppose, too, that this son will be a man of sensibility and deep reflection. Then, his property will often remind him of his departed father. And with what emotions ? This, he will say to himself, was my father's god. He did, indeed, think much of me, and of securing for me an advantageous condition in life; and I am not ungrateful for his cares. He professed also not to be unconcerned for the interests of his own soul, and...
Page 139 - O would he, if he could speak to me while' I am pleasing myself that they are mine, tell me that they are the price of- my father's soul ? If the rich man in the parable, (that parable being regarded for a moment as literal fact,) might have been permitted to send a message to his relatives on earth, what might we imagine as the first thing which the anguish of his spirit would have...
Page 138 - He professed also not to be unconcerned fcr the interests of his own soul, and the cause of the Saviour of the world. But, alas ! it presses on me with irresistible evidence, that the love of money had a power in his heart predominant over all other interests. It cannot be effaced from my memory that I have often observed the strong marks of repugnance and impatience, an ingenuity of evasion, an acuteness to discover or invent objections to the matter proposed to him, however high its claims...
Page 78 - ... a peculiarity of character which will hardly allow us to look at them without a reference in thought to the points whence the progression began.
Page 87 - consists in a kind of religious fatalism, which would make the objection in some such terms as these; if that Being whose power is almighty, has willed to permit on earth the protracted existence, in opposition to Him, of this enormous evil, why are we called upon to vex and exhaust ourselves in a petty warfare against it ? Why any more than to attempt the extinction of a volcano ? If it were His will that it should be overthrown, we should soon, without having quitted our places and our quiet,...
Page 23 - When following in thought those perpetrators of devastation and carnage, we have the consolation of foreseeing its end. The Caesars and Attilas were as mortal as the millions who expired to give them fame. Of Timour, the language of the Historian, kindling into poetry, relates that " he pitched his last camp at Otrar, where he was expected by the Angel of Death.
Page 91 - ... less therefore than an alliance with His enemy, unless this tolerance is maintained for precisely those reasons, clearly understood, which are His reasons, for permitting it." Besides, what right have you to assume "the continuance of this permission indefinitely into futurity ? When for anything that can be known to you, hostile means put in action at this period may coincide with a Divine decree to terminate that mysterious sufferance ; and then, whatever were the natural inadequacy of those...

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