Worldwired

Front Cover
Random House Worlds, Nov 29, 2005 - Fiction - 416 pages
3 Reviews
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As long as there’s an Earth to defend, Jenny Casey has a job. But she may outlast the world she was custom-built to save. . . . 

Give Canada’s Master Warrant Officer Jenny Casey an inch and she’ll take a galaxy. That’s just the kind of person a world on the brink of destruction needs. The year is 2063, and Earth has been brutalized. An asteroid flung at Toronto by the PanChinese government has killed tens of millions and left the equivalent of a nuclear explosion in its wake. Humanity must find another option. . . . 

Perched above the devastation in the starship Montreal, Jenny is still in the thick of the fray. Plugged into the worldwire, connected to a brilliant AI, her mind can be everywhere and anywhere at once. But it’s focused on the mysterious alien beings right outside her ship. Are they there to help—or destroy? With Earth a breeding ground for treason and betrayal as governments struggle to assign blame, Jenny holds the fate of humankind in her artificially reconstructed hand. . . .

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Isamoor - LibraryThing

Jun11: Characters: The cast doesn't change much for the last book. A few new scientists add a little something, but the old carryovers are great. Plot: A little better than the middle book. Some fun first-contact work and exploration. Some action. Style: Gets it done. Engaging to read. Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 15
175
Section 16
179
Section 17
185
Section 18
209
Section 19
217
Section 20
230
Section 21
241
Section 22
387

Section 9
64
Section 10
71
Section 11
75
Section 12
78
Section 13
94
Section 14
165
Section 23
390
Section 24
399
Section 25
400
Section 26
401
Copyright

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Popular passages

Page 170 - The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks : the long day wanes : the slow moon climbs : the deep moans round with many voices. Come, my friends, 'tis not too late to seek a newer world. Push off, and sitting well in order smite the sounding furrows; for my purpose holds to sail beyond the sunset, and the baths of all the western stars, until I die. It may be that the gulfs will wash us down: it may be we shall touch the Happy Isles, and see the great Achilles, whom we knew. Tho' much is taken, much...
Page 170 - Death closes all: but something ere the end, Some work of noble note, may yet be done, Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.
Page 172 - Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho' We are not now that strength which in the old days Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are; One equal-temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.
Page 373 - I want you to remember that no bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country.
Page 341 - So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong and to strike at what is weak. Water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows; the soldier works out his victory in relation to the foe whom he is facing.
Page 28 - Montreal's variable, lightert nan-earth grav takes some getting used to, but once you get the hang of it it's pretty darn sexy.
Page 183 - You know, it was Einstein who said that imagination is more important than knowledge, because knowledge is limited.
Page 230 - Janet didn't know his name. She didn't want to know his name. She didn't want to...
Page 131 - I don't want to get your hopes up. And I don't want to give you a false impression that I have any control of this situation at all, much as I wish I could do something—

About the author (2005)

Elizabeth Bear was born on the same say as Frodo and Bilbo Baggins, but in a different year. This, coupled with her childhood tendency to read the dictionary for fun, has led inevitably to penury, intransigence, and the writing of speculative fiction. Her hobbies include incompetent archery, practicing guitar, and reading biographies of Elizabethan playmenders.

She is the recipient of the John W. Campbell Award for best New Writer and the author of over a dozen published or forthcoming novels, including the Locus Award-winning Jenny Casey trilogy and the Phillip K. Dick Award-nominated Carnival. A native New Englander, she spent seven years near Las Vegas, but now lives in Connecticut with a presumptuous cat.

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