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Phenomena of Earthquakes . . . . . .
Present Literary Age, The . . . . M. H. Underhill . . . . . 241
Ramblings in the Orient . . . . . . Harry T. Cook . . . . . 362
REVIEWS OF BOOKS.

Longfellow's New England Tragedies, 63. Whittier's Among the Hills, 63. Gladden's Plain
Thoughts on the Art of Living, 63. Osborn's School for Critics, 63. Chatrian's The Conscript,
122. Clarke's Sir Copp and The Two Angels, 122. Luke Darrell, 123, Mabel Ross, 123. The
Broken Pitcher, 123. Bellow's IIow Not to be Sick, 190. Wiftìn's Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered,
190. Boise's Homer's Iliad, 190. The Chaplet of Pearls, 191. Scott's Waverly Novels, 253.
Best's The Planet, 203. Maryatt's Pacha of Many Tales, 253. Gustaker's How a Bride Was
Won, 253. Reed's Voices of the Wind, 251. Southworth's How He Won Her, 317. Auerbach's
Edelweiss, 317. Planchette, 317. Guiccioli's Recollections of Lord Byron, 318. Muhlbach's
Two-Life Paths, 319. Waite's Mormon Prophet, 319. Anerbach's Villa-Eden, 32). Foster's
Mississippi Valley, 382. Colbert's Astronomy, 383. March's Night Scenes in the Bible, 384.
Trench's Realities of Irish Life, 384.

. . 286
. .

. . 197
. .
175, 215,

. . 204
. . 103

Roman Hierarchy, The . . . . . . W. W. k'insley . . .
Scammon, J. Y. and Dearborn Observatory . T. H. Satford . . .
Science, Monotheism and Polytheism . . Thomas Clarke . . .
Secret of Power, The . . . . . . . Agnes Leonaril Scanland
Sketches from Memory. I., II., III. . . Dr. Sideview . . .
Smoking and Anti-Smoking . . . . . Urs. M. L. Rayne . .
Southern California . . . . . . . . G. Brackett . . .
Stolen Loaves, The . . .

. . Horuce Stanton . .
Suffrage . . . . . .

. 8. . Booth .
Telegraphy · · · · ·

. . S. V. Booth .

.
.

. .
Three Darkened Lives, .

. . Mrs. A, M. Freeman
Through Darkness to Light

. . SI. Ledger . .
Utah . . . . . . . . . C. B. Woite . . . .
Vox Populi . . . . . . . . . llorace Stanton . . .
Wayside Gleanings . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Where Does the Water Come From . . Geo. M. Kellogg . . .
Woolen Manufacturing Interests in the West . . . . . . .

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POETRY.

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Away . . . . . . .
Battle Above the Clouds, The ·
By the Sea . . . . . .
Charlemagne's Lament for Roland
Devon Pixies, The . . .
Dreams . . . . . . .
Expedition to Port Royal ..
Innploro Pace . . . . . .
Message of Peace, A ..
Noble Illinois . . . . . .
Pearls of Thought . .
Rudolph and Hermann .
Sweetnesses . . . . .
Violet's Song, The . . . .
Wedded Waters, The . . .

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Stanley Waterloo . . . 289
· Eugene Taylor . . . . . 96
. Vury Jane Taylor . . . . 337

. Charles Landor . . . . . 113
. Mrs. A. P. Sueet . . . . 132
. A. T. Frred . . . . . . 308

Eugene Taylor, ..
. Charles Landor . . .

. 8
đeo. J. Bung . . . . 249
. Viss M. J. Bissett . . . . 273
. . . . . . 43, 117, 185 250, 316

. Miss L. M. Gilbert . . . . 115
. St. Lediger . . . . . 224

Vary E. Brackett . . . . 294
. Mrs. C. Wiltse . . . . 209

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THE

WESTERN, MONTHLY.

VOL. I.-JANUARY, 1869.-NO. 1.

WILLIAM B. OGDEN.

WHERE are few men, among the liv- the stroke of the woodman's axe, and

I ing myriads of the Great West, at numberless were the difficulties they were the present bour, who sustain a more en obliged to surmount, being then full viable reputation among men, or whose sixty miles west of any wagon-road, and record is more brilliant as an earnest, in what was afterwards called, by Gov. seli-sacrificing laborer in promoting the Clinton, the “sequestered section” of growth and progress of the Western the state. Here a settlement was formed, States, than the subject of this sketch - where, though remarkable for neither WILLIAM B. OGDEN, the “Railway King wealth nor numbers, patriotism found a of the West." During the last thirty- home, amid dignified courtesy and genthree years his interests have been close- uine hospitality. ly allied with those of the Northern Mis. It was here that Mr. ABRAHAM OGDEN, issippi Valley, and few men, if any, have the father of the subject of this sketch, accomplished more, or merited and re- was married to a daughter of Mr. JAMES Geired a greater degree of success, in WEED, mentioned above, and where the the development thereof, than has Mr. first years of the life of William were OGDEN; and it is with pleasure that we passed. As a lad, he was large for one herewith submit a brief sketch of his of his years, and, when not more than Successful career, as a business man and ten or twelve years of age, was very fond a philanthropist.

of athletic exercise and the sports of roMr. OGDEx was born in the town of bust boyhood. He always delighted in Walton, Delaware county, New York, hunting, swimming, skating, wrestling, of the 15th day of June, 1805, and is, riding; so much so, that his father had to terefore, now in his 64th year. He is a limit his hunting and fishing excursions member of the Eastern New Jersey fam- to two days of the week. These were Ly of that name. About the year 1790, the sports suited to his “sequestered” his grandfather, who had served in the home; and, if they trespassed too much Revolutionary war, together with several upon his time, it was from no indisposicther officers of the army, including Mr. tion to study, or want of fondness for Javes WEED of New Canaan, Fairfield books. As he grew older, the advice of cubaty, Conn., took their families and his father awakened in him a consciousemigrated to a wild, wilderness region on ness of the necessity of greater applicathe Delaware river, west of the Catskill tion to books and literary pursuits. Mountains, and some eighty miles be. These counsels were not allowed to pass yond the Hudson. It was a great under. unheeded. taking, for the vast, unbroken forest Permission to choose his future occuwhich enveloped them had never echoed pation having been granted by his in.

dulgent father, he determined to acquire a liberal education, and devote himself to the practice of law. No sooner had this determination been made, than, with the decision of character and earnestness which have marked all his subsequent life, he set to work to fit himself for his chosen profession. He had but little more than commenced his academic course, when the sudden prostration of his father's health required him, though only sixteen years of age, to return home and assume control of the business and care of his father's family. It was with no little regret that young Ogden bade adieu to the academic halls; yet he could not hesitate between inclination and duty.

The management of his father's business exacted great activity and energy on the part of its young conductor. It became necessary for him to make fre. quent trips over the country and to large cities, and thus he acquired that taste and inclination for diversified business pursuits, which have rendered his subsequent life one of untiring and diversified activity. Although the duties imposed upon him, as his father's representative in business matters, required great at tention and untiring energy, it did not absorb all his strength. By reading he cultivated his intellect, and his mind be. ing of a strong practical turn, he did not fail to profit by every tour he made. Travel proved to him an efficient educator, enlarging his views, expanding his thought, and increasing his powers; yet, at this time, he had really seen but little of the world. When only twenty. one years old, he was induced to engage as a partner in a mercantile firm, and enlarge his operations. The result, although moderately successful, did not satisfy his young ambition. After spend. ing a few more years in his native county, his unwearied exertions being rewarded only by moderate gains, he determined to turn his attention westward.

Before leaving his native state, Mr.

OGDEN, having arrived at the age of eighteen, when all young men at that time were required to do military duty, entered upon that service. He was elected a commissioned officer the first day of doing duty, and on the second was appointed Aid to his esteemed friend Brig.-Gen. FREDERICK P. Foote, a gentleman long since dead. The late Hon. Selan R. HOBBIE, the distinguished Postmaster-General of the United States for so many years, and from boyhood the intimate friend of Mr. OGDEN, was a member of Gen. Foote's staff at the same time, as Brigade Inspector with the rank of major. Mr. OGDEN Succeeded his friend, Major HOBBIE, in the office of Brigade Inspector, and did his duties for several years preceding his westward journey.

The year before Mr. Ogden's removal to Chicago (1834), he was elected to the Legislature of the State of New York, especially to advocate the construction of the New York and Erie Railroad, and to obtain the aid of the State for that great work, which then commanded his greatest exertions, and in which he has ever since felt a deep interest. He spent the winter of 1834–5 in the Assembly at Albany, but it was not until the following year that aid was granted by the State.

In June, 1835, Mr. OGDEN arrived at Chicago, having then recently united with friends in the purchase of real estate in this city. He and they foresaw that Chicago was to be one of the leading cities of the West, and therefore purchased largely, including Wolcott's Addition, nearly half of Kinzie's Addition, and the block of land upon which the freight houses of the Galena and Chicago Union Railroad now stand.

At first Mr. Ogden's principal business in Chicago was the management of the real estate which he and his friends had purchased; but gradually, and almost accidentally in the beginning, he established a Land and Trust Agency,

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