Irish Seditions : Their Origin and History from 1792-1880: Ireland's Curse - England's Trouble. With Map of Ireland, Indicating the Proclaimed Districts, Volume 8

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Diprose & Bateman, 1881 - Insurgency - 64 pages

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Page 25 - Let no man dare, when I am dead, to charge me with dishonour ; let no man attaint my memory by believing that I could have, engaged in any cause but that of my country's liberty and independence...
Page 24 - You do me honor overmuch. You have given to the subaltern all the credit of a superior. There are men engaged in this conspiracy who are not only superior to me, but even to your own conceptions of yourself, my lord; men, before the splendor of whose genius and virtues I should bow with respectful deference, and who would think themselves...
Page 6 - I think it right to mention that, at this time, the establishment of a Republic was not the immediate object of my speculations. My object was to secure the independence of my country under any form of government, to which I was led by a hatred of England, so deeply rooted in my nature, that it was rather an instinct than a principle.
Page 24 - I am accountable for all the blood that has and will be shed in this struggle of the oppressed against the oppressor — shall you tell me this, and must I be so very a slave as not to repel it? I...
Page 7 - I do further declare that neither hopes, fears, rewards or punishments, shall ever induce me directly or indirectly, to inform on, or give evidence against any member or members of this or similar societies, for any act or expression of theirs, done or made collectively or individually, in or out of this society, in pursuance of the spirit of this obligation.
Page 25 - I do not fear to approach the omnipotent judge, to answer for the conduct of my whole life ; and am I to be appalled and falsified by a mere remnant of mortality here ? By you too, who, if it were possible to collect all the innocent blood that you have shed in your unhallowed ministry, in one great reservoir, your Lordship might swim in it.
Page 23 - ... the grand place of assembly. The evening before, the Wicklow men failed, through their officer. The Kildare men, who were to act, (particularly with me) came in, and at five o'clock went off again, from the Canal harbour, on a report from two of their officers, that Dublin would not act. In Dublin itself, it was given out, by some treacherous or cowardly person, that it was postponed till Wednesday. The time of assembly was from six till nine; and at nine, instead of two thousand, there were...
Page 35 - If they really were a conquered race, they are not the people who ought to announce it. It is the conquerors from whom we should learn the fact, for it is not the conquered who should go about the world and announce their shame and humiliation. But I entirely deny that the Irish are a conquered race. I deny that they are more of a conquered race than the people of any other nation. Therefore, I cannot see that there is any real ground for the doleful tone in which they complain that they are the...
Page 7 - In the awful presence of God, I, AB, do voluntarily declare, that I will persevere in endeavouring to form a brotherhood of affection among Irishmen of every religious persuasion, and that I will also persevere in my endeavours to obtain an equal, full, and adequate representation of all the people of Ireland.
Page 41 - But then, the experience they had about the Irish Arms Bill, last year, must have shown them that a compact body of opponents, though few in number, may, by debating every sentence and word of a bill, and by dividing upon every debate, so obstruct the progress of a bill through Parliament that a whole session may be scarcely long enough for carrying through one measure...

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