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THE

AMERICAN

CATHOLIC QUARTERLY

REVIEW

Bonum est homini ut eum veritas vincat volentem, quia malum est homini ut eum veritas vincat
invitum. Nam ipsa vincat necesse est, sive negantum sive confitentum.

S. Aug. Epist. ccxxxviii. an PASCENT. ,

VOLUME I V.

FROM JANUARY TO OCTOBER, 1879.

PHILADELPHIA:

HARDY & M A HONY,

PUBLISHERS AND PROPRIETORS,

505 CHESTNUT STREET.

PUBLIC LIBRARY

119153
ASTOR, LENOX AND
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS.

1898.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

PAGE
THEORIES OF EDUCATION AND LIFE.—THOMAS CARLYLE. By Rt. Rev.
J. L. Spalding, D.D.,

1

The aim and end of education, 1; Different persons differently affected by wrong-

doing, 2; Examples drawn from education among different nations, 3; The Kuight

and the Monk in the Middle Ages, 5; Education the effort to create the ideal man,

6; The two ways of viewing human life, 7; Philosophy on the unchristian basis, 8;

Carlyle's Pantheism, 10; Scientific Atheism 12; Carlyle on Man's spiritual nature,

14; The results of Atheism as expressed by Mr. Carlyle, 15; His contempt for those

who are called religious, 16; The service he might have rendered the Church, 17;

The doctrine of hero worship, 17; What does he mean by the love of Gud? 19; Mr.

Carlyle not an original thinker, 20; " Unhappy men who do not love," 21.

CEDMON: His GENIUS AND INFLUENCE. By Brother Azarias,. .

22

Morley's " Early English Writers," 22 ; Bishop Aidann and the Abbess Hilda, 24 ;

Cedmon's life buried in obscurity, 25; First effusions of the great poet, 26; The
first to wed the Anglo-Saxon tongue to immortal verse, 29; He reaches the pinnacle

of fame, 30 ; Sublime and pure loftiness of his thoughts, 31 ; The secret of his success,

32; The holiness of his life added weight to his words, 33; Cedmon's spirit as em-

bodied in his poetry, 35; Examples from his great work, 35 et seq.; Not to be judged

by modern standards of criticism, 41: The poetry of Cedmon a revelation to the

people, 43 ; Popularity of Cedmon's poems, 44; Their effect upon the whole Teutonic

race, 45; Later developments of his writings, 46.

THE HUMAN SOUL AND BODY. By Rev. Walter Hill, S. J.,

The human soul and human knowledge, 48: How we obtain a knowledge of the

mind, 50; Evil results of the desire for novelty, 50 ; What theory best serves to ex-

plain man's nature, 52; The properties of matter and their scope, 54; How far

science and philosophy go in these matters, 55; Impossibility of extension in matter,

56; How to accouni for the different species of matter, 58; some new theories and

their difficulties, 58; The theory of extension and of sensible qualities in matter, 61 ;

The philosophy of Euler, Locke, and Descartes, 62; The theory of pre-established

barmony, 63; Illustration of and a common objection to these theories, 64; The

theory most consistent with reason, 65.

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