Page images
PDF
EPUB

the term Calvinism. These considerations justify, to the Author's own mind, the ground he has taken, as well as the title of his Book.

MODERN CALVINISM,

&c.

CHAP. I.

AVOWED SENTIMENTS OF THE BISHOP ON ORIGINAL

SIN, FREE WILL, AND THE OPERATIONS OF THE
HOLY SPIRIT, EXAMINED.

Sect. I.

The Bishop's arowed Sentiments on ORIGINAL SIN,

examined.

$1. What is a fair mode of enquiry on controverted subjects. $ 2. The

subject stated. $3. The sentiment that original righteousness is not entirely lost,

examined. $ 4. Original righteousness, what. 5. How understood by the Compilers of the Articles. $ 6. How entirely lost. $7. Even supposing it to mean good qualities and principles indefinitely. $ 8,9. What the intended alteration by the Assembly of

Divines. $ 10. The practical advantages of insisting on this doctrine, 11. That every good affection is not entirely lost, examined. $ 12. The

true state of the question. 13. What the Calvinists really hold on this point. § 14. His Lordship's observations on the

parable of the sower, considered. $15. That the power of obeying still remains, examined. The subject

stated. $ 16. The ambiguity of the term power. $ 17. The capability of a carnal mind, what. § 18. Observations on Cain and Abel. 19. Import of the phrase inclineth to evil ;" examined. $ 20. la what sense Calvinists admit that God gives power to every man.

One of the fairest methods of examining his work that an author can desire, is to state in his own words the sentiments he avows, and then to try them by that standard

B

§ 1.

[ocr errors]

which the nature of the subject legitimately requires. This is what the writer of the following strictures very sincerely desires to do, in the most respectful manner; and if, in any instance he should fail in the attempt, lie hopes it will not be imputed to an ungenerous design, or a cherished principle of disrespect. The hope of this construction he is the more disposed to entertain, as it is not his

purpose to defend every expression or unqualified sentiment maintained by that author whom his Lordship of Lincoln undertakes chiefly to refute, -and as he is not conscious of aiming to serve any party, at all hazards, but rather to promote the cause of truth in the spirit of Christian benevolence.

§ 2. On the different subjects debated, many things are advanced by his Lordship which are maintained alike by himself, and by those whom le professedly opposes.

It would be impertinent to enlarge on those things; and to dwell minutely on the smaller shades of difference, would lead to a needless prolixity. For every important purpose, I conceive, it will be sufficient to notice the most radical points in which the minor variations are virtually included. Those points on the subject of original sin, may be reduced to three heads, viz. That original righteousness is not entirely lost--that

« PreviousContinue »