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seem to have used the word in this sense elsewhere, and some have proposed to read “ weal.” In the Litany we have “in all time of our tribulation

;

in all time of our

IV. i. 446. In III. i. 30, III. i. 52, and IV. i. 408, the word seems to have the sense simply of

6 with.' Wroth (sub.). “I'll keep my oath,

patiently to bear my wroth ;” II. ix. 78. It is suggested that the word here means “ suffering.” In M.E. wroth was the past tense of writhe.

wealth."

Wit (sub.). “ If my father had not

scanted me and hedged me by his wit ;” II. i. 18. It has been proposed in this passage to read “ will.” But Shakespeare in this and in many passages uses " wit” in the

sense of wisdom. Withal (adv.), with the rest or with

it. “If you choose that, then I am yours withal;” II. vii. 12. So in III. ii. 210, III. iv. 72, and

Younker (sub.), a gay youth. “ How

like a younker or a prodigal the scarfed bark puts from her native bay ; " II. vi. 14. So in 3 Henry VI., II. i. 24, “ Trimm'd like a younker prancing to his love.”

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