The political state of the British Empire: containing a general view of the domestic and foreign possessions of the crown; the laws, commerce, revenues, offices, and other establishments, civil and military, Volume 2

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Printed for T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1818 - Great Britain

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Page 707 - LASTLY, extortion is an abuse of public justice, which consists in any officer's unlawfully taking, by colour of his office, from any man, any money or thing of value, that is not due to him, or more than is due, or before it is due ". The punishment is fine and imprisonment, and sometimes a forfeiture of the office.
Page 422 - ... sworn to determine, not according to his own private judgment, but according to the known laws and customs of the land; not delegated to pronounce a new law, but to maintain and expound the old one.
Page 280 - In these no man should take up arms, but with a view to defend his country and its laws; he puts not off the citizen when he enters the camp...
Page 471 - ... its jurisdiction extends to administer justice for all commercial injuries done in that very fair or market, and not in any preceding one. So that the injury must be done, complained of, heard, and determined, within the compass of one and the same day, unless the fair continues longer.
Page 562 - The distinction of public wrongs from private, of crimes and misdemeanors from civil injuries, seems principally to consist in this: that private wrongs, or civil injuries, are an infringement or privation of the civil rights which belong to individuals, considered merely as individuals...
Page 557 - And herein they state the naked facts, as they find them to be proved, and pray the advice of the court thereon; concluding conditionally, that if upon the whole matter the court should be of opinion that the plaintiff had cause of action, they then find for the plaintiff; if otherwise, then for the defendant.
Page 153 - Out of thine own mouth will I judge thee, thou wicked servant. Thou knewest that I was an austere man, taking up that I laid not down, and reaping that I did not sow: 23 Wherefore then gavest not thou my money into the bank, that at my coming I might have required mine own with usury?
Page 613 - But this does not extend to moonlight ; for then many midnight burglaries would go unpunished : and besides, the malignity of the offence does not so properly arise from its being done in the dark, as at the dead of night ; when all the creation, except beasts of prey, are at rest; when sleep has disarmed the owner, and rendered his castle defenceless.
Page 722 - And in those particular cases, the use was for the bishop or ordinary to demand his clerks to be remitted out of the king's courts, as soon as they were indicted...
Page 710 - ... upon the whole matter put in issue upon the indictment or information, and shall not be required or directed by the court or judge before whom it shall be tried to find the defendant guilty merely on the proof of the publication of the paper charged to be a libel and of the sense ascribed to the same in the indictment or information.

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