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EXAMINED JUDICIALLY
IN ORDER TO DEMONSTRATE THAT THEY WOULD HAVE

BEEN IMPOSSIBLE WITHOUT THE
SUPPRESSION OF THE FUNCTIONS

OF THE

PRIVY COUNCIL
BY THE 4TH OF ANNE, CAP. 8.

1827

BY DAVID URQUHART, Esq.
ENGLAND AND RUSSIA” (1835), “NAVAL POWER SUPPRESSED

BY THE MARITIME STATES" (1874), &c.

AUTITOR OF

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“It would be a war made by the English Ministry against the
French Republic."- M. Chauvelin to Lord Grenville, December, 1792.

LONDON: "DIPLOMATIC REVIEW" OFFICE, 22, EAST
TEMPLE CHAMBERS, WHITEFRIARS STREET, E.C.

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MONTREUX, Festival of the Annunciation, 1874. THE Chief of the Catholic Church has declared that the abuse of military power is one of the causes of existing evils, which is equivalent to saying that it is necessary to restrain this

power. The number of those who, in France, not only bear the name of Catholics, but profess obedience to the Holy See and reverence the person who occupies it, is very considerable. A small number amongst them would suffice to carry out the wishes of the Pope, if they accepted the duty and applied themselves to the task of comprehending how military power has become what it is at the present day: unlimited ; as also the origin and the consequences of such a state of things, and the remedies of which it is susceptible.

In a letter which I lately addressed to a French Review, I showed how the Crimean War originated, and what consequences have resulted from it; among which we must reckon the fall of the temporal Power of the Pope. It is very evident that if Catholics had foreseen this result, and, further, if they had known that that war was planned with this object, it could never have been made. It is not less evident that a war cannot be planned beforehand with an object totally different from its avowed and ostensible motive except in so far as the military power is in the hands of the executive, without being subjected to any sort of control, either in virtue of the law, or on the part of the nation, either by its knowledge of affairs or by its sentiment of justice.

In my present work I confine myself to wars which belong

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