Jarrolds' new code reading books. Infant classes [and] 1st-6th standard

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Page 67 - That, Father! will I gladly do: 'Tis scarcely afternoon — The minster-clock has just struck two, And yonder is the moon!
Page 92 - My brother John and I. And when the ground was white with snow, And I could run and slide, My brother John was forced to go, And he lies by her side." " How many are you, then," said I, " If they two are in heaven ?" Quick was the little Maid's reply,
Page 92 - Then did the little maid reply, "Seven boys and girls are we; Two of us in the churchyard lie, Beneath the churchyard tree." "You run about, my little maid, Your limbs they are alive; If two are in the churchyard laid, Then ye are only five." "Their graves are green, they may be seen," The little maid replied, "Twelve steps or more from my mother's door, And they are side by side.
Page 66 - Oft I had heard of Lucy Gray: And, when I crossed the wild, I chanced to see, at break of day, The solitary child. No mate, no comrade Lucy knew; She dwelt on a wide moor, The sweetest thing that ever grew Beside a human door! You yet may spy the fawn at play, The hare upon the green; But the sweet face of Lucy Gray Will never more be seen. "To-night will be a stormy night, — You to the town must go; And take a lantern, Child, to light Your mother through the snow.
Page 91 - That lightly draws its breath, And feels its life in every limb, What should it know of death ? I met a little cottage Girl: She was eight years old, she said ; Her hair was thick with many a curl That clustered round her head. She had a rustic, woodland air, And she was wildly clad ; Her eyes were fair, and very fair; •*—Her beauty made me glad. 22 " Sisters and brothers, little Maid, How many may you be?" " How many ? Seven in all," she said, And wondering looked at me.
Page 92 - So in the churchyard she was laid; and when the grass was dry, together round her grave we played, my brother John and I. And when the ground was white with snow, and I could run and slide, my brother John was forced to go, and he lies by her side.
Page 19 - WHATEVER brawls disturb the street, There should be peace at home ; Where sisters dwell and brothers meet, Quarrels should never come. Birds in their little nests agree : And 'tis a shameful sight, When children of one family Fall out, and chide, and fight.
Page 67 - The wretched parents all that night Went shouting far and wide; But there was neither sound nor sight To serve them for a guide. At day-break on a hill they stood That overlooked the moor; And thence they saw the bridge of wood, A furlong from their door. They wept — and, turning homeward, cried, "In heaven we all shall meet;" — When in the snow the mother spied The print of Lucy's feet.
Page 49 - Alas, alas! how very soon this silly little Fly, Hearing his wily, flattering words, came slowly flitting by: With buzzing wings she hung aloft, then near and nearer drew, — Thinking only of her brilliant eyes, and green and purple hue; Thinking only of her crested head — poor foolish thing!
Page 47 - WILL you walk into my parlour ? " said the Spider to the Fly, " Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy ; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I have many curious things to show when you are there." " Oh no, no," said the little Fly, " to ask me is in vain; For who goes up your winding stair can ne'er come down again.

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