The Presidential Veto

Front Cover
SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1988 - Political Science - 181 pages
This is the first modern study of the veto. In addition to tracing the genesis and historical evolution from Ancient Rome, through the ultimate inclusion in the Constitution, it also explores the veto's consequences for modern presidents. In doing so, Spitzer promotes a key argument about the relation between the veto power and the Presidency -- namely, that the rise of the veto power, beginning with the first Chief Executive, is symptomatic of the rise of the strong modern Presidency, and has in fact been a major tool of Presidency-building.

A special and revealing irony of the veto power is seen in the finding that, despite its monarchical roots and anti-majoritarian nature, the veto has become a key vehicle for presidents to appeal directly to, and on behalf of, the people. Thus, the veto's utility for presidents arises not only as a power to use against Congress, but also as a symbolic, plebiscitary tool.

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Contents

IV
1
V
3
VI
8
VII
10
VIII
22
IX
25
X
33
XI
39
XXVI
115
XXVII
116
XXVIII
117
XXIX
121
XXX
122
XXXI
123
XXXIII
126
XXXIV
129

XII
53
XIII
59
XIV
67
XV
71
XVI
75
XVII
78
XVIII
81
XIX
83
XX
94
XXI
100
XXII
105
XXIII
106
XXIV
107
XXV
108
XXXV
132
XXXVI
134
XXXVII
138
XXXIX
140
XL
141
XLI
143
XLII
145
XLIII
147
XLIV
153
XLV
159
XLVI
173
XLVII
175
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About the author (1988)

Robert J. Spitzer is Associate Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department at State University of New York College at Cortland. Author of The Presidency and Public Policy: The Four Arenas of Presidential Power and The Right to Life Movement and Third Party Politics, he is currently serving as a member of the New York State Commission on the Bicentennial of the Constitution.

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