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it may be remarked, that the whole amount of space so occupied in Part I. does not exceed thirty pages; the other pages, constituting more than three fourths of this Part, contain pieces which exemplify and il lustrate the rules under which they are placed, and, at the same time, afford some of the best specimens of reading-matter, both in respect to sentiment and style.

In selecting the reading lessons, both in Part I. and Part II., care has been taken that they should be new, or such as are not found in other school-books; that they should be adapted, not only to teach the art of reading, but to the capacities of the scholar; should be characterized by purity and variety of style; should be arranged in progressive order, and contain some useful instruction, suited to interest the young mind and improve the heart. It is believed that pieces, which contain some valuable thought or inculate some noble and virtuous sentiment, if written in an easy and attractive style, will be no less interesting to the young mind, and will be read a second and a third time with far more pleasure and profit, than those which consist of mere story or fiction, or sickly sentimentalism.

To aid the pupil in understanding what he reads, without which he can not read well, the more difficult words in each lesson in Part II. have been defined and placed at the head of the lesson, that they may be learned by the pupil before he comes to the reading exercise. Notes, also* are furnished at the bottom of the page, giving such information concerning persons or places named, or facts alluded to, as will aid the scholar in understanding the piece, or add to its interest. And, besides this, at the close of each reading lesson, questions are asked relative to the subject and prominent ideas in the lesson, and the elocutionary rules which it exemplifies. If these particulars are carefully attended to by teachers and pupils, they will do much, it is believed, not only to secure the reading of this book well, but to induce a habit of reading understandingly at all times, and thus facilitate general progress in knowledge.

This Revised And Enlabged Edition, containing sixty-two pages of new and peculiarly appropriate lessons, embraces Evert Variety or Rhetorical Exercises required in the school-room; but no changes have been made that will prevent the two editions being used in the same class, until the lessons of the old edition are exhausted.

In making this revision and enlargement, the authors have availed themselves of the valuable suggestions from many Practical TeachErs, both in New. England and New York, whose friendly services are hereby gratefully acknowledged.

THE AUTHORS.

Boston, November 26, 1866.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I. —ARTICULATION "l"

Definitions, Explanations, and Key to Pronunciation 11

Elementary Sounds And Substitutes 15

Table of Klementary Sounds 16

A Substitute Defined and Explained . . 19

Table of Vowel or Vocal Combinations . ... 20

Table of :. nb-vocal, Aspirate, and Vowel or Vocal Combinations . . 26

Table of Sub-vocal and Aspirate Combinations .11

Exercise On Sli.ent Letters 36

Diphthongs, Digraphs, And Triphthonos 39

Special Kules In Articulation 42

CHAPTER H. —ACCENT 46

Eule and Examples 47

CHAPTER ITI. — EMPHASIS 51

Absolute Emphasis 53

Rule for Important Words, &c, with Examples 53

Eule for the Bepetition of Emphatic Words, &c, with Examples . 56

Antithetic Emphasis 03

Rule for Words in Contrast, with Examples 62

CHAPTER IV. —INFLECTION . , 65

Definitions and Explanations 65

Eule for Direct Questions and their Answers, with Examples . . 66

Eule for the Disjunctive or, with Examples '70

Eule for Words and Clauses in Contrast 74

Rule for Pause of Suspension and Tender Emotion 78

Eule for Indirect Questions and Answers, with Examples .... 81

Eule for Language of Authority, Denunciation, &c 85

Eule for Emphatic Succession of particulars 89

Eule for Inflection whenever the Sense is Complete D3

Eule for Circumflex, with Examples 96

Rule for Monotone, with Examples 101

CHAPTER V. — MODULATION 104

Expression 105

Pitch, Divisions of, with Examples 105

Quantity, with Examples 106

Quality, with Examples 107

Movement, with Examples 108

Rule for Narrative, Descriptive Pieces, &c 109

Eule for Didactic and Argumentative Pieces 112

Rule for Language of Joy, Mirth, &c 114

Rule for Language, Grave, Grand, or Sublime 117

Eule for Language of Tender Emotion, &c 119

Rule for Language of Declamation .. 123

Personation 124

Eule for Reading Dialogues 125

Rhetorical Dialogue 12"

Grammatical and Rhetorical Pauses 129

Rule for Rhetorical Pause, with Examples 130

CHAPTER VI.— READING POETRY" 133

Rule 1, with Example 134

Rule 2, with Example . . . . 335

Rule 3, with Examples 136

Reading Exercises Illustrating The Rules.

1. The Advantages of Knowledge Youth's Comp. 17

2. Little Acts of Kindness American Miscellany. 24

3. The Se f-taught Boy Parley's Magazine. 29

4. A Fox Story American Miscellany. 34

5. What is Education'/ Miss Sedgwick. 36

6. The Falling Leaf Youth's Companion. 40

7. My First and Last Theft American Miscellany. 44

8. Don't Give Up Truth-Teller. 48

9. A Domestic Sketch '. Mrs. Sigourney. 54

10. Hannah Lamond Wilson. 58

11. Latent Energy W. B. Wells. 63

12. Self-Examination Miss Talbot. 68

13. Domestic Economy , Mrs. Farrar. 71

14. Christian Benevolence Chalmers. 75

15. Washington and his Mother American Miscellany. 79

16. Evidences of the Existence of God J. Maxcy. 82

17. The Ship Ariel among the Shoals Cooper. 86

18. The Objects in Reading Christian Examiner. 90

19. A Day at Sea N. P. Willis. 94

20. Men's Rights Todd. 97

21. A Scene on Lake George 4 . . . Club-Room. 101

22. Indian Summer in New England J. Story. 109

23. The Bosjpn Boy* in 1775 Ill

24. Sincerity Olive-Branch. 112

25. A Visit to the Country H. W. Beecher. 114

26. A Thunder-Storm in Mexico T. Flint. 117

27. An Incident in Webster's Life American Statesman. 119

28. Self-sacrificing Ambition . . • B. Greeley. 123

291 Borrowing. — Dialogue Original Adaptation. 125#

30?!lThe Strange Mechanic Arvine's Cyclopaedia. 127

31. How to Tell Fortunes B. Newton. 131

32. There's Work enough to do . . * True Path. 137

S3. Earthly Fame PoUok. 139

PART It.

Lessons In Reading.

1. Be Courteous 141

2. Alexander Murray • , Youth's Comp. 143

4. Maxims to Guide the Young 149

5. Truths from the Book of Nature J. P. Mc Cord. 150

7. The Bread-Fruit-Tree Parley's Magazine. 157

8. The Bundle of Sticks ""159

9. Farmer Burritt and his Library 160

11. The Shawl-Goat Parley's Magazine. 168

12. President Lincoln Dr. P. D. Ourley. 168

13. Amusing Anecdotes Arvine's Cyclopedia. 172

16. Richard Arkwright Youth's Comp. 177

17. Self-Reliance Banvard. 180

18. Grace Darling 183

21. Birds Rural Itanibles. 190

24. Select Paragraphs Various Authors. 208

25. Savin" too Much . . . L. C. Judson. 20.1

26. A Story of the Revolution 205

29. Female Kindness 214

30. Dignity of Labor 21«

81. Origin of the New England Thanksgiving J. S. Barry. 218

33. Gentility The Gem. 222

34. Rules for Behavior 226

37. Growth and Repair of the Body Evertnlay Wonders. 23S

38. The Sense of Beauty W. E. Churning. 242

39. The Love of Flowers B.W. Beecher. 243

42. The Silver Cup YonOCt Coma. 248

43. Intemperance • D. C Eddy. 251

44. Scenery of the White Mountains . . . . . . . . .. . . . 254

46. Profaneness 9. . . E H. Chapin. 260

47. Founding Harvard College J- S. Barry. 261

48. Dr. Franklin's Experiment in Electricity 263

49. Drawing G. B. Emerson. 268

50. Whittling & A. Gomlrich. 267

54. A Good Name ,../)*•. Hames. 283

55. English Luxuriousness 285

57. The Wise Men of Greece T. Bulfinch. 291

58. Copernicus E. Everett. 296

59. Sir Isaac Newton T. Buljinch. 298

60. Herschel and Fulton "" 800

61. Other Important Discoveries 302

64. The Gevsers .• Nordhaf. 307

65. The Young Lawyer John Todd. 309

66. The Young Lawyer. — Concluded. ""814

69. The Avalanche Peter Parky. 324

70. Fraternal Relations Thayer. 327

71. The Death of Bonaparte J. S. C. Abbott. 330

72. Influence of War on Domestic Life 332

76. Agriculture 31. P. Wilder. 344

79. Mount jEtna • Meyers's Universum. 351

80. The Eruptions of Mount jEtna ""354

81. An Extract from an Address II. W. Billiard. 358

83. The Rescue Party Dr- Kane. 362

84. The Rescue Party. — Concluded. "" 364

86. Victoria, Queen of England 370

87. Welcome to Kossuth . . . .' Charles Sumner. 373

90. An Autumn Scene Irring. 883

91. Selections in Prose 885

From Altamont, Young. — From Speech against employing

Indians, Chatham. — From Speech on Reform, Brougham.

92. Selections in Prose. — Continued 388

From Westminster Abhey, Irving.

93. Selections in Prose. — Continued. 890

From Speech against British Fugitives, Patrick Henry.

From Spartacus, Elijah Kellogg.

95. Selections in Prose. — Concluded • . • 395

From Speech on Freedom of Debate, Webster. From Speech

on Religious Toleration, Shiel. _ . „„„

96. Flowers . . ^ajnn. 899

97. Glories of the Night and Dawn Everett 400

100. Burial of Little Nell .en»' *£S

101. The Spirit of Patriotism /. W. Stuart 409

103. The Souroe and Boundary of Light 0 3f. Mitchel. 418

1SS. Virginius to the Roman Army Elijah Kellogg. 428

107. Patriotism of the Sons of Harvard .... Ex-Pret. Walker. 42»

109. The Cheerfulness of Piety Dr. Durbin- 4il
Poetry.

8. A Psalm of Life IsmcfeUoic. 147

6. The Beautiful True Path. 155

10. My Father's Growing Old Youth's Comp. 164

14. I-have and O-had-I 175

15. Village Bells Mitchell. 170

19. Mysterious Music of the Ocean C. Morris. 187

20. The River .' Rote-Bud. 189

23. The Song of Steam . . . . , G. W. Cutter. 197

27. New England's Dead Issac McLellan. 210

28. The True Aristocrat Stewart. 212

32. Thanksgiving Song 220

35. Sheridan's Hide . , • T. B. Read. 230

40. The Use of Flowers Sural Rambles. 246

41. To a Snowdrop "" 247

45. Morning among the Hills J. G. Percival. 258

51. Ode on Art C. Sprague. 271

52. Genius Slumbering J. G. Pernml. 272

56. The World at Auction Ralph lloyt. 288

62. The Mysteries of Nature . Rotalie Bell. 303

63. Haste Not, Rest Not Goethe. 305

67. Report of a Law-Case Cvtiper. 321

68. The Removal 323

73. Patriots and Martyrs 835

74. Fres. Lincoln's Favorite Poem .... Rev. Oliver Mr.. Cutcheon. 336

77. The Water E. Oakes Smith. 847

78. Marco Bozzaris Halleck. 349

82. The Young Lady's Toilet . 860

85. Twilight Halleck. 868

88. The Star-Spangled Banner F. S. Key. 375

91. Selections in Poetry. From Not on the Battle-Field, Pierponl.

From Absalom, Willis. — From Lord Ullin's Daughter, Camp-

bell. 385

92. Selections in Poetry. — Continued. From Apostrophe to the Ocean,

Byron. — From Pleasures of Hope, Campbell. — From The
Tempest, Shakspeare- — From Cato's Soliloquy, Addison. . 888

93.' Selections in Poetry. — Continued. From Catiline, Croly. . . . 890

94. Selections in Poetry. — Continued. From Dving Alchemist, Wil-

lis. — From The Progress of Madness, M. G. Lewis. — From

Macbeth, Shakspeare. — From The Rum Maniac, Allison.

From Macbeth, Shakspeare. — From The Alchemist, Willis. 393

95. Selections in Poetry. — Concluded. From William Tell, Knowles.

— From The Baron's Last Banquet, A. G. Greene. — From

The Seminole's Defiance, Patten. — From Marmion, Scott. . 396

98. Song of the Stars Bryant. 402

99. The Last Man Campbell. 404

104. The Old Clock on the Stairs Lonafellow. 420

106. Paul at Rome E.P. Weston. 426

108. Hohenlinden Campbell. 430

DlAL^feuES.

22. The Power of Steam Parley's Magazine. 193

864*1 '11 Give or Take Original Adaptation from Arthur. 233X

53*The Riftht of Way "" " " 2744^

75. The City Park "" " " 338

89. Scene from William Tell Sheridan Knowles. 377

H3. Selection from David and Goliah Hannah More. 391

102. A Court of Justice in Venice Shakspeare. 411

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