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In rhyme, the terminating -words or syllables in two or more lines correspond in sound. In blank-verse, the lines are measured as in rayme; but the last words or syllables do not harmonize.

Examples.

Rhyme.

Thus, hand in hand, through life we H go;
Its checkered j>aths of joy and woe,

With cautious steps, we H tread;
Quit its vain scenes without a tear,
Without a trouble or a fear,

And mingle with the dead.

Blank-Verse.
But yonder comes the powerful king of day,
Rejoicing in the east. The lessening cloud,
The kindling azure, and the.mountain's brow
Illumed with fluid gold, his near approach
Betoken glad.

SECTION I. .

The rules already given for reading prose are equally applicable jo poetry. The metrical structure of poetry, however, requires a few special rules, but only three of them are here introduced.

Rule 1. Poetry should be read with a fuller swell of the open vocals than prose, and in a more melodious and flowing manner.

Example.

Hail to the night when we gather once more

All the forms we love to meet;
When we've many a guest that's dear to our breast,

And the household dog at our feet.

Questions. — What is the distinction between rhyme and blank-verse? Give an example of each? Are the rules for reading prose equally applicable to poetry! Does poetry require any special rules? What is thojirst? Illustrate the rule by reading the example.

Who would not be in the circle of glee

When heart to heart is yearning;
When joy breathes out in the laughing shout

While the Christmas* log is burning?

SECTION II.

Rule 2. Poetry should be read in such a manner as best to convey the meaning of the author; and all sing-song should be carefully avoided.

The Italicized syllables and words in the examples under this section and the following, when made emphatic, mark the difference between their incorrect and their correct reading.

Example.
The Incorrect Reading.
Gather him to his grave again,

And solemnly and softly lay,
Beneath the verdure of the plain,

The warrior's scattered' bones away.
Pay the deep reverence, taught of old,

The homage of man's heart, to death;
Nor dare to trifle with the mold

Once hallowed by the Almighty's breath.

The Correct Reading.
Gather him to his grave again,

And solemnly and softly lay,
Beneath the verdure of the plain,

The warrior's scattered bones away.

Questions. What is said of Christmas? What is the second rule? What do the Italicized syllables and words in the example mark? Read the example. What fault is illustrated by the incorrect reading of the example? Read the example correctly.

* Christ'mas, a holiday or religious festival observed annually on the 25th of December, in memory of the birth of Christ, though we have no positive information respecting the precise day of his birth. The custom of making presents on Christmaseve is derived from very ancient usage, and contributes a great deal to make this time on interesting event to families.

Pay the deep reverence, taught of old,
The homage of inan's heart, to death;

Nor dare to trifle with the mold

Once hallowed by the Almighty's breath.

SECTION III.

Rule 3. In reading poetry, care should be taken not to emphasize particles and words that rhyme, unless the sense requires it

Examples. .

The Incorrect Reading.

The sheep are on the slopes around,
The cattle in the meadows feed;
And laborers turn the crumbling ground,
Or drop the yellow seed.

Judge not the Lord hy feeble sense,

But trust him for his grace;
Behind a frowning Provit/ence,
He hides a smiling face.

The Correct Reading.

The sheep are on the slopes around,

The cattle in the meadows feed;
And laborers turn the crumbling ground,
Or drop the yellow seed.

Judge not the Lord by feeble sense,

But trust him for his grace;
Behind a frowning Providence,
He hides a smiling face.

2.

1.

Questions. —What is the third special rule for poetry? What fault is illustrated by the incorrect reading of the examples? Read the examples correctly.

SECTION IV.

- J;neral Exercises On The Special Rules Fob Reading . Poetry.

[In reading the following exercises, the pupil should be careful to obserre the grammatical and the rhetorical pauses, the emphatic words, the proper inflections of the voice, and, at the same time, be particular to avoid such a sing-song utterance as would destroy the sense and all poetic beauty.]

EXERCISE I.

THERE'S WORK ENOUGH TO DO Tkui Path.

Rhyme.

1. The blackbird early leaves its rest

To meet the smiling mom,
And gather fragments for its nest,

From upland, wood, and lawn. *
The busy bee, that wings its way

'Mid sweets of varied hue,
At every flower would seem to say,

"There's work enough to do."

2. The cowslip and the spreading vine,

The daisy in the grass,
The snow-drop and the eglantine,

Preach sermons as we pass.
The ant, within its cavern deep,

'Would bid us labor too,
• And writes upon its tiny heap,

u There's work enough to do."

8. The planets, at their Maker's will,
Move onward in their cars;
For nature's wheel is never still,—
Progressive as the stars I

The leaves that flutter in the air,

And summer breezes woo,
One solemn truth to man declare, —

"There's work enough to do."

4. Who then can sleep, when all around

Is active, fresh, and free?
Shall man — creation's lord — be found

Less busy than the bee?
'Our courts and alleys are the field,

If men would search them through,
That best the sweets of labor yield,

And "work enough to do."

5. To have a heart for\ those who weep,

The sottish drunkard win;
To rescue all the children, deep

In ignorance and sin;
To help the poor, the hungry feed,

To give them coat and shoe;
To see that all can write and read, —

Is "work enough to do."

6. The time is short, — the world is wide,

And much has to be done;
This wondrous earth, and all its pride,

Will vanish with the sun!
The moments fly on lightning's wings,

And life's uncertain too;
We've none to waste on foolish things, —

"There's work enough to do."

Questions. —What is the pupil required to observe in reading the general exercises on the special rules for poetry? What does this exercise illustrate? What Usson does it inculcate?

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