International Law Chiefly as Interpreted and Applied by the United States, Volume 1

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Little, Brown,, 1922 - International law - 1757 pages
 

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Contents

TITLE A RIGHTS OF POLITICAL INDEPENDENCE 1 35 The Right to Become a State of International Law 55 2 Recognition a 36 In General 56 ...
59
ments
75
TERMINATION OF TREATIES 1 538 Preliminary 79 2 539 Notice Pursuant to Agreement 79 3 540 Later Agreement Superseding Earlier One 80...
91
AMICABLE MODES 1 NonJudicial Means a 552 Negotiation
99
Judicial Means
113
Intervention pages
116
g 7683 The Conduct of the United States 124130 h 84 The League of Nations and Intervention 132 7 The Monroe Doctrine
133
TITLE B GENERAL RIGHTS OF PROPERTY AND CONTROL
162
Succession
177
TITLE B NONAMICABLE MODES SHORT OF WAR 1 586 In General 166 2 587 Withdrawal of Diplomatic Relations 167 3 588 Retorsion Retali...
187
Certain Effects of Change of Sovereignty
199
THE COMMENCEMENT OF WAR 1 602 Processes of Initiation 195 2 603 Extent of Warning The Hague Convention of 1907 198 3 604 Civil W...
202
Control of Enemy Property within the National Domain
235
Nature and Limits of Rights pages a Extent of the National Domain 1 134 In General 241 2 Various Territorial Limits a 135 Artificial Lines
242
Neutral Persons and Property within Belligerent Territory a Persons 1 625627 Exaction of Military Service 244253
244
Sg 150 Straits
269
o 639 Flags of Truce
273
LAND WARFARE 1 Belligerent Forces a 648 Belligerent Qualifications Generally
290
ica 291292
291
Prisoners of War a 668672 Treatment 330340
330
The Sick and Wounded a 680 The Geneva Convention of 1864
350
b 681687 The Geneva Convention of 1906 352360 5 Belligerent Occupation a 688689 Nature and Effect 361365
361
RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF JURISDICTION
386
MARITIME WAR 1 Belligerent Forces a 703 Private Noncommissioned Vessels
389
797798 Preliminary 572575 2 799 Early Treaties of the United States 577 3 Controversies Respecting Certain Articles
580
Destination
602
342 In General 610 2 The Acquisition of American Nationality by Birth
615
Penalty
623
a 814 Nature of the Traffic
629
b 815 Penalty for Carriage 630 c 816 Treatment of the Cargo 634 6 Indirect Unneutral Service The Carriage of Enemy Persons and Despatches a 8...
635
824825 Preliminary 647650 2 Certain Conditions of Validity a 826 Authority to Institute Acts of Unrecognized Insur
657
The Temporary Protection of Domiciled Aliens Declaring an pages
686
The Duties of a Neutral State a 844847 The Nature of the Obligation 692697
692
AMERICAN PASSPORTS 1 399 In General 692 2 400 To Whom Issued 695 3 401 Grounds of Refusal 696 4 402403 International Effect 697698
697
TITLE A 407 In General 707 TITLE
708
BEGINNING AND END OF MISSION
725
THE RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF MINISTERS 1 426427 Right to Protection 739740
739
TITLE
776
The Requisite Measure of Exertion 1 882 The Rules of the Treaty of Washington Due Diligence 778 2 883 The Hague Convention of 1907
780
CONSULS
785
g 884885 The Question of Belligerency 781784 h 886 Effect of Armistice 785 2 Inviolability of Neutral Territory a 887 The Duty of the Belligere...
792
TITLE D
794
AMERICAN PRIZE COURTS AND PROCEDURE 1 890 Courts 796 2 Jurisdiction a 891 To Adjudicate
798
sion between the United States and Great Britain during the World War 804810 c 896 Need of an International Tribunal 811 4 Some Aspects of Ame...
812
Modes of Termination
820
a 909 The Public Exchange of Views of Responsible States
827
Copyright

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Page 182 - that the adjustment of colonial claims should be based upon a strict observance of the principle " that in determining all such questions of sovereignty the interests of the populations concerned must have equal weight with the equitable claims of the government whose title is to be determined.
Page 39 - liquor traffic and the prevention of the establishment of fortifications or military and naval bases and of military training of the natives for other than police purposes and the defense of territory, and will also secure equal opportunities for the trade and commerce of other Members of the League.
Page 39 - had reached a state of development "where their existence as independent nations can be provisionally recognized subject to the rendering of administrative advice and assistance by a Mandatory until such time as they are able to stand alone." The wishes of such communities
Page 29 - granted to the United States in perpetuity the use, occupation and control of a specified zone of land and land under water for the construction, maintenance, operation, sanitation and protection of an inter-oceanic ship canal, and of ten miles in width (together with certain lands and islands outside of the zone),
Page 146 - made and accepted, it would, in his opinion, be the duty of the United States to resist by every means in its power as a willful aggression upon its rights and interests, the appropriation by Great Britain of any lands, or the exercise of governmental jurisdiction over any territory which after investigation
Page 53 - There shall be placed under the direction of the League all international bureaux already established by general treaties if the parties to such treaties consent. All such international bureaux and all commissions for the regulation of matters of international interest hereafter constituted shall be placed under the direction of the League.
Page 532 - the responsibility of herself and her allies for causing all the loss and damage to which the Allied and Associated Governments and their nationals had been subjected as a consequence of the war imposed upon them by the aggression of Germany and her allies. 1
Page 39 - other territories, such as Southwest Africa and certain of the South Pacific Islands, which, owing to the sparseness of their population, or their small size, or their remoteness from the centers of civilization, or their geographical contiguity to the territory of the Mandatory, and other circumstances,
Page 124 - therefore, it must be unwise in us to implicate ourselves by artificial ties in the ordinary vicissitudes of her politics, or the ordinary combinations and collisions of her friendships or enmities. Our detached and distant situation invites and enables us to pursue a different
Page 358 - shall receive, in the States and Territories of the other, the most constant protection and security for their persons and property, and shall enjoy in this respect the same rights and privileges as are or shall be granted to the natives, on their submitting themselves to the conditions imposed upon the natives.

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