The Works of Alexander Pope, Esq: With Notes and Illustrations by Himself and Others. To which are Added, a New Life of the Author, an Estimate of His Poetical Character and Writings, and Occasional Remarks,, Volume 10

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C. and J. Rivington; T. Cadell; Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green; J. Cuthell; J. Nunn; ... [and 25 others in London]; and Deighton and Sons, Cambridge; and A. Black, and J. Fairbairn, Edinburgh., 1824 - English literature
 

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Page 11 - Westward the course of empire takes its way; The four first acts already past, A fifth shall close the drama with the day : Time's noblest offspring is the last.
Page 506 - ... you have made my system as clear as I ought to have done, and could not. It is indeed the same system as mine, but illustrated with a ray of your own, as they say our natural body is the same still when it is glorified. I am sure I like it better than I did before, and so will every man else. I know I meant just what you explain ; but I did not explain my own meaning so well as you. You understand me as well as I do myself; .but you express me better than I could express myself.
Page 252 - Fenton, before y" came ; but stay'd to have inform'd myself & you of ye circumstances of it. All I hear is, that he felt a Gradual Decay, tho' so early in Life, & was declining for 5 or 6 months. It was not, as I apprehended, the Gout in his Stomach, but I believe rather a Complication first of Gross...
Page 417 - My family give you their love and service. The great loss I sustained in one of them gave me my first shock, and the trouble I have with the rest to bring them to a right temper to bear the loss of a father who loves them, and whom they love, is really a most sensible affliction to me. I am afraid, my dear friend, we shall never see one another more in this world.
Page 122 - I like the scheme of our meeting after distresses and dispersions ; but the chief end I propose to myself in all my labors is to vex the world rather than divert it ; and if I could compass that design without hurting my own person or fortune, I would be the most indefatigable writer you have ever seen, without reading.
Page 276 - God knows, she is extremely weak : the slow fever works under, and mines the constitution ; we keep it off sometimes, but still it returns, and makes new breaches before nature can repair the old ones. I am not ashamed to say to you, that I admire her more every hour of my life : death is not to her the King of Terrors ; she beholds him without the least. When she suffers much, she wishes for him as a deliverer from pain ; when life is tolerable, she looks on him with dislike, because he is to separate...
Page 187 - Mr. Gay's opera has been acted here twenty times, and my Lord Lieutenant tells me it is very well performed; he has seen it often, and approves it much.
Page 8 - Jervas, who has grievously offended, in making the likeness of almost all things in Heaven above and earth below; and one Mr. Gay, an unhappy youth, who writes pastorals during the time of divine service ; whose case is the more deplorable, as he hath miserably lavished away all that silver he should have reserved for his soul's health, in buttons and loops for his...
Page 306 - God has made our greatest interest and our plainest duty indivisibly the same — these three epistles, I say, are finished. The fourth he is now intent upon. It is a noble subject. He pleads the cause of God (I use Seneca's expression) against that famous charge which atheists in all ages have brought — the supposed unequal dispensations of Providence — a charge which I cannot heartily forgive your divines for admitting. You admit it indeed for an extreme good purpose, and you build on this...
Page 10 - The Muse, disgusted at an age and clime Barren of every glorious theme, In distant lands now waits a better time, Producing subjects worthy fame: In happy climes, where, from the genial sun And virgin earth, such scenes ensue. The force of Art by Nature seems outdone, And fancied beauties by the true: In happy climes, the seat of innocence, Where Nature guides, and Virtue rules, Where men shall not impose, for truth and sense, The...

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