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4. 9. 108.

or

Shot-free, adj. Scot-free. A.D. *Snotterie, n.

[f. snot, nasal 25. Cf. note.

mucus.) Filthiness. 5. 3. 293, 501 *Silkenesse, n. Silkiness: used (cf. note), 507. humorously, simulating such titles Snuffer, n. Prob. here, a dish as 'your highness,' to imply lux- for holding snuff. 2. I. 61. Cf. uriousness, etc. CD. 3. I. 261. note. Silly, adj. Foolish, but with the

Sock, n. (a) A light shoe or added arch. sense of weak, impotent. slipper worn by actors in the ancient

comedy; (b) nether stocks. 3. 4. Sinnewe, n. A nerve. (It is 325. in some cases difficult to determine Sodaine, adv. An obs. variant of whether Jonson has in mind the Sudden. 4. 5. 191, et passim. older meaning 'nerve, or the pres Soothe, v. †To indulge and enent meaning 'tendon.') 1. 3. 75, et courage. 4. 5. 224; 4. 6. 55. passim.

Sort, n. ŤA set, company, pack. Sirra(h, n. A word of address, 1. 2. 219, et passim. almost equivalent to 'fellow' Sounding, n. A flourish of trum'sir,' used in anger or contempt. pets in the old theatre. Ist S.D. Obs. or arch. 1. 2. 32, et passim. Cf. note. +Skelder, v. 1) intr.

To prac

Soueraigntie, n. † Control, mastise begging, esp. under the pretense tery. 2. 2. 16. Cf. note. of being a wounded or disbanded Sower, adj. (Sour.) Satirical; soldier; play the swindler. CD. bitter. 3. 5. I. 1. 2. 52. Skeldring, 5. 3. 189.

Sparke, n. A gay and sprightly 2) tr. To swindle, etc. 3. 4. 167. young man.

1. 2. 215. Skil, v. To make a difference; Spermacete, n. A fatty subhave significance. Obs. or arch. stance found in the head of the

sperm whale, used in ointments and Skill, n. Discernment; knowl-cosmetics. Here, a term of endearedge. 4. 6. 36.

ment. 2. I. 72. Skinker, n. A server of drink; Spight, n. An obs. form of Spite. a tapster. Obs. or dial. 4. 5. 139. E. 60, et passim.

+'Slid, interj. God's (eye) lid. Spight, v. To hate. Rare. 5. 3. 3. I. 3.

S'light, interj. God's light. 3. Spright, n. Obs. form of Sprite. 1. 83; 4. 3. 16 ('Slight).

Spirit; wit. 3. I. 12. Sling, n. †A piece of artillery in †'Sprecious, interj. God's preuse in the sixteenth century. CD. cious (blood, life, etc.) 2. I. 134. 4. 1. 26. Cf. note.

*Spurious, adj. 5. 3. 293, 501 (cf. Smart-tongu'd, adj. Having a note), 507. sharp tongue; given to the use of Square, adj. Proper; specious. biting speech. Arch. 4. 5. 107. 4. 6. 73. *Snarlimg gusts, n. phr. 5.3. 546.

Staffe, n. A stanza. 2. 2. 170. Cf. note.

Stager, n. A player. 3. 4. 196,

3. 4. 188.

478.

3. 1. 8.

et passim. (In 1. 2. 17, possibly a *Sunke, adj. Sunken. E. 4. gallant who haunts the theatre.) Sute, v. (a) †To dress, clothe;

Stalker, n. A player—so called fit out with apparel; (b) to bebecause of his imposing stride. come; befit. 1. 2. 149. 3. 4. 132, 293.

Supersedeas, n. In law, a writ Stalking, adj. †Fit for the mouth having in general the effect of a of a 'stalker' or player; tragic; command to stay, on good cause bombastic. 3. 4. 174.

shown, some ordinary proceedings Stall, n. ŤA depository. 3. 1. 114. which ought otherwise to have pro

Stand, n. A robbery. (Prob. ceeded. CD. 1. 3. 19. from the highwayman's command, Surcease, v. To cease; make Stand! or, Halt!) Cf. mod. slang. an end. Obs. or arch. 3. 5. 7. 'a hold-up.' Obs.? A.D. 49.

Swagg(e)rer, n. A blusterer, Starch, v. Phr., Starch you: to bully, bravo. (Used in compliment starch clothes for you. 4. I. 19.

by Tucca, as the term 'sport among Stiffe-toe, 1. tA nickname for certain classes to-day.) I. 2. 88, an actor. 3. 4. 187, 321.

et passim. Stile, n. A stilus, pen. 3. 5. 65 Swell, v. tr. *To fill. I. I. 81; (cf. note); A.D. 84.

Still, adv. I) Continually; al #Swown, v. ME. form of Swoon, ways. Arch. 2. I. II; 3. I. 246, to faint.

2. 2. 192. et passim.

Sycophant-like, adj. Parasitical; 2) Yet. 1. 3. 64, et passim. servile. 5. 3. 112.

#Stinkard, n. One who stinks; a low fellow. 1. 2. 34, et passim.

T. Straight, adj. † Strait, in the

Tabacco, n. Tobacco. (Cf. Fr. sense of tight. 3. 4. 262.

tabac, It. tabaco, Sp. tabaco, etc.) Straight-bodied, adj. bodied: close-fitting. 4. I. 4.

Table, n. †A tablet or slab, esp. *Strenuous, adj. 5. 3. 302, 520 one designed to bear an inscription. (cf. note), 522.

3. 5. 55. Strooke, pp. Obs. pp. of Strike. Taile, n. Phr., In taile of: im1. 3. 71; A.D. 37.

mediately after. 5. 2. 56. Cf. note. Stumpe, n. A nickname for the Tall, adj. Bold, sturdy. 3. 2. 24. elder Ovid, possibly in allusion to Tankerd-bearer, n. One who, his walking stiffly, as an old man. when London was very imperfectly Obs. or dial. ? I. 2. 169.

supplied with water, fetched water Stut, v. To stutter. Arch. oi in tankards, holding two or three prov. 4. 5. 79.

gallons, from the conduits and Sufficiencie, n. A kind of knowl- pumps in the street. Such persons edge or discipline that gives ability were compelled to wait their turn or efficiency. Arch.

1. 2. 132.

to draw water. CD. 4. 3. 117. Sugred, adj. Sweet; alluring. Taphouse, n. A drinking-house; Arch. or poet. 4. 2. 55.

tavern. Rare. I. 2. 90.

Strait- A.D. 159.

n.

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Tartarous, adj. Like a Tartar;

Tir'd, pp.

Pounced (upon); barbarous, cruel. Obs. or arch. made a prey. 4. 3. 15. 5. I. 103

Tire, n. A head-dress. (Cf. Taste, v. †To prove; test, try. tiara.) Arch. 3. I. 50. 3. 1. 172 (fig., cf. note); 5. 3. 561.

'Tis, v.

It is, i. e., he is. Obs. Tauerne-like, adj. Vulgar; char- or arch. 3. 4. 400; 5. 3. 161. acterized by a want of taste. 2. 1. 117. Torture, n. (A printer's blun

Teare, v. To rave, bluster. Now der?) A torturer. 3. I. 275. colloq. 3. 4. 156.

Tother, adj. [A form arising +Teare-mouth, A ranter; from the mis-division of that other, one who tears a passion to tatters. ME. also thet other, as the tother. 3. 4. 135.

CD.) Other. Arch. 2. 1. 66. Tearme, n. An obs. form of Touch, v. †To put to the proof. Term. Here, prob., = epithet. 5. 3. 90. A.D. 21.

Toward, adj. † Coming; at hand. Tell, v. To count. Arch., exc. 4. 5. 177. in phrases such as 'to tell beads.'

Traine, n. A wile, plot. 4. 7. 47. 1. 2. 224.

Transcend, +To

ascend, Tempest, v. To fall like a mount. 5. 2. 32. tempest; to storm. Rare. 5. I. 52. Transpos'd, pp. †Transferred?

Terse, adj. (a. Lat. tersus, pp. or, subjected? 4. 9. 57. of tergere, to wipe, polish.) *Smooth Trick, n. †A trifling ornament. and neat? 3. I. 34.

3. I. 54. Thankes, n. pl. The use of the Trickt, pp. Drawn, as armorial plural form for the singular is obs. bearings; portrayed. I. 2. 57. 4. 7. 40.

Troth, n. Truth, faith. In troth, Thornie-tooth'd, adj. Railing; 1. 3. 8; good troth, A.D. 41. sharp-tongued; satiric. Nonce Troth, interj. In faith. Withword. 4. 3. 112.

out preposition the use of troth is *Thorough, prep. Through. I. colloq. or lit., not vernacular.

I. 3. 2. 124.

14; 3. I. 19, 99, 235. Threate, v. To menace (with). Troupe, n. A playhouse audiObs. or arch. 3. 5. 79.

Obs.? E. 57. Thunder, v. 1) intr. To speak Trow, v. To believe; think. with a loud or rumbling voice. Added to a question to express sur3. 4. 252.

prise or impatience, as here, and 2) tr. To threaten or prophesy then equivalent to I wonder.' in loud and awful tones. 3. 5. 83. Obs. or arch. 2. 2. IOI.

3) tr. †To assail with thunder Tumbler, n. ta kind of greyor thunderbolts. 4. 5. 129.

hound formerly used in hunting Timely, adv. Early, soon. Obs. hares; here, a nickname. 1. 2. 197. or arch. 1. 2. 81.

Cf. note. || Timoria, n. [Gr. tiuwpla retri †Tumorous, adj. (a. Lat. tumor, bution, vengeance.) Retribution, a swelling.) Swelling. 5. 3. 405. vengeance. 3. 4. 247, 249.

**Turgidous, adj. [a. Lat. tur

or rare,

ence.

gidus, swollen.) Turgid; bom Vpreare, v. Fig., To raise, exalt. bastic. 5. 3. 513 (cf. note), 515.

Arch. 3. 4. 233. Turne, n. Bent; inclination; dis Vrne, n. The Roman urna, a position. 3. I. 38.

vessel into which were cast voting*Tuscane-top, n. A style of tablets or lots of any kind. 3. 5. 79. head-dress. 3. I. 55.

V Twang, v. † To surmise, guess?

Vaile, v. 1) †To uncover (the 1. 2. 49; 5. 3. 350. "Twixt, prep.

Abbrev. of Be- head); bow. 3. 4. 131. twixt = between. Arch. P. 22.

2) (A form of Veil.) To conTwo-penny, adj. Cheap; vul- ceal. I. 3. 37 gar; brazen; but with special refer Vantage, n. Advantage. Arch. ence to the two-penny gallery' at or colloq. 2. 2. 168. the Elizabethan theatre, which be

Varlet, n. I) A scoundrel, rascame the haunt of 'prentices, mem

cal. Obs. or arch. 5. 3. 40, 263, 418. bers of the demi-monde, and the like. With especial application to the 3. 4. 135, 220.

sergeants of the Counter: 3. 4. 21, Tyranne, n. An obs. form of 36. Tyrant. 5. 3. 65.

2) †A body-servant or attendant.

(Cf. valet.) 5. 3. 652. U

||Veni, v. Latin: I have come. Undertaker, n. fOne who be- 3. 4. 250, 251.

**Ventositous, adj. Windy, comes surety or guarantor for an

flatulent; boastful. 5. 3. 513 (cf. other. Ded. Vnder-thought, n. An underly

note), 516.

Vermine, n. A low, vile fellow. ing self-consciousness or

sense of

Here, a nickname. 3. 4. 77. inadequacy, that results in con

|| Vindicta, n. Latin: vengeance, straint of manner. Nonce word?

punishment. 3. 4. 246, 248. 4. I. 34.

Vizard, n. An obs. form of Vnrip, v. To rip; cut open.

Vizor, a mask. 5. 3. 396, 449.
Arch.? 3. 4. 110.
Vnseason'd, adj.

Vulgar, adj. General; common (a) †Unsea

to the multitude. Arch.? 5. I. 118. sonable; (b) unripe. 5. 3. 19. *Vntrusser, n. One who

Vulgarly, adv. †Publicly. 3. 3. trusses; hence, one who unmasks

W and scourges folly. CD. 5. 3. 628 ; A.D. 141.

Wag, n. A fellow in affectionate Vntrussing, v. n. Exposing, as sense, without attribution of humor if by letting down the breeches by or pleasantry. CD. Arch. and untying the points that hold them colloq. 4. 3. 79. up. 4. 7. 31; 5. 3. 312.

Wedlocke, n. A wife. 4. 3. 29. Vnwittingly, adv. Unconsciously; Cf. note. without being known, or noticed. Weele, v. A contraction of We Obs.? I. 3. 9.

shall, we will. 2. 2. 118.

un

22.

5. 3. 162.

Wel-digested, pp. adj. In Worthlesse, adj. Unworthy, unstructed, learned, wise. Used of deserving. Arch. 5. 2. 8. one who has assimilated his learn +Wote, v. [OE. witan, ME. ing. 5. 3. 372.

witen.) Incorrect form for Wost Welkin, n. The heavens. Now (later wottest), you know, formed poet. I. I. 19.

by analogy with the forms I wot, Wench, n. A damsel; young he wot. Arch. 4. 4. 37. woman in general-a familiar term, Wright, v. An obs. spelling of but not derogatory as now. Arch. Write. 3. 1. II; 5. 2. 81. or lit. 4. 3. 62.

Wrist, n. The hand. Phr., Giue Whale-bone-bodies,

See mee thy wrist : shake hands. Obs.? Bodies. 2. I. 70. † Where, n. A place. Phr., Each

Writ, n. †A writing (here, a where: in each place, every where. copy of some verses). The term 5. 2. 58.

appears to be obs. except in legal Whether, adv. An obs. form of

senses. 5. 3. 274. Whither. 3. I. 126.

Writ, v. An arch. preterit of Whether, pron. Which. Arch. Write. A.D. 61. 3. 5. 57

+Wu', v. Abbrev. of ME. wulle, Which, pron. Used as the rela-wule, pres. first sing. of Will. 3. 4. tive Who. Obs. or arch. I. 3. 45.

220. Who(o)rson, adj. Bastard-like; low, mean. (Often used in coarse

Y familiarity.) 1. 2.91; 5. 3. 418.

Yee, pron. Here, a

term of Will, v. 1) tr. řTo do; accom- familiarity or contempt. Arch. and plish. 3. 5. 91.

poet. 3. 4. 167, 223. 2) Absol. 3. 5. 91; 5. 3. 29.

Yfaith, interj. In faith. Arch. Winne, v. Phr., Winne vpon: 2. 1. 47, 128; 2. 2. 28; 3. 2. 16. To gain favor or influence. Obs.

Yon, adj. Yonder.

Arch. exc. or prov. A.D. 87.

poet. 3. 4. 191. tWiser, adv. More wisely. 4. 5.

+Yond', adj. Yonder. 4. 3. 15. Withall, adv. Besides, likewise.

Z 3. 4. 231. Wittie, adj.

A comic performer, #Well-informed;

Zany, n. “knowing. 5. 3. 151.

originating on the Italian stage,

whose function it is to make awkWizard, n. A wise man. 4. 5. 50.

ward attempts at mimicking the Woe, v.

An obs. variant of Woo. tricks of the professional clown, or 3. 5. 74.

the acts of other performers; hence, Wo(o)luish, adj. An obs. form an apish buffoon in general. CD. of Wolfish. 4. 7. 47; 5. 3. 651. 3. 4. 315. Worme, n.

A serpent. Obs. or Zenith, n. The point of the arch. E. 6.

heavens directly above the observer; *Wormewood, adj. Bitter. 1. here, prob., the heavens in general. 2. 54.

1. 3. 46.

20.

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