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GLOSSARY

This Glossary is designed to include all words found in Poetaster which are obsolete, archaic, dialectal, or rare; current words used in obsolete, archaic, or exceptional senses; and, so far as practicable, archaic or peculiar phrases. Current words in current senses have been occasionally included, in order to facilitate the interpretation of obscure or otherwise difficult passages. A single reference to act, scene, and line has usually been deemed sufficient, except in the case of words rare or of doubtful meaning, where every occurrence has been recorded. When a word now in good use has been employed by Jonson in an obsolete or rare sense, and again in a modern sense, the Glossary usually cites only the unfamiliar usage. Etymologies have in general been given only for one of two objects: 1) to call attention to Jonson's habit of using words of Latin origin in their original sense; 2) to show ground for peculiar interpretation. Verbs have been distinguished as transitive or intransitive only in special cases.

A dagger preceding a word indicates that the word is obsolete; preceding a definition, that the word is obsolete in the particular sense required. Parallel lines before a word show that it has never become naturalized in English. Other signs and abbreviations are those common in the dictionaries.

The words disgorged by Crispinus-Marston in Act 5, being fully discussed in the notes, are here indicated by asterisks.

E. 31.

A

Accommodate, v. †To fit, or †A', pron. He. 3. 2. 19; 3. 4. 102. make acceptable, to. (An obs. and FA', prep. Of. I. I. 14.

rare constr. is to accommodate a Abated, pp. [a. OF. abatre, thing to a person. NED.) 3.4. 303. abattre to overthrow, f. a to, battre

Accost, v. To approach, draw to beat.] Subdued; put an end to. near to. Arch. 2. 2. 91. Cf. note.

Action, n. 1) A hostile engageAbiect, n. ŤA base, degraded, or ment; fight. 3. 4. 109.

2) †Acting of plays. 3. 4. 211. worthless thing. I. 3. 59.

3) (a) General conduct; (b) Absolue, v. [ad. Lat. absolvere

acting. 1. 2. 62. to loosen, free.] †To clear off or

†Admirable, adv. Wonderfully; discharge liabilities. 3. 4. 70.

remarkably. 3. 4. 260. Abstracted, pp. adj. ŤAbstruse; Admir'd, pp. adj. Wondered at. difficult. A.D. 194.

Arch. 5. I. 138. Acceptiue, adj. Willing to re Admittance, n. †Admission, in ceive or accept. 3. 4. 95.

the sense of concession. 4. 8. 29.

n.

5. 3. 627.

22.

Aduance, v. To raise, exalt in tApt, v. [ad. Lat. aptus, fitted, f. rank or reputation. Arch. 5. I. 53; apere, to fasten, attach.) 5. 3. 317.

I) To prompt; direct. 1. 2. 107. †Affect, n. Affection. 4. 9. 19. 2) To incline; dispose (to).

Affect, v. I) To like; show A.D. 204. preference for. Arch. 3. I. 55; 5. Arch, n. ŤA style of head-dress. 3. 341.

3. I. 56. 2) †To effect; obtain. R. 11. Argue, v. tr. řTo accuse. P. 17. 3) a) †Aspire to; (b) assume. Arme-hole, The arm-pit.

Obs. or arch. 3. 4. 388. Affected, pp. Disposed, inclined. Armorie, n. Armor collectively; 3. I. 124.

weapons. Arch. 4. 4. 46. Affright, v. To frighten. Arch.

† Arse, n. The buttocks.

4. 7. 3. 5. 85. Aforehand, adv. Previously

tAs, pron. Which. A.D. 217. Arch. and dial. I. 2. 23.

As, conj. As if; as though. After, adv. Afterward. 1. 3. 6.

Arch. 3. 5. 42; 5. I. 64. After, prep. Like; in the man

As, conj. adv. † That. A.D. 13, ner of. 5. I. 79.

130. Agnomination, (Lat. ag

Aspire, v. 1) intr. To rise like nomen, a second cognomen.] Al

an exhalation; to mount heavenlusion through one word to another.

ward. 1. I. 2; 1. I. 88. (Cf. agnominate, to nickname.) 3.

2) tr. †To mount up to; reach, Aire, 1. ŤA sprightly song? 2.

attain. 3. 5. 30. 2. 207.

Assai’d, pp. Ventured, dared All and some, n. phr. Each (with inf.). 3. 5. 76. member of the whole. Arch. Attend, v. I) †To await; look 5. 3. 301.

for (a person). 1. 2. 159, et passim. ||Altitonans, adj. [Lat., thunder 2) To listen to. Arch. 2. 2. 188. ing from on high.) An epithet of Autenticall, adj. (Obs. form of Jupiter. 4. 5. 217.

Authentical.) Trustworthy; de†Ambrosiack, adj. Ambrosial.

serving of respect. Arch. 4. 9. 29. 4. 5. 203.

Auoid, v. †To send away; ex†An, conj. (A shortened form

pel. 5. 3. 20. of And=if.) If. 3. 4. 52.

Award, v. †To sentence (to do, ŤAnd, conj. If. I. I. 35, et passim.

or to suffer, something). 5. 3. 593. Anon, adv. Immediately. I. 3.

Away, adv. Phr., Away with: 60, et passim.

to tolerate, endure. Arch. 3. 4. Approue, v. 1) †To prove. 5.

296. 1. 116.

Ay, interj. Phr., Ay me! Alas! 2) Phr., Approue in: to concur Ah me! Arch. 4. 9. 48; 95. (Cf. in, approve of. 2. 2. 9.

Glossary, s. v. I, and Notes, E. 3.)

1. 97.

ued gum.

2. I. 60.

2. I.

B

Bastoun, n. Baston or baton, a Back-face, n.

A face looking cudgel or club. 5. 3. 624. Cf. note. backward: e. g., of Janus, the face

Bawd, n. In general sense, a gothought of as turned backward or between, pander. 4. 3. 117. away. Nonce word?

I. 2. 147.

Be, v. pl. Are. Obs. exc. dial. Back-side, n.

†The rear of a 4. 2. I; 5. 3. 400. dwelling. 2. I. 13.

Because, conj. †In order that; Baffull, v. (A form of baffle.) so that. 4. 7. 29, 33.

Behauiours, 1. pl. Deportment. fTo disgrace; confound. A.D. 146. Balke, v. To disappoint. 1. 2.

2. I. 167.

Beholding, adj. Under obliga228.

tion, indebted.

1. 2. 162. Balsamum, n. 1) Balsam, a val

Belike, adv. Probably; possibly.

Arch, or dial. I. 2. 187. 2) A term of endearment.

†Bescumber, v.

To void excre72. Band, n. A neckband, or collar. ment upon. 5. 3. 314.

+Bespawle, v. To bespatter with 5. 3. 197. Cf. note.

saliva. 5. 3. 297. Ban-dog, . A dog needing to

+Best-best, adj. Superlatively be chained up; a watch-dog. Often

excellent. 5. 3. 473. applied, as here, to the sergeants of the Counter, or

†Better cheape, adv. phr. At a debtors' prison.

lower price. This expression is 3. 4. 4. Cf. note.

built upon the obs. Cheap, Bane, n. Fatal mischief; woe.

meaning originally 'bargaining, Now poet. 5. 2. 68.

barter, etc. Good cheap therefore || Barathrum, n. (Lat., adapted from Gr. Bápaopov.] A pit or gulf. low price.' I. 2. 209.

means 'on advantageous terms, at a 3. 4. 298. Cf. note.

Betwixt, prep. Between. Arch. Barmy, adj. Full of barm, or and poet. 2. I. 59. froth. (Phr., Barmy-froth.) 5. 3. Bin, pp. tObs. form of been. 5. 294, 511, 515. Cf. note. Base, n. A plaited skirt, of cloth,

Blaunch't, pp. adj. Obs. form of velvet, or rich brocade, appended to Blanched. 4. 8. 17. the doublet, and reaching from the Blaz'd, DR. +Described, porwaist to the knee, common in the trayed—as if heraldically blazoned. Tudor period. NED. 3. I. 74.

5. 3. 363. Base, adj. 1) Low in the social Blazond, pp. Blazoned; clearly scale; plebeian. Arch. 3. 4. 110? painted or described. I. 2. 57 4. 5. 20; 4. 7. 42 (this in both

Block, n. Orig. a form or mould senses).

for shaping a hat; here = kind, 2) Low in the moral scale. Pas- style. Arch. 4. 5. 158. Cf. note. sim.

Bodies, n. pl. (The 16th and Bastinado, v. To beat, as with 17th cent. spelling of Bodice.) Fora stick. Arch. 5. 3. 400.

merly. An inner garment for the

n.

3. 376.

90.

I. 2.

upper part of the body, quilted and addressed, as in Shaks., 'bully Botstrengthened with whalebone (worn tom,' 'bully doctor.' Obs. exc. arch. chiefly by women, but also by men); NED. 5. 3. 160. a corset, stays; freq. called a pair +Bumrowle, n. Bumroll, a sort of bodies (bodice) 'a pair of stays.' of bustle. 2. 1. 70. Cf. note. NED., s. v. Bodice. 2. I. 70.

Burst, pp. adj. † Shattered; Bodkin, n. A long hairpin. 3. broken. 3. 5. 23. 1. 52, 58.

Buskin, n. I) A covering for Booth, n. A temporary or make the foot and leg reaching to the shift dwelling. 1. 2. 90.

calf, or to the knee; a half-boot. Bountie, n. †Kindness; benefi- NED. (a) Of the tragedian. 1. 1. cence. 4. 6. 62, 63.

18; 5. 3. 266. (b) For ordinary Braue, adj. I) Worthy, excel-, wear. 4. 292. lent, 'fine.' Arch. I. 2. 207.

2) Buskins : a nickname for a 2) Of high rank? Fine and ele- 'tribune,' or city magistrate. 5. 3. gant ? Arch. 2. I. 145.

Bribe, v. (a) To obtain by hire By, prep. *Of; concerning; or reward; (b) fto extort; steal. against. 3. 4. 314; 5. 3. 72, 109. 4. 8. 28.

By-course, n. An irregular or Briefe, adj. Phr., Be briefe: disreputable course of action. be expeditious, quick. 1. 1. 8. 81.

Bring knowne, v. phr. To make acquainted. Arch. 3. I. 251–2.

с Brize, n. (Obs. form of Breeze.) || Caduceus, The herald's A gad-fly. 3. 1. 261. Cf. note. wand carried by Mercury, pictured

Broker, n. A retailer (obs.); with two serpents twined about it. esp. a second hand dealer, pawn- 4. 4. 14. Cf. note. broker. 2. 2. 236. Cf. note.

Caitiue, adj. (A form of Brooke, v. To endure; tolerate. Caitiff.) Worthless; vile. 5. 3. Obs. or arch. 4. 3. 91.

Bruit, n. Rumor, tidings. Arch. Camrade, m. (ad. Sp. camarada, 5. 2. 73.

orig. 'chamberful, then ‘chamberBuffon, n. A buffoon; wag; mate'; F. camarade, camerade.) railer. A.D. 176.

Comrade, here with something of Buffon, adj. Addicted to low the earlier sense of chamber-mate, raillery. Arch. 5. 3. 382.

tent-fellow, and so associate and Bully, n. A term of endearment equal. I. 2. 37. and familiarity, orig. applied to ! ||Cantharides, n. Pl. of caneither sex: sweetheart, darling. tharis, a beetle known as the SpanLater applied to men only, imply- 'ish fly. The term here means ing friendly admiration : good biting scoundrel. 5. 3. 436. Cf. friend, fine fellow, 'gallant.' Often note. prefixed as a sort of title to the Cargo, n. †A term of contempt name or designation of the person or opprobrium. 5. 3. 459.

n.

458.

a

2. I. 102.

Carrier, n. A messenger; one Cheape, adv. A derivative of who fetches and carries. 1. 2. 173. the obs. n. Cheap, meaning 'bar

Case, n. I) An animal's skin gain. Cf. note. 1. 2. 209. or hide. 5. 3. 651.

Check, v. To rebuke; censure. 2) †A pair; brace. 5. 3. 396. Arch. or dial. 3. 5. III. Cf. note.

+Cheu'rill, adj. Of the nature of 3) Phr., In case: in condition. cheverel-leather; yielding, elastic. Obs. or arch. 1. 3. 13.

1. 2. 137. Cf. note. Cast, v. To vomit. Arch. and

Chide, v. Phr., Chide at: to dial. I. I. IO.

scold. 2. 2. 60. Catamite, n. (ad. Lat. Cata

Chiefe, n. The head or princimitus, f. Ganymedes, the name of pal part of the escutcheon, occupyJove's cup-bearer.) A boy kept for ing the upper third part of the unnatural purposes. NED. 4. 5. 66. shield . . . NED.

Cf. Catch-pole, n. [a. med. Lat.

note. cacepollus, lit. chase-fowl.] A *Chil-blain'd, adj. 5. 3. 296, 504 sheriff's officer, esp. one who arrests (cf note), 507. for debt. Obs.? 3. 4. 18. Cf. note. Choice,

adj. 1) †Preferred, Cates, n. pl. Choice viands, chosen. 3. 5. 48. dainties. 4. 5. 41.

2) +Careful in choosing; disCensure, n. [ad. Lat. censura, criminating. 4. 8. 9. censorship, judgment.] Judgment,

Chose, pp. A shortened form of opinion, criticism. Arch. 1. 2. 259; chosen. Occasional in ME., but 3. 5. 123, et passim.

very frequent in the 18th c. NED. Centum viri, n. pl. Members

5. 3. 411. of the ancient Roman court dealing

Chymæra, n. A fancy, delusion. with common causes. 3. 4. 57. Cf.

1. 2. 206. note.

Citie mannerly, adj. phr. AcCertified, pp. + Reassured, satis

cording to the citizens' ways; bourfied. 4. 2. 66.

geois. 4. I. 35. Chace, v. intr. †To hunt? 5.

Citi-sin, n. Citizen (a quibble). I. 26.

2. I. 127. Challenge, v. To assert claim to; demand or call for. Arch. 5.

Clarified, pp. adj. Clear, refined;

esp. high-pitched, thin. 4. 5. 5. 3. 52. Character, n.

Obs. form of Clerk. A sign, an evi

Clarke, n. dence,

esp.
of moral qualities. 4. 3. 122.

Clem, v. tr. To starve.
Arch. 2. 2. 32.

Obs. Charme, n. [ad. Lat. carmen, a

1. 2. 194 song.) A chorus, a singing in con

Clog, n.

A weight attached to cert. Arch. 2. 2. 216.

the leg or neck to impede motion Cheape, adj. Of slight value or or prevent escape. 4. 2. 60. account; phr., Make cheape: to Close, adj. Hidden or secluded. bring into contempt. 1. 2. 46. 4. 9. 47; 5. 3. 122.

exc. dial.

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