Page images
PDF
EPUB

[273]

TO

THE VERTVOVS, ,
AND MY VVORTHY

FRIEND,

Mr. Richard Martin.

S"

IR, A thankefull man owes a courtefie euer: the

vnthankefull, but when he needes it. To make

mine owne marke appeare, and sew by which of these feales I am known, I send you this peece of what may liue of mine; for whose innocence, as for the Authors, you were once a noble and timely undertaker, to the greatest Iustice of this kingdome. Enioy now the delight of your goodnesse; which is to see that prosper, you preferu'd: and posteritie to owe the reading of that, without offence, to your name; which so much ignorance, and malice of the times, then conspir'd to haue supprest.

[merged small][ocr errors]
[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

THE PERSONS THAT ACT Q Dramatis Personæ 1716+ Q bears on this page an address 'Ad Lectorem' (Martial, 7. 12. 9-12.), and omits THE SCENE. ROME. 1640 subjoins the list of come. dians as printed on p. (354), folio 1616. W, G, N, interpolate * Luscus' after 'Tucca'; G, N, add ' Aesop' and 'Equites'. TREBATIVS] om. 2

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors]

L

ΙΟ

Arising in the midst of the stage.
Ight, I salute thee, but with wounded nerues :
Wishing thy golden splendor, pitchy dark-

nefle.

What's here? Th’ARRAIGNMENT? I: This,
this is it,
That our sunke eyes haue wak’t for, all this while:
Here will be subiect for my snakes, and me.

5
Cling to my necke, and wrists, my louing wormes,
And cast you round, in soft, and amorous foulds,
Till I doe bid, vncurle: Then, breake your knots,
Shoot out your selues at length, as your forc't stings
Would hide themselues within his malic't fides,
To whom I shall apply you. Stay! the shine
Of this assembly here offends my fight,
I'le darken that first, and out-face their grace.
Wonder not, if I ftare: these fifteene weekes
(So long as since the plot was but an embrion)

15 Haue I, with burning lights, mixt vigilant thoughts, In expectation of this hated play: To which (at last) I am arriu'd as Prologue. Nor would I, you should looke for other lookes, Gesture, or complement from me, then what

20 After . . . founding.) om. Q ENVIE.] LIVOR. Q S. D.] om. 2 Envy arises in the midst of the stage G, N 3 I] ay G, N (uniformly) 20 compliment W+

than 1640+

Th’infected bulke of ENVIE can afford:
For I am risse here with a couetous hope,
To blast your pleasures, and destroy your sports,
With wrestings, comments, applications,
[276] Spie-like suggestions, priuie whisperings,
And thousand such promooting sleights as these.
Marke, how I will begin: The Scene is, ha !
ROME? ROME? and ROME? Cracke ey-strings, and

25

your balles

30

35

40

Drop into earth; let me be euer blind.
I am preuented; all my hopes are crost,
Checkt, and abated; fie, a freezing sweate
Flowes forth at all my pores, my entrailes burne:
What should I doe? Rome? Rome? O my vext

foule
How might I force this to the present state?
Are there no players here? no poet-apes,
That come with basiliskes eyes, whose forked tongues
Are fteept in venome, as their hearts in gall?
Eyther of these would helpe me; they could wrest,
Peruert, and poyson all they heare, or see,
With senselesse glosses, and allusions.
Now if you be good deuils, flye me not.
You know what deare, and ample faculties
I haue indow'd you with: Ile lend you more.
Here, take my snakes among you, come, and eate,
And while the squeez'd juice flowes in your blacke

jawes,
Helpe me to damne the Authour. Spit it foorth
Vpon his lines, and shew your rustie teeth
At euerie word, or accent: or else choose
Out of my longest vipers, to sticke downe
In your deep throats; and let the heads come forth
At your ranke mouthes; that he may see you arm'd
With triple malice, to hisse, sting, and teare
His worke, and him; to forge, and then declame,

45

50

55

Traduce, corrupt, apply, enforme, suggest:
O, these are gifts wherein your foules are blest.
What? doe you hide your selues? will none appeare?
None answere? what, doth this calme troupe affright

you?
Nay, then I doe despaire: downe, sinke againe.
This trauaile is all lost with my dead hopes.
If in such bosomes, spight haue left to dwell,
Enuie is not on earth, nor scarse in hell.

60

The third sounding.

PROLOGVE.

STO

IO

1 Tay, Monster, ere thou finke, thus on thy head

Set we our bolder foot; with which we tread

Thy malice into earth: So spight should die, [277] Despisd and scorn'd by noble industrie. If any muse why I salute the stage,

5 An armed Prologue; know, 't is a dangerous age: Wherein, who writes, had need present his Scenes Fortie fold-proofe against the coniuring meanes Of base detractors, and illiterate apes, That fill vp roomes in faire and formall shapes. 'Gainst there, haue we put on this forc't defence: Whereof the allegorie and hid sence Is, that a well erected confidence Can fright their pride, and laugh their folly hence. Here now, put case our Authour should, once more, 15 Sweare that his play were good; he doth implore, You would not argue him of arrogance: How ere that common spawne of ignorance, 54 enforce 1640, 1692, 1716, W 61 Descends slowly. G, N

The ... founding.] om. Q PROLOGVE.] PROLOGVS Q As she disappears, enter Prologue hastily, in armour. G Enter PROLOGUE hastily. N

« PreviousContinue »